Wildfires

Occurring in many parts of the world, wildfires are extensive in size and spread quickly, leaving destruction in their paths. Questions in the Wildfires category include how wildfires start, statistics on wildfires, equipment and techniques used for fighting them, how to stay safe in the event of a wildfire, and more.

Asked in Wildfires

How do wildfires start without human error?

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If it is not started by human error or neglect then it usually occurs from lighting, or mother natures caused.
Asked in Australia, Wildfires

How do bushfires affect people?

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well, it can be life threatening, it can harm u servely or kill u and its not only life threatening it can cause loss or damaged to homes and people will have to live somewhere else to they find or fix their home!
Asked in Car Fuses and Wiring, Mercury Grand Marquis, Wildfires

Where is the fuse box for a 1986 Mercury Marquis mid-size?

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remove plastic cover under steering column. It is held on with screws.
Asked in Rain and Flooding, Geography, Wildfires

What are some geographical processes associated with bush fires and wildfires?

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Progression of brushfires and wildfires Bushfires occur in climates that are dry and hot (such as California in the summer). Occasional strong winds and summertime cold fronts can lead to extreme fire danger. Dangerous areas also include large areas of dry grass and trees, which burn easily and are common in the summer. Several environmental and geographical factors help bush fires progress: * High winds provide more oxygen * Amount of fuel (trees, grass, etc.) * Low humidity * High air temperature * Terrain (fires spread faster up sides of hills) Additionally, embers from the main fire can set spot fires ahead, causing the fire to leap ahead with the help of the wind.
Asked in Wildfires

What happens when a wildfire happens?

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when a forest fire occurs, it may burn down the entire forest, and sometimes affect the surrounding areas and start regular fires in such places as homes nearby. forest fires are such a tradgedy, i hope they may never occur again. however, they are becoming more and more common nowadays. unfortunately i dont know the main cause so sorry about that.
Asked in Wildfires

How do wildfires change the earth's surface?

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It burns it and makes it crusty and all the plants and trees die! Yep!
Asked in Environmental Issues, Wildfires

How does drought affect wildfire?

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Drought affects wild fires because everything is dry and there is not water or moisture in the air to help keep the ground or plants from dying off. It also causes a problem for the fire fighters in the way that they have to travel farther away to get the water they need to work the fire.
Asked in Earth Sciences, Wildfires

What starts bushfires?

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A bushfire primarily requires fuel and some method of igniting it. The method of ignition could be by man, either purposefully (vandalism) or accidentally, e.g. campfire left burning, a tossed cigarette, a glass bottle which focuses the sun's rays on the dry fuel. Fuel may be created through prolonged drought or dry conditions, which causes vegetation to dry out. This is why Australia is so prone to bushfires - drought is a common problem. Strong winds can fan the flames into a raging inferno, or a wind change can take a narrow fire front and turn the flank around into a wide front which is even more destructive and harder to control. Lightning strikes are a natural cause of bushfires, and one of the major causes. Another man-made cause is faulty power lines, when lines may start to arc, causing flying embers which quickly light dry vegetation.
Asked in Meteorology and Weather, Los Angeles, Wildfires

What are Santa Ana winds?

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The Santa Ana wind is a blustery, dry and warm (often hot) wind that blows out of the desert. Named after Southern California's Santa Ana Canyon and a fixture of local legend and literature, the Santa Ana is a blustery, dry and warm (often hot) wind that blows out of the desert. In Raymond Chandler's story Red Wind, the title being one of the offshore wind's many nicknames, the Santa Anas were introduced as "those hot dry [winds] that come down through the mountain passes and curl your hair and make your nerves jump and your skin itch. On nights like that every booze party ends in a fight. Meek little wives feel the edge of the carving knife and study their husbands' necks. Anything can happen." Local legends associate the hot, dry winds with homicides and earthquakes, but these are myths. (See note below regarding naming.) Another popular misconception that the winds are hot owing to their desert origin. Actually, the Santa Anas develop when the desert is cold, and are thus most common during the cool season stretching from October through March. High pressure builds over the Great Basin (e.g., Nevada) and the cold air there begins to sink. However, this air is forced downslope which compresses and warms it at a rate of about 10C per kilometer (29F per mile) of descent. As its temperature rises, the relative humidity drops; the air starts out dry and winds up at sea level much drier still. The air picks up speed as it is channeled through passes and canyons. Santa Anas can cause a great deal of damage. The fast, hot winds cause vegetation to dry out, increasing the danger of wildfire. Once the fires start, the winds fan the flames and hasten their spread. The winds create turbulence and establish vertical wind shear (in which winds exhibit substantial change in speed and/or direction with height), both posing aviation hazards. The winds tend to make for choppy surf conditions in the Southern California Bight, and often batter the north coast of Santa Catalina Island, including Avalon cove and the island's airport.
Asked in Science, Forests, Wildfires, Forest Fires

What are airplanes dumping on forest fires to try to extinguish them?

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The airplanes take water (normally from an ocean or lake) and store it in the airplane. When they reach the fire they dump the water on the fire.
Asked in Geography, Wildfires

What do you do in case of a bushfire?

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The first decision that needs to be made in case of a bushfire is whether you will stay and actively defend your property, or evacuate. The advantage of staying is that you are present at your property to put out small spot fires after the main fire has passed. The disadvantages, of course, involve the risks to personal safety. It is unlikely that you will be able to outrun a bushfire, so if you stay, you must have a plan to escape being burnt. If you choose to evacuate, pack the minimal essentials , including vital papers, ensure your pets are catered for, and carefully plan your route to avoid fire areas. If a bushfire is approaching (and indeed, prior to bushfire season starting) you should ensure gutters and eaves are clear of leaves and debris, and that vegetation is not growing close to your house. Remove these potential fuel sources, and try to create a fire break around your house. Many people choose to douse their gutters and walls with water, which can help, depending on the severity of the bushfire. Prepare an emergency kit, which includes such things as non-perishable food, medical supplies and/or first aid kit, drink bottles, buckets, water containers, portable radio with spare batteries, torch and first aid kit. It's also a good idea to have a fire fighting kit containing items such as long sleeved shirt and trousers, leather gloves, broad brimmed hat, goggles/safety glasses and sturdy footwear such as boots. If you are in a position where you are not near any shelter, you have few choices. People have been known to survive bushfires by remaining immersed in a creek or river until the fire passes, but the surface temperature of th water becomes frighteningly hot. If you cannot out run it or you are surrounded by the fire, you can set a fire where you are and try to direct this small fire away from you. By the time the larger inferno reaches you, there will be no fuel left to burn around you and you might survive. However, bushfires on the scale seen in places like Australia will still have the strength and force to sweep over large tracts of fuel-less ground, still destroying anything in their path.
Asked in Wildfires

Where are wildfires most likely to occur?

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Forest fire is common in places around the world where climates are moist enough to allow the growth of trees and shrubs, but have extended dry, hot periods. The most noted areas on Earth for wildfire include the vegetated areas of Australia, Western Cape of South Africa and throughout the dry forests and grasslands of North America and Europe. Wild fires in forests and grasslands in North America are particularly prevalent in the summer, fall and winter, especially during dry periods with an increase in dead fuels and high winds. That period of time is called the wild fire season. Western U.S. fires tend to be more dramatic during summer and fall while Southern fires are hardest to fight in late winter and early spring when fallen branches, leaves, and other material dry out and become highly flammable. Because of urban creep into existing forests, forest fires can often lead to property damage and has the potential to cause human injury and death. That "wildland urban interface" is a growing zone of transition between developed areas and undeveloped wildland. It makes fire protection a major concern for state and federal governments. Millions of dollars are spent annually on fire protection and training fire fighters in the United States. An endless list of subjects on how wildfire behaves are collectively called "fire science". I want to very briefly introduce you to some concepts, terminology and web sites where you can explore the subject of wildfire at your leisure. they are most likley to occur in la
Asked in Wildfires

What are the effects of wildfires?

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The effects of wildfires are: People lose there homes, animals are killed and also lose there vegetation, affects the air quality, the wind and heat. The good that wildfires do is they burn old dead trees, leaves, grass, anything that mother nature has not yet destroyed herself. Most fires leave a lot of animals homeless to say, which causes them to come into the city's nearest the fire and create a lot of havoc in the city around people.
Asked in Environmental Issues, Wildfires

How do wildfires start?

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Wildfires start with grass, brush or any dry vegetation, and anything can ignite them. They can be started by lightning, or also by a careless human who doesn't put out their campfire all the way or throws a lit cigarette or match into the brush. There are also some who intentionally set wildfires.
Asked in Environmental Issues, Wildfires

What is the Most explosive and violent type of wildfire?

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The most explosive and violent fires are wind driven fires. This usually occurs when there are sun downer winds that are driving the fire violently out of control.
Asked in Physics, Earthquakes, Wildfires, Forest Fires

What happens if you throw handful of cartridges in a fire?

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The bullet cases soon explode like a pack of fire crackers. The lead shot may be shot out in all directions. The heat from the fire makes the gunpowder explode and the cartridge and the lead shot, will fire out in opposite directions with the ability to injure or even kill.
Asked in Environmental Issues, Wildfires

What are the aftereffects of a wildfire?

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The answer to the question, of course, depends on the habitat involved. Grasslands seem to recover extremely quickly; new growth appears within days of burning. Low-lying fires in a ponderosa pine forest have little to no effect on the trees, but do burn up anything low-lying on the ground. Old growth forest fires are different, and they are discussed below. After the main fire passes through, the area may smolder and burn slowly for weeks or months if left to its natural course - often not until it is buried under a winter snow does the fire completely go out. Burned trees will stay standing for decades; they do not disappear completely in the fire as only the exterior of the tree burns. Some of the trees will fall down in the wind especially within the first year. Plants quickly re-sprout from the ground within a few days of a fire, other plants will get established by the next spring. The burned trees attract wood-boring insects, which, in turn, attract their predators: birds. Bluebirds and black-backed woodpeckers are examples of birds that seek out burned areas. By the end of the next growing season, many plants will have re-established themselves. Lodgepole pine trees are one of the first trees to regrow after a fire; they have special cones (serrotonous) that are fused shut and only open when they are baked in a fire, and therefore the seeds are spread in a sunny place with little other competition from trees. Within a decade or two, the lodgepole pines will get larger and mature. It may be perhaps 100 years before the forest looks similar to the way it did before the initial fire. In the interim, the forest will go through various successional stages, from each of which different animals benefit.
Asked in Environmental Issues, Thunderstorms and Lightning, Wildfires

What natural causes start wildfires?

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Natural causes of wildfires and bushfires include: lightning strikes dryness of the vegetation caused by intense prolonged heat, as in heatwave conditions strong, gusting winds which fan the flames
Asked in Environmental Issues, Wildfires

What can cause a wildfire?

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Lightening; careless disposal of a cigarette; careless use of a campfire; a spark from equipment or a train in a very dry area; arson.
Asked in Wildfires

Where do wildfires most likely occur?

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Nathan Ellis' house.
Asked in Wildfires, Psychology

What is the effect of wildfires on humans?

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Wildfires can burn down houses and injure or even kill people if they spread far and fast enough. A wildfire moves almost as fast as the wind itself - which is difficult to outrun. The loss of trees results in erosion, which may take out a section of road the next time it rains. The wildlife becomes displaced (has to move their range), crowding in on other animals' territory and stressing the resources in that area, possibly inhabited by humans. The lost tree varieties may not be able to reclaim the area without human assistance, and may take over 100 years to do so. They make me sad.
Asked in Wildfires

How do wildfires form?

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Wildfires form from lightning strikes, campers not putting fires out completely, people throwing lit cigarettes out of car windows, etc.
Asked in Wildfires

How hot can a wildfire get?

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Depending on what it is burning it can get upward of 3000 degrees F.