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Palestinian Territories

Why did so many Jews head to palestine in the 1940s?

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2014-11-21 22:06:44
2014-11-21 22:06:44

Because they were not welcome anywhere else.

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Nope. Many Jews live in Israel (what used to be called Palestine).


In 1948, Jews didn't have a country, so they invaded Palestine, killed many Palestinians, and forced many out. The Jews then changed the name of Palestine to Israel.


In the period from about 1945 onwards, many Poles saw the Jews are Communists trying to gain control of Poland.


The Jews were driven out of Israel many centuries ago by the Romans and since then, Jews have wanted their homeland in Palestine back.


The Crusades were rising hostility to the Jews. More and More Christians believed that all non-Christians were their enemy. On their way to Palestine, some Crusaders massacred European Jews and continued the killing in Palestine. After the Crusades, Jews were expelled from England in 1290 and from France in 1306 and again in 1394. Many of these Jews moved to eastern Europe. Many Crusaders who stayed in Palestine came to respect Muslims, but Cristian tolerance toward Jews continued.


Many Jews came to Palestine from Europe, trying to escape the Nazi Holocaust. They also came with the dream that they could build their own lives and a country where they would not be subject to discrimination again.


The Crusades were rising hostility to the Jews. More and More Christians believed that all non-Christians were their enemy. On their way to Palestine, some Crusaders massacred European Jews and continued the killing in Palestine. After the Crusades, Jews were expelled from England in 1290 and from France in 1306 and again in 1394. Many of these Jews moved to eastern Europe. Many Crusaders who stayed in Palestine came to respect Muslims, but Cristian tolerance toward Jews continued.


Many tried to return to their home countries, but in Poland many Jews were murdered after the Holocaust. Others went to Palestine/Israel, the U.S., Canada.


The Jews were kicked out of Israel by the Romans in the year 70 CE. The Romans later renamed it "Palestine". However, contrary to what many people believe, not all Jews were forced out which means that there has been an uninterrupted Jewish presence in Israel for over 3000 years.


In about 77 C.E., the Jewish people revolted against Roman rule in "Palestine" (the Roman name for the land of Israel, named for the traditional enemies of the Jews the Philistines, as an insult to the Jews). They lost. As punishment for revolting and losing, Rome deported the Jews, many as slaves, spreading them through the Roman empire and beyond.


Mainly the US, Palestine and Israel. But other international countries are being involved e.g. UK, France, Russia etc.It started in the late 19Th century when the Zionist movement started with a group of secular European Jews to establish a homeland for the Jews in Palestine. Before that Jews lived in peace with Muslims and Christians in Palestine for about 1300 years (except when the European Crusaders killed all the Jews and Muslims in Jerusalem 900 years ago). Most of the Jews who lived in Palestine till then were Arabs.In short, Arabs and Jews, but there are too many others to list.


Prior to 1948, Palestine had gone through a number of demographic shifts. The Roman sacking of Jerusalem in 70 AD resulted in many Jewish inhabitants being enslaved, although many Jews and Samaritans in the countryside remained. Many Jews moved back to the land over the following centuries as indicated by the many Sephardic villages in Palestine and all over the Middle East. Despite the Muslim conquest, the Crusades, and the Ottomans, the Sephardic Jewish population of Palestine grew, and the Old Jewish Quarter in Jerusalem was often the most populated in the city. In the 19th century, Ashkenazi Jews from Europe began moving to Palestine for reasons religious, zionist, and/or due to anti-semitic pressures in Europe...this is the time many people consider "the return of the Jews to the Holy Land" which fails to recognize the continuing presence of Sephardic Jews. In the 20th century, the Jews of Palestine, considered themselves Palestinians until Israel declared independence in 1948, at which point they considered themselves Israelis. At that time, Jews and Muslim Arabs were in almost equal numbers along with Christians, Druze, etc.


Zionist Jews in Palestine did volunteer to assist the Allies fighting in Europe. The most famous of these was Palestinian-born Hungarian Jew Hana Senesh, who was captured by the Nazis and tortured to death. However, the Arab Palestinians assisted the British in preventing Jews fleeing from Europe any refuge in the British Mandate of Palestine. Additionally, many Arab Palestinians were pro-Nazi during the period and the Grand Mufti of Jerusalem was actually forced out of Palestine due to his pro-Nazi activities.


A:The question relates to the extent of Jewish occupation of the modern lands immediately before the declaration of Israel's independence. Actual births are hard to quantify directly, but there are statistics on population. And of course, births can be estimated on the basis of population and immigration. On eve of Crimean War, (1853-56) about half a million people lived in Palestine, including 20,000 Jews.By 1914, there were an estimated 70,000 Jews in Palestine. Many had arrived in the period since 1882.Following the end of the First world War, the British classified the 800,000 inhabitants of Palestine according to religion: 650,000 Muslims; 80,000 Christians; 60,000 Jews. During the war, almost 40,000 Muslims, more than 10,000 Christians and more than 1,000 Jews had died fighting the Turks.By the end of 1947, there were 600,000 Jews in Palestine. Most were legal and illegal immigrants, and so were not born in the territory.


It refers to the Philistines who also lived in ancient Palestine, and with whom the Jews in ancient times had a less than friendly relationship. Judea referred to only a part of that area where the Jews were a majority. But although many people in today's Israel claim the whole of present-day Palestine as being 'their' ancestral land of Judea and Samaria, the historical fact is the the ancient Jews shared that land with several other tribes at the time (like amongst others, the Philistines and the Samaritans) and were a minority or even hardly present in several parts and cities of ancient Palestine.


Europe re-built, the Soviets expanded, many Jews moved to Palestine or America and the Cold War started


There were already 15,000 Jewish colonists in Palestine. The Great War of 1914-1918 displaced millions of Jews who were living in what had become battlegrounds: a territory called the Pale of Settlement, extending from the Baltic to the Black Sea. Because of their separate religion, customs and language (Yiddish) the Jews of Near and Far Europe had always been subject to unpredictable bouts of violence from their neighbors. The 20th century had started no differently, with the Kishineff Massacre of 1903, and the Russian massacres of 1905. After World War 1 left them homeless and starving, many Jews emigrated back to the ancient homeland in Palestine, until Britain, which controlled Palestine, limited their emigration.


The name is seen by most Jews as an imposition on the territory from its Roman Occupiers who changed the name of the region from Judea to Syria-Palaestina following the Jewish Revolts in the First and Second Centuries C.E. It also conjures up, for many Jews, the current conflict with the Palestinians since they continue to refer to the territory, oftentimes including the current State of Israel, as Palestine.


Palestine has always been Jewish land, the Israelites living in Jerusalem and Jaffa (now tel-Aviv), Tyre and Sidon etc. But after the Crusades, many Jewish slaves went to Europe with their masters. When they were liberated, they stayed. During the Islamic era, the people living in Palestine were separated into Jews, Christians and Muslims. Eventually the other religions thinned out and the majority of the Palestinian population became Muslim (the group we recognize today as Palestine is entirely Muslim, but evidently it has not always been so). After the Holocaust, the Allies felt the Jews should be united in their original home, but it was occupied by the Palestinians. The Allied powers essentially kicked the Palestinians out of Palestine, put the Jews in and called it Israel. -But don't quote me, this isn't my era of speciality.


The Balfour Declaration of 1917 states that the UK supported to establishment of a Jewish state in Palestine. Since Palestine was largely Muslim (including many Arabian Muslims), many Arabians opposed establishing a state for European Jews in an area largely inhabited by Muslims (both those descended from ancient Jews that converted to Islam and other Muslims that had immigrated there over the centuries.


The Balfour Declaration of 1917 states that the UK supported to establishment of a Jewish state in Palestine. Since Palestine was largely Muslim (including many Arabian Muslims), many Arabians opposed establishing a state for European Jews in an area largely inhabited by Muslims (both those descended from ancient Jews that converted to Islam and other Muslims that had immigrated there over the centuries.


Many went to Palestine and formed the new state of Israel. Some emigrated to the United States and some went to South America.


No, because the British weren't letting them arrive in large numbers. Whoever was able to do so, did so.


No. In early Zionist writings, even with right-wingers like Jabotinsky and Trumpeldor, they believed that the Arabs could be integrated as citizens without forcibly relocating them. According to the British Census of Palestine in 1922, there were 590,390 Muslims in Palestine (and 83,694 Jews), whereas there were around 8.5-9 million Jews in Europe. Their thought was that they would simply outpopulate the Arabs, even if only 10% of European Jews migrated to Mandatory Palestine. This would be a method of supplanting the Arab majority without removing them and demonstrates that Zionism does not require ethnic transfers. Of course, not as many Jews migrated as they would have liked and the Holocaust severely diminished the number of European Jews in the early 1940s. As a result, it became less likely that such a demographic drowning could occur. As a result, the Zionists changed tactics and supported a partition plan to get some piece of the land. With a partition plan there would necessarily be population transfers, but it was better than civil war (which ended up happening anyway).


~World Jewry was devastated by the Holocaust. Just under half the Jews on the planet were exterminated; one million of them were children. Once the camps were liberated, those Jews that had managed to survive, and not been starved to death, were left to try and desperately locate any living relatives. In many, many cases, survivors would find that their entire families had been murdered. Those Jews that still lived had nothing, as all their possessions had been taken from them. Many of them tried to get to Palestine, where Palestinian Jews had been living for 3000 years, and had irrigated the land and transformed a bit of the region into a viable and lovely place to live. But tragically, the British, who controlled Palestine, blocked the Jews from getting there. Some of them were even sent back to internment camps in Germany, which was inhumane and almost intolerable for Jews who had just spent years in the death camps. Both the Holocaust survivors, and Jews in Palestine and also in the Arab nations, had to come to terms with what had happened and the fact that there was so much irrational hatred towards them. It was now even more vital to establish an official Jewish homeland in the region of Palestine, as Jews had dreamed of doing for thousands of years. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------



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