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Which pool is better - fiberglass or plaster?

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2008-08-18 12:00:20
2008-08-18 12:00:20

That is a lot like the Question: Which is better Ford,Chevy or GMC. It is all personal preference. A pool manufacturer has to meet strict guidelines in order to offer their goods to the public. It's not a matter of opinion, there are many differences in the fiberglass pool you purchase. Most fiberglass pool manufacturer's do offer a lifetime warranty of the structure of the pool but the surface warranty is very important as well. Most pool companies that install pools do not bring this to your attention because only three companies have a some what representable warranty. Most manufacturer's only have a one year surface warranty only covering osmotic blistering. Composite Pools and Viking offer a 3 year unconditional and 4 year pro-rated. Leisure Pools actually offers the best warranty on the surface with a 10 year unconditional warranty covering not only osmotic blistering but surface yellowing, cobalting, fading and discoloration and hairline cracks. So no it is not a matter of opinion it's simply the truth, you must look in depth about the pool warranty, it can tell you a lot about the product. First please hire only a licensed and insured pool builder. Which pool is better? Fiberglass is a good choice, and will last a lifetime but must be installed properly! Your pool professional did not learn to build quality overnight, and it takes years of experience in many areas of construction to become a pro. So since it takes years of experience to be a pool builder, you get what you pay for. Most find the sweetness of an unusually low price are long forgotten by the horror of expensive litigation or something worse.

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Hum, not sure if you can actually plaster a fiberglass pool. The glass would have to be removed first. You will have to consult a pool builder, a company that installs fiberglass shells or a company that installs fiberglass in plastered pools - thus converting a gunite/plaster pool into a gunite/fiberglass pool. The later uses the old pool shell as the sub-grade or foundation so to speak. k

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My mobile home park is going through this right now, so I will give you what I have learned. A word of caution, I am still trying to find an unbiased answer myself all of my pros/cons come from the fiberglass or plaster contractors so of course they believe their product is better. From our pool maintenance company (the one unbiased answer I have) They recommend using fiberglass on our Spa to reduce the chance of black algae, and plaster on the pool for the ease of maintenance. >>Pro's for plaster. Underwater epoxy repairs can be made without draining the pool. More resilient than the Gel-Coat of the fiberglass. More readily available contractors. >>Pro's for fiberglass. Resists Black Algae. Resists rust stains from behind. Lasts longer than plaster. ---Con's for plaster. If Black Algae starts its roots go through the pourous plaster and embed in the gunite, and will always return. Plaster doesn't bond well to old plaster. ---Con's for fiberglass. Fiberglass companies go out of business because their products fail in a few years. Fiberglass contractors are hard to find. The only way to repair fiberglass is to drain the pool and apply a new Gel-Coat over the entire surface. Fiberglass is not waterproof at all, only the Gel-Coat is. A Plaster contractor said... "I have heard that the fiberglass fails in like 5 years and then the company goes out of business." A Fiberglass contractor said... "I have heard of huge sections of the plaster falling off, because the old layer of plaster was not completely removed and when it came off it took the new plaster with it, in court the contractor's stance was that their coat held on fine and that it was not their fault since their work was still sticking to the old plaster." I wish a neurtral party like a university would do a study on this. -signed Just as lost in the sauce as the original poster.

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A fiberglass pool is far superior to a vinyl liner pool. It is also about twice as expensive.

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One of the differences between plaster and fiberglass pools is that fiberglass stays smooth. Plaster can become rough. Another difference is that unlike plaster, fiberglass does not chip, and crack.

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Either gunite or fiberglass will work well for an indoor pool.

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Is the water rusty color? Or is the rust color on the pool finish - plaster or vinyl or fiberglass?

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Gunite and concrete pools can be insulated by resurfacing with fiberglass. Because fiberglass is non-porous, heat is not lost through the plaster finish. If the pool is already fiberglass, there is nothing further that can be done, unless the pool is not yet installed in which case a spray of insulating material can be given to the outside of the fibreglass pool prior to installation.

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Yes, fiberglass pools have a smooth finish. Where a concrete pool was a pourus and rougher finish that gives alge something to grab on to. Also staining it. A low calcium level can pit a concrete pool, not a fiberglass, plus a fiberglass pool is more flexible,so ground movement wont crack it. In the long run the extra money you pay for fiberglass is worth it.

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That depends on the type of algae. Restate your question on the specific type of algae you have and include the construction category of the pool ( plaster, vinyl, fiberglass). k

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A fiberglass pool requires less maintenance, less repairs structurally in the future, is quick to install, and is good for smaller pools. Gunite pools are better for a pool deeper than 8 feet, custom shapes, and is a bit harder on the feet than a fiberglass pool.

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Fiberglass is because concrete will crack Yes I agree also, because we had a concrete pool when I was growing up and we were always repairing leaks, maybe the pool was just bad, but now that we purchased a fiberglass pool. We love the pool and it does not require much maintenance. We're going on 6 years with the pool and it still looks new.

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Not recommended. If the fiberglass pool floats, it will do considerable damage.

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What type of existing swimming pool? You can patch an existing fiberglass pool.

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No, because fiberglass can make you slip unlike concrete steps

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form_title= Fiberglass Pools form_header= Relax in your new fiberglass pool. What are your desired pool dimensions?*= _ [50] Are you replacing an existing pool?*= () Yes () No When do you want the pool installed?*= _ [50]

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yes they are easier to install and last much longer!

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i have a12x 25 fiberglass pool and it cost me 13,000 with istallation. check out floridanorth.com

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The pool or system was not started up properly. Those white deposits are most likely calcium carbonate. How long ago did this happen? What type of finish ~ plaster, vinyl, fiberglass? Ken

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You drain the water then plaster the walls from inside

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Typically two layers of plaster are put on a swimming pool. The plaster needs to have a thickness of at least three-eighths inches, which would be two layers of plaster.

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Depending on what the plaster surface damage is to the pool, it really is pretty easy to repair the plaster on your pool. You just need a chisel, or a small angle grinder if you are really handy, a hammer, a trowel, some water and a sponge. they sell pool patch kits for all the pool surfaces. look for pool plaster patch kits and you will find an easy to use solution.

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Hmmm, was the pool painted before? Why would yo want to paint a fiberglass pool? Are the fiberglass showing or coming off? Do a complete job by having a new fiberglass finish reapplied if the glass has deteriorated. Paint- yuk.


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