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What should be on a Repossession Order?

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2015-07-17 17:31:33
2015-07-17 17:31:33

Most of the time: Debtor(s) name, social, last known place of residence, last known place of employment, the legal owner's name and info, authority to repossess, the account information (such as the delinquency, acct #, and other pertinent info).phone numbers and references are sometimes included.

UPDATE.. Debtors name,add, ph#, POE,co-signors nane,add,ph#,POE, VIN of car, description of car, NO SSN,DOB, other personal info. Some states require a copy of the title, written auth. to repo from lender.

A LENDER CANNOT GIVE OUT YOUR SS #.

This is why idenity theft is one of the fastest growing crimes in this country. That is strictly confidential and if the lender does give it out, file complaints with the FTC and see an attorney.

You are wrong, when you sign the finance contract you in 99% of the times give up the information to collateral recovery agents/companies

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Related Questions


In a repossession order, a lender can repossess one's home if the court approves and grants permission. The judge could either set the case aside or give a repossession order.

No, all that is necessary is a valid repossession order from the lender.

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When you purchased the car, you may have received a lien title from the state. This is not a clear title of ownership. The lender in essence still owns the vehicle, at least part of it. It is held in security for the loan. If you are a repossession company or agent, you will be required to have an order of repossession. But, if you are a repossession company or agent, you should already know this.

The second to last sentence should read - Never will a voluntary repossession cost you MORE than a forced repossession. A repo is a repo. Voluntary Repos will, in most cases, save you money due to the cut in fees associated with the repossession. In some cases these fees will not be any less and the cost of a voluntary repo and the cost of a forced repo are the same. Never will a voluntary repossession cost you less than a forced repossession. Either way, voluntary repossession is the decision I would make, due to the possibility of a lesser cost.

As far as I know there is no statute of limitation on auto repossession in any state. Check with your state Attorney General to be sure. I will post a link for you to read. Repossession should be your last resort. Hiding a vehicle from repossession is a crime in some states. The consequences of repossession are always bad for you.

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Your wages can be garnished for an auto repossession if there is a court order. All wage garnishment's must be obtained from the county court of your residence.

To answer your question simply, a repossession order will typically be a 60 day repossession order. If however you do not contest the repossession or don't turn up to the hearing it is more likely to be a 30 day repossession order. However, you are not clear if you have even received a notice of intended court action or a court date. There is no hard, fast, rule which states when each lender will start repossession proceedings, they can be after just 1 missed payment - the average is between 2 and 3 missed payments. This answer above has been copy & pasted from http://www.repossession-stoppers.com/answers/how-long-does-a-house-repossession-take.htm which is a UK site So if you are from outside the UK it may be different...

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Depending on the state you reside in the procedure in order to get a repossession stopped is difficult. One of the few ways to stop a repossession is if a "breach of the peace" were to take place such as your car being in a locked garage or a threat of force was issued.

Only if the repossessor has an order for repossession of the trailer, as well. And even then, only under certain circumstances. If it's a commercial tractor trailer, and there's a load in that trailer, they may not take it, as the order of repossession does not cover the load, and they will face criminal charges if they do such.In the course of repossessing a vehicle, the repossession agency may not enter or move any vehicle (including a trailer) which is not in their order for repossession. They may detach a trailer from a truck being repossessed, but they can't actually take it.

Repossession laws vary from state to state. States also have different provisions for different types of property. You would need to be more specific about the circumstances, the property and the state where the repossession would take place. Your question should be reformed to ask, "Is a repossession under the following circumstances legal"? Asking what is considered an illegal repossession is much too broad a question.

If they have followed the laws and have a court order, yes.

Yes, there is no difference. A repossession is a repossession.

A repossession is a repossession, no matter if it is voluntary or not. Your credit will be ruined for 7 years.

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In a few states both the primary borrower and the cosigner must be notified by the lender through a "Right To Cure" notice before repossession action can occur. In Wisconsin a replevin order is necessary before a repossession can take place, but the cosigner is not always notified. In the majority of states the lender does not need to give either the primary or the cosigner notice of repossession action.


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