Spam

Spam is the term given to unwanted, unrequested messages sent out in a communication system (usually email). Questions about spam, spammers, and how to stop receiving spam belong here.

Asked in Spam, Africa, Senegal, Computer and Internet Fraud, Emigration and Refugees

Would it be a scam or real if you get an E-mail saying there a refugee by the name of ... who desperately needs your help?

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If you have you received an email from a person (especially a girl) who claimed he/ she is residing in a refugee camp in Dakar, Senegal (or any other country or camp), its most likily a scam.
Asked in Food & Cooking, Spam, England

What is Spam made of?

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The ingredients in Spam are chopped pork shoulder meat with added ham, salt, water, modified potato starch as a binder and sodium nitrite as a preservative.
Asked in Spam

What are opinions on Justbling watches?

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They are genuine diamond watches.
Asked in Computer Terminology, Spam

What does SPAM mean?

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Electronic Spam, commonly shortened and called "Spam," is a general abuse of online messaging systems, including instant messaging, email, etc. Spam is most commonly associated with email spam and is defined as a constant stream of nearly identical emails indicating a single point, e.g. advertising. Other s Spam is the abuse of electronic messaging systems to send unsolicited bulk messages indiscriminately. While the most widely recognized form of spam is e-mail spam, the term is applied to similar abuses in other media: instant messaging spam, Usenet newsgroup spam, Web search engine spam, spam in blogs, wiki spam, Online classified ads spam, mobile phone messaging spam, Internet forum spam, junk fax transmissions, and file sharing network spam. Spamming remains economically viable because advertisers have no operating costs beyond the management of their mailing lists, and it is difficult to hold senders accountable for their mass mailings. Because the barrier to entry is so low, spammers are numerous, and the volume of unsolicited mail has become very high. The costs, such as lost productivity and fraud, are borne by the public and by Internet service providers, which have been forced to add extra capacity to cope with the deluge. Spamming is widely reviled, and has been the subject of legislation in many jurisdictions. Electronic junk mail or junk newsgroup postings. Some people define spam even more generally as any unsolicited e-mail. However, if a long-lost brother finds your e-mail address and sends you a message, this could hardly be called spam, even though it's unsolicited. Real spam is generally e-mail advertising for some product sent to a mailing list or newsgroup. In addition to wasting people's time with unwanted e-mail, spam also eats up a lot of network bandwidth. Consequently, there are many organizations, as well as individuals, who have taken it upon themselves to fight spam with a variety of techniques. But because the Internet is public, there is really little that can be done to prevent spam, just as it is impossible to prevent junk mail. However, some online services have instituted policies to prevent spammers from spamming their subscribers. Spam of the Food Variety It is a word used for chopped pork canned and pressed in loaf form.
Asked in Spam, Google Gmail and Messenger

How do you Stop Christianmingle emails?

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Install a filter that blocks them. It won't actually stop them per se, but you won't have to see them anymore. I've found that typically, unsubscribing from spam is actually a red flag that says "Yes, I do read spam! Please send me a lot more!"
Asked in Computer Terminology, Spam

What does spam stand for in computer terms?

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It doesn't stand for anything. It was named after the tinned brand of pork and ham called Spam, featured in a Monty Python sketch where it was included in every meal. People will sometimes turn it into an acronym, such as 'S=Stupid P=Pointless A=Annoying M=Messages (SPAM= Stupid Pointless Annoying Messages)', but this is a 'backronym' - the word was coined first as a real word and an acronym form invented afterwards.
Asked in Spam, Email and IM

How do you stop getting foreign emails?

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Do not open them in your email. Delete them or send them to spam immediately. Otherwise, you can change your email and just let the people you know have the address. Set up another email address for times when you need one for online or for a job application. That will keep the spam away from your personal email. You can also change the settings on your email, but that will probably become an annoyance, since some will be important emails that you would rather have.
Asked in Microsoft Windows, Spam, Email and IM

How do you prevent your legitimate email replies from being tagged as spam and ending up in MSN junk mail?

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Try to save the e-mail addresses of the legit e-mailers in your address book, hopefully this will prevent them being sent to the junk mail box. Try this, should work. You could also try lowering the strength of your spam control.
Asked in Spam

What does spam or scam mean?

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A scam simply means that someone is decieving you for his or her own good, in other words it means that people are tricking you for what you have. Spam is a repetitive post or say if someome was sending you a ton of mail in a very short amount of time, that is an example of spam.
Asked in Mobile Phones, Spam, SMS and Texting

What is Jamster?

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Jamster is a company that supplies ringtones and wallpapers to celluar telephones for GSM companies and is using scam like techniques. You send a text message to a certain number and your bill will be charged 2$ a week
Asked in Spam

Should you use spam to advertise your business?

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No. It is unethical and generally illegal. Plus, in the words of Ken Hollis of the alt.spam FAQ: "It is best not to be such a pain that the Geeks find an intense interest in you. They are almost certainly smarter than you, at the very least they are smarter in the ways that the Internet works. The worst thing for you, however, is that they usually have no life and can easily make you 'their life'." If you spam, you'll be causing trouble, and asking for trouble. ANSWER 2 I completely agree with the previous answer, SPAM is stupid and it will not really get you the results you are looking for. Answer 3 Spam will also get you unwanted traffic. Sure, you will be getting more page hits but none of them will be enticed by what you have to offer because it was not what they were looking for to begin with. Answer 4 Spamming nowadays is considered as illicit and if you use it then their are the chances that the person block your ID and the mailing company would even suspend your account. But their are some options through which you can save your e-mail from being called a spam, the very good example is to ask for the visitors to give their e-mails for giving them some offer and when you send them the e-mail then you can give them an option for opting out from your newsletter mail anytime if they want, in that way your mail would not be called a spam because the user has opt for getting your mail my signing.
Asked in Web Design and Publishing, Domain Names, Spam

How do you convert an IP address to a domain name?

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http://samspade.org/ is the IP lookup tool most recommended by Ken Hollis of the alt.spam FAQ. (Use the "IP Whois" form.) For help converting unusual or strange numbers, see the alt.spam FAQ: http://gandalf.home.digital.net/spamfaq.html
Asked in PSW Spyware, Spam, Email and IM

Can the victim of a 419 scam sue the email provider if the provider failed to take action after they were notified of the scam?

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I would have to say yes. But it depends weather you ask them or not. If you ask them and they say yes, give them a little bit, and is they never do, you probably can. But I wouldn't recommend it with higher up e-mail servers like Yahoo(www.yahoo.com), G-Mail(www.google.com and type in 'g-mail'", etc. No. For the most part, federal law protects internet services providers from liability arising from the actions of its users. If an AOL user publishes a defamatory message, AOL is not responsible for that person's actions. The best option is to file a complain with the Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) A partnership between the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the National White Collar Crime Center (NW3C). Alerts for consumers and easy-to-use ...IC3 accepts online Internet crime complaints from either the person who believes they were defrauded or from a third party to the complainant. We can best process your complaint if we receive accurate and complete information from you. http://www.ic3.gov/
Asked in Computer Viruses, Spam, Windows XP

Can you program computer to return spam to sender multiple times?

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I remember coming across something called "Blue Frog" project, which adds a button to your email inbox, when you pressed it the "Blue Frog" Forwards this email to it's server and keeps sending requests to the original sender to stop spamming the "Blue Frog" community
Asked in Spam, Celebrity Fan Contact Information, Email and IM

How do you prevent spammers from getting your email address?

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Well, do not click on any adds that you may see on the Internet that need your e-mail address. Don't give your e-mail address to anyone but the people that you know (you never know if that person that said he would email you is actually going to use it to get to those adds!) Here is the answer from Ken Hollis and the alt.spam FAQ to "How *did* I get this unsolicited e-mail anyway?": Unfortunately just posting a message to a news group can get unsolicited e-mail. Some spammers "harvest" e-mail addresses by stripping e-mail return addresses out of messages people post. ... The solution to this is to "mung" your address when you post by adding in extra characters (like "Spam") in your return address. You then put in your signature something like "Remove the word Spam from my e-mail to contact me". See: http://www.private.org.il/harvest.html - How spammers harvest addresses http://home.cnet.com/software/0-3227888-8-6602372-1.html - Riskiest e-mail behaviors on the Net http://members.aol.com/emailfaq/mungfaq.html - Address Munging http://gamesbyemail.com/Documentation/AntiSpamEmailLinks/ - Examples of disguising your e-mail. http://www.applelinks.com/articles/2001/07/20010730122944.shtml - converting email addresses to "digital entities" http://www.inter-linked.com/content/spiderbait.php3 - A Java script to encode your e-mail address on a web page Larry suggests making your e-mail address into a JPEG (picture). You can't click on it and send a e-mail, but the spammers can't harvest your e-mail address either. Do not ever reply to the "unsubscribe" option in a spam. That only confirms your e-mail as "real" and gets your e-mail address sold to others. More spam for you. Another way to get e-mail is to have a World Wide Web page. Some spammers just start a web spider (a piece of software that just traverses World Wide Web pages and collects information) going and collect e-mail that way. To prevent your e-mail from being harvested, you can "mung" your web e-mail. Yet another way for spammers to verify your address is real is to have multiple unique pages to their site so that when you click on the URL they provide, they know that you (and only you) got that URL. See: http://cnn.com/2000/TECH/computing/01/14/email.privacy.idg/index.html Greg tells us of yet another clever trick. The spammer imbeds a unique image (Web Bug) in a spam e-mail so that just the act of opening the e-mail tells the spammer that your address is "live": img srcclusters_1-9 & image0 I have seen yet another trick that spammers use, they make the URL a web bug. When you have a link like http://NAIOKWDVDISY.adwarebde.com/?id=02025 the "name" of the web site NAIOKWDVDISY can uniquely identify what e-mail address that spam was sent to. Just doing a NSLookup of the name will point out the e-mail address of the person that the spam was sent to thus identifying a "live" person. Pierre suggests that when putting a mailto URL in a web page, precede and follow it with "%20". When someone clicks on it, it will merely put spaces, which will be ignored, around the address, but when a spammer harvests the address, it will have a %20 in it, which will render it undeliverable. Click on the Link below for the answer to all of your questions! www.something.com Just checking...
Asked in Spam, Email and IM, SMS and Texting

How do you know if an email message is a hoax?

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You will know if an email message is a hoax if it sounds too good to be true or if it directs you to a fake website. For example, it might direct you to a website that is supposed to belong to a well-known company but when you see the URL, it does not match the one for that company.
Asked in Spam, Facebook, Email and IM

How do you trace where an email message came from?

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Here's an abbreviated version of the answer from Ken Hollis and the alt.spam FAQ: To trace the e-mail you have to look at the header. Most mail readers do not show the header because it contains information that is for computer to computer routing. The information you usually see from the header is the subject, date and the "From" / "Return" address. About the only thing in an e-mail header that can't be faked is the "Received" portion referencing your computer (the last received). Unfortunately there is no "single" place to complain to about spam (or Unsolicited Commercial E-Mail). Complaints have to be directed to the correct ISP (Internet Service Provider) that the spam originated from. URL's to help you figure out how to look at the headers: http://support.xo.com/abuse/guide/guide1.shtml http://www.rahul.net/falk/mailtrack.html Also, please look through the body of the message for e-mail addresses to reply to. Complain to the postmasters of those sites also (see below for a list of complaint addresses). Assuming a reasonably standard and recent sendmail setup, a Received line that looks like: Received: from host1 (host2 [ww.xx.yy.zz]) by host3 (8.7.5/8.7.3) with SMTP id MAA04298 shows four pieces of useful information (reading from back to front, in order of decreasing reliability): * The host that added the Received line (host3) * The IP address of the incoming SMTP connection (ww.xx.yy.zz) * The reverse-DNS lookup of that IP address (host2) * The name the sender used in the SMTP HELO command when they connected (host1).
Asked in Spam

Why is spam so objectionable to many people?

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If you are talking about email spam:Because it fills up the email box with unwanted emails selling many different things. If you are talking about the Spam meat in a can: Because those that are not used to it find the flavor objectionable. It seems to me that you have to develop a taste for it. Which comes through early childhood repeated exposure and a good cook who is able to make it taste good.
Asked in Spam, Email and IM

What is the easiest way to stop spam?

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Sorry to tell you this but if you received a spam (Unsolicited Commercial E-Mail) there is no "easy" way to get the spam stopped. Generally if you reply (unsubscribe) this confirms that your e-mail address is "live" and just gets your e-mail address sold to other spammers. Spam has to be dealt with one at a time. Sorry, it isn't easy to stop the spam. The "Internet" (the collective non-profit and profit entities of the network) is trying to fix this problem but it is taking time. The "easiest" way to stop getting spam is to change your e-mail address and only give your e-mail address to people you absolutely trust, and to NEVER allow the e-mail address to be posted to a web site or posted ANYWHERE on the internet. If your e-mail address shows up on a search engine, then the spammers can find your e-mail address also. Be careful about giving your e-mail address to companies that purport to be against spam. There are businesses that make a good living filtering out spam both on a personal and corporate level. I would suggest that if you really don't want to deal with spam that you get an e-mail address from one of these services (Please note I am not recommending this service, just using it as an example). Do a search: http://www.google.com/search?qspam+blocking+software Be aware that no spam blocking software (as of yet) is perfect and you may get "false positives". An e-mail from a friend may be detected as spam and may get deleted as spam or moved to the spam box. If you are required to give a "legal" e-mail address to a company you don't know or trust, you could go to http://mail.com or a similar site and set up a free account.
Asked in Spam, Book Reports, US Marine Corps History and Traditions, Navy SEALs

How do you report a website that spammed you?

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Simple Answer The spam you get may or may not be from the web site that is listed in the message. Spammers cannot be trusted in any possible way, so unless you have some technical skills as mentioned below, you should let someone else figure out who is responsible and who to tell about it. I highly recommend using www.SPAMCOP.net to report any and all spam. If you follow their instructions you will be able to provide them with the information about the spam you get and they will analyze it to determine who really sent it and who it should be reported to. They also take steps to "hide" your information so that it will be hard for the spammers to find out who is reporting them. SPAMCOP not only reports to the ISP, who may be spam-friendly, but also their larger upstream provider who are generally not. Answer Here's the answer from Ken Hollis and the alt.spam FAQ: Many spammers use throw away accounts, accounts that they know will be deleted as soon as the service gets a complaint. Of course the spammers mentality is "if it is free it is for me to abuse". If the spammer really annoyed you then you might wish to dig and get every account possible deleted. What you need to do is actually go to the WWW page that they advertise, look at the page and usually the page will redirect you to another site (or possibly redirect 2 or 3 times). Send a complaint to these sites (with the original spam). It is important to explain to the site you are complaining to how you got to their site so that they don't ignore you. In Netscape and Explorer there is an option to "view source". This will pop up a page with all of the http source from the page. This page will have all of the "links" to the next site. If you look at the http source and it is unreadable (and sez "Haywyre"), take a look at :http://www.netdemon.net/haywyre/ There are spammers out there that actually have a clue. They use open Web Proxies to reroute their web page to another location. When you do a ping of a web site, the ping is of the open web proxy. The open web proxy then redirects you when it gets the request for the web page. A complete technical explanation can be found at:http://www.Google.com/groups?selm=3ee16105$1_2@nntp2.nac.net Another thing spammers do is to abuse free WWW services to set up a web page that is encoded with Java script so that you cannot see what the HTML looks like. The spammer then redirects the information to their "real" site. http://www.spamsites.org/decode.HTML tells us that to decode the Java script and complain to the people that are actually hosting the spammers, set up a bookmark called "Decode Javascript" and set the URL (thanks to Code by Kicken) as the below, the code is all on one very long line:javascript:h=document.getElementsByTagName('HTML')[0].innerHTML;function disp(h){h=h.replace(/</g, '\n<');h=h.replace(/>/g,'>');document.getElementsByTagName('body')[0].innerHTML=' <HTML>'+h.replace(/(\n|\r)+/g,'\n')+'</HTML> ';}void(disp(h)); Your computer may take a while to decode all the Java, just be patient.
Asked in Spam, Conspiracy Theories, Perfumes and Colognes

What is perfume hoax?

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I am not sure if this is what you are referring to but I have heard about people who will stand in car parks and come up to you with a bottle of 'perfume' and ask if you would like to try it. When you say yes they actually give you a whiff of chloroform which knocks you out for a bit and they steal your wallet or bag etc. Fortunately, this one is still in the hoax stage as no actual incidents have been reported to authorities.
Asked in Questions about WikiAnswers and Answers.com, Downloader Viruses, Spam

Should you click on the 'remove me' links in spam?

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There is some controversy about this. Most legitimate e-mail newsletters and many semi-legitimate e-mail marketers have "remove me" links that do exactly what they purport to do: remove you from their e-mail list or database. However, these links have been used for the opposite purpose. In the opinion of Ken Hollis of the alt.spam FAQ: "NEVER reply to the 'Remove Me' e-mail addresses or sites. This only confirms that you have a live e-mail address and makes *your* e-mail address more valuable to sell to other spammers."
Asked in Spam, Makeup, Sales and Customer Service, Employee Development and Training

How do you introduce yourself to a new client?

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Too may people in business look at the telephone as an anchor--that's how they feel about lifting it when they have to make outgoing calls to potential clients. For some, you'd think it was covered with spiders or that it might electrocute them if they touch it. That reaction revolves around the fear of rejection. Granted, not too many people are brave enough to willingly put themselves in a position to be rejected. However, those who do will find all sorts of long-term rewards for the temporary pain they'll experience. With the right attitude and by paying close attention to what happens, each rejection you deal with will be a learning experience. You'll learn what not to say and when not to call. The key here is to turn that around so you can master what to say and when to call. With every rejection, you'll want to take a quick moment to analyze the situation in order to benefit from it. Rather than letting it ruin your attitude for the next call, you should find yourself saying, "Well, that didn't work. What's a better way to say it?" With proper fine-tuning, you'll soon find your calls being well received and you'll experience fewer rejections. To save you some time on this learning curve, here are eight points you need to consider before making any business calls. document.writeln(AAMB2); 1. Develop a professional greeting. Don't just say hello and jump into your telephone presentation without taking a breath or allowing the other party to participate. Your greeting should err on the side of formality. Begin with Mr., Mrs. or Ms, as in "Good morning, Mr. Smith." Or "Good evening, Mrs. Jones." Everyone else says, "Hello." Be different. Be professional. 2. Introduce yourself and your company."My name is Sally Smith with ABC Company. We're a local firm that specializes in helping businesses like yours save money." Don't get too specific yet. Don't mention your product. If you do, that allows the other party to say, "Oh, we're happy with what we've got. Thanks anyway," and hang up. By keeping your introduction general, yet mentioning a benefit, you'll peak your prospect's curiosity and keep them on the line longer. 3. Express gratitude. Always thank the potential client for allowing you a few moments in his busy day. Tell him that you won't waste a second of his time. "I want to thank you for taking my call. This will only involve a moment of your time so you can get back to your busy schedule." Don't say that you'll "just take a moment." The feeling evoked by them hearing that you'll take anything from them will put them off. 4. State the purpose of your call. It's best if you can provide the purpose within a question. "If we can show you a way to improve the quality of your product at a lower cost, would you be interested to know more?" This is very likely to get a yes response. At this point, you're ready to start selling an opportunity to meet this person or to get their permission to provide them with more information. You're not selling your product yet--you're selling what your product will do for him. 5. Schedule a meeting. Get a confirmation to meet, either in person or to teleconference to get the information you need in order to give a solid presentation. If he's so interested that he wants to do it right then and there, that's OK. 6. If a face-to-face meeting is the most appropriate next step, use the alternate-of-choice questioning strategy. Offer him two times, "Mr. Johnson, I can pop by your office at 2:15 p.m. today to discuss this further. Or would 9:45 a.m. tomorrow better suit your schedule?" You didn't say, "When can we meet?" When you use the alternate of choice, you take control of getting the appointment. And note: Asking for an off-hour gets you noticed. There's something about setting a meeting at an off-hour that says you're a salesperson who'll be punctual and respect your prospect's time. Try it. 7. Thank them for their time today and for the upcoming appointment. Reconfirm the date, time and location of the appointment. Ask for directions if you need them. Tell him how much preparation you'll do in order to make the best use of the time you'll share. Give him your contact information this way: "If anything else comes to mind that I should be aware of prior to our meeting, please contact me at (61) 433 007 961." 8. Follow up. If your meeting is more than a few days in the future, send a letter of confirmation immediately. If the meeting is tomorrow, send an e-mail confirmation. Keep it short and upbeat.
Asked in Computer Viruses, Spam, MiniClip

Does miniclip give you spyware?

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Yes... Yes, Miniclip gives you spyware, trojans and other malware. The best way to defend against these threats is to download windows live onecare from the link in the "Related Links" section of this answer. It includes a 90 day trial and a 2 way trial that you keep even when the trial runs out. What's great is that it scans what you download before it is saved on your system. Basically, it scans what you're doing to make sure you don't download malware. I too have received spyware from miniclip when I tried to play hamsterball. The spyware was called "Miniclip Game Loader" and is a Trojan. Yes, miniclip.com does give you spyware and viruses. I have proof. I have scanned it and found viruses and spyware. Trojan Downloads are included in many games. Do not buy anything from the store because it will give you a Trojan Downloader. A Trojan Downloader is a program that lets miniclip (or any other owner) do anything they want with your computer. Games, especially ones that use the "Miniclip Game Loader" activex (Best Friends, Platypus) give you Trojan Downloaders. Yes it does. "Miniclip Game Loader" is a common Trojan from it. I have had it twice, once from platypus and once from hamsterball. No... Hello. No, miniclip does not have spyware - I have scanned it many times with various anti spyware/adware tools. No, it does not give you any spyware or malware. Your anti virus/spyware/malware detection program just thinks that it is because it allows the game to do more than what most games can normally do. Therefore, it thinks that it's a virus or whatever but it is not.

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