50 Hertz Residential Electricity

All of Europe and most of mainland Asia and Africa use 50Hz frequency for their residential electrical needs. Some countries use 50Hz, as they found it economical to maintain and operate power-generating equipment at this frequency.

864 Questions
Appliance Voltage and Travel Issues
Philippines
50 Hertz Residential Electricity

What is the power rating in Hz in Cebu Philippines?

All of the Philippines uses 220 V at 50 Hz.

269270271
50 Hertz Residential Electricity
50 Hertz Industrial Electricity

Why does one pin on a three pin plug get really hot?

Either the conductor connection to that pin of the plug is failing-replace the plug

or- the receptacle is old and loose fitting due to metal fatigue-replace the receptacle

or- the conductor termination at the receptacle is loose-tighten or replace receptacle if damaged. Loose connection creates resistance, which equals heat

Answer for UK and other countries using 13 amp square-pin plug:

I had this happen yesterday in a fused plug and cured the problem by opening the plug, taking out the 13 A fuse and squeezing together the fuse sockets with pliers to make the fuse a tighter fit. Then I put the fuse back in. That did the trick (for a UK 13-amp plug with fuse feeding a 2 kW convector).

203204205
Electrical Wiring
Industrial Electricity and Electronics
50 Hertz Residential Electricity

Diagram on how to wire a single phase contactor?

Diagrams are unavailable in this Q & A format.

<<>>

A good diagram source is Sq D Wiring diagrams, see sources and related links below. This book has a wealth of information for anyone that does electrical control work.

195196197
50 Hertz Residential Electricity
Home Electricity
Electrical Wiring

The hot wire on a 3 prong receptacle?

The hot wire on a 3 prong receptacle is on the right hand side when you face the receptacle straight on.

187188189
50 Hertz Residential Electricity

How many watts 10.5amps?

There is zero watts in 10.5 amps. Watts is the product of amps times volts. Without the voltage value given, this question can not be answered.

183184185
50 Hertz Residential Electricity

How many amps does a fridge freezer need?

Different manufactures have different freezer components. Check the appliance's nameplate to get an accurate amperage of the unit.

175176177
Heating Ventilating and Air Conditioning
Home Electricity
50 Hertz Residential Electricity

What amp breaker for 220volt air conditioner?

Look at the current rating on the AC unit. If under 16 Amps use a 20 A breaker and 12 AWG wire.

156157158
Appliance Voltage and Travel Issues
50 Hertz Residential Electricity

Why does Fluorescent bulb not light and end turns black?

In order to know why fluorescent bulbs turn black at the end, you need to understand how they work. Basically, when you turn on the lighht switch, the ballast sends a spark through the mercury-vapor-filled tube or bulb, depending on design. When it does this, it creates light by activating phosphors that coat the inside of the tube.

Well each time the ballast fires, it creates emissions. These emissins materials then settle on the surface inside the glass. After awhile this material piles up. When it does this, the tube end turns completely black. Not only does the tube end turn black, but the accumulated materials pile up so high that it blocks the electrons that flow into the mercury. When this happens, you will notice the bulb or tube flicker heavily and then burn out.

134135136
Electronics Engineering
Appliance Voltage and Travel Issues
50 Hertz Residential Electricity

Do multimeters need calibration?

All test equipment has to be calibrated. It is calibrated when it comes from the manufacturer but depending on how much the test equipment is used recalibration is usually recommended.

133134135
Electrical Engineering
50 Hertz Residential Electricity

What is the max size single phase motor that will run of a 13 amp domestic socket?

It depends on the type of motor, efficiency, power factor, and loading on the motor. I have a 1 hp motor that draws ~13A full load, ~7A light load. When first switched, it can draw in excess of 30A, but this is a short enough period it normally will not trip the circuit breaker.

A 1 HP motor running at 80% efficiency with a typical 0.7 power factor draws 5½ amps on a 240 v system. A 13-amp UK socket should allow a 2 HP motor.

129130131
Home Electricity
Electrical Engineering
50 Hertz Residential Electricity

What is neutral in electricity?

Good question! In US residential wiring, you have 3 wires feeding your home off the transformer: two hots and neutral. The transformer is a 240V center tapped transformer. The neutral is the center tap. Well, that's all fine and good, but your probably asking "what does that mean?" right about now. Well, since the transformer is 240V, you have 240V in between the two hots. The center tap divides the transformer winding in the middle. So between either hot and neutral you get 120V. Neutral is kind of a return wire for 120V circuits. (I say "kind of" because this is AC, current is flowing in both directons.) Well, why is it called neutral, then? At your main service panel a fourth wire comes into play: ground. Ground is simply a heavy safety wire that goes to a 8ft long copper rod driven into the ground. This ground wire is connected to all metal surfaces you touch (panels, screws, metal junction boxes, metal cases on appliances, etc.) In the main panel (and only the main panel) neutral is bonded to ground. So, while neutral is not ground, when everything is correct it should be "neutral," i.e. it has no potential on it. You cannot assume neutral is grounded or safe to touch, however. By the very nature of wire, if there is a current in a wire there is a potential across it. This potential is usually very small, but is still there. The bigger problem is if the neutral connection becomes very resistive or open. Then the neutral will be live as it cannot "return" the energy to the transformer. (Again, not a totally correct analogy, but it gets the point across.) This is why you shouldn't just bond ground to neutral when you don't have a ground wire at a fixture. When a hot wire goes open, fixtures simply fail to operate. When a neutral goes open, the fixture and the neutral between the fixture and the break go live. The fixture will not work, however, giving people a false sence of security. (No the light is not on, yes it can knock you on your butt.) This is why you want to keep your neutrals in good shape. With the neutral you have two hot wires both capable of producing 120V to neutral. Because the hots have 240V across them (and not 0), one hot goes positive while the other hot goes negative. So, let's say you take two loads with a resistance of 60 ohms. You hook the neutrals of the loads up to neutral, one load to one hot, and the other load to the other hot. How much energy flows through the neutral conductor? 0W. This is because the load is "balanced." The amount of energy flowing through load one is equal to the energy flowing through load two. Let's do a testcase for a specific point in time. Let's say hot 1 for load one is at +60V, and hot two for load two is -60V. Ignoring load two, load one has a current of 1A (60V/60ohms=1A) flowing from hot one through the load and back to the transformer through the neutral. We will call current into the transformer on the neutral positive, and current out of the transformer on the neutral negative. So our neutral has a current of 1A on it for load one. Load two has a current of 1A flowing out of the neutral, through load two, and back into the transformer on hot 2. So, by our signing above, load 2 has a current of -1A on the neutral. To calculate the actual current on the neutral, we add the currents for the two bulbs: 1A + -1A = 0A. Current is flowing out hot one, through bulb one, through bulb two, and back to the transformer on hot 2. Make sense? Now, let's say you have the same setup as above, only load 1 is 30ohms. Well, now the neutral has to carry the extra amp of current. The loads are no longer balanced, so the neutral has to carry the difference. At our 60V test case, the current of load one is now 2A. The neutral current is 2A + -1A = 1A. So, this means that the neutral only carries the difference in power between the two hots. This is also why your neutral doesn't need to be twice as heavy as your hots. Let's say you have 200A service. While you can have 400A of current flowing to 120V appliances all over your home, it is actually +200A to half and -200A to the rest. Your neutral carries 0A, not 400A. Let's go back to our last example, with the 60ohm and 30ohm light bulbs. Let's say some unscroupulous DIYer used the conduit the feed is in for a neutral instead of a dedicated neutral wire. Let's say a clamp to the pipe came off and now we have no neutral connection. Now, we had +60 on hot 1 and -60 on hot 2. So our loads have 120V across them. Now, in this ideal test case, our loads appear as a single 90ohm load to the supply. This means that there is 1.334A flowing through our circuit (120V/90ohms = 1.334A). This also means that load 1 us underpowered by 2/3 of an an amp, while load two is overpowered by one third of an amp. If loads one and two were lightbulbs, bulb one would be dim while bulb two would be brilliant. As both loads have 1.334A flowing through them, load one has 40V across it, while load 2 has 80V across it. Remember, at this point they are both supposed to have 60V across them. Our little set up above is how 240/120V applances work. In, say, your dryer, you would have a third load that is directly across the two hots. Load 3 would be your heater, load 1 would be your timer, and load two could be the light in the drum. If your neutral comes open you could toast your timer or bulb. Most appliance manufacturers actually avoid using both hots for 120V, if possible, for this very reason. You can never be sure, though. Now, the other thing to keep in mind is your whole home functions as a 240V/120V appliance. Load 3 is your heavy appliances, the heaters in your dryer, oven, waterheater, etc.. Loads one and two are all your 120V appliances, light fixtures, etc. So while an open neutral doesn't cause too much of a headache on your dryer, it does cause a big headache in your home. Let's say your service neutral comes open, and you have 1500W of appliances on for load 1, and a 100W porch light on for load 2. That porch light is going to burn out very quick. Now it is impossible to garuantee that load 1 will equal load 2 without being obsessive-compulsive. What you can do is when you plan your load and circuits, try to balance them. This will keep current in the neutral low, which will prevent bad connections from burning open. Also, in the event neutral does fail, if the loads are close to balanced you may only see 90V/150V instead of 10V/230V across your 120V loads. Your appliances my be able to tolerate the former until you notice, they can't tolerate the latter. A resistive neutral is a nasty little problem. It has ultimately the same effects as an open neutral, but is much more subtle. With a resisive neutral, there is a connection, but it is bad. When no current is flowing through the neutral, it appears OK. The more current flows through the neutral, the more potential develops across it by ohms law. This means that if your neutral has 25A flowing through it, and has 2 ohms of resistance, the neutral wire has 50V across it. This also means that your neutral bus in your panel is not at 0V (with respect to the transformer), but is at 50V favoring whichever load (1 or 2, as above) is heavier. This means that the lighter load will be overvoltaged. Also note that resistive neutrals get worse with time. Since our example neutral has 25A at 50V on it, it is dissipating 1250W at some point in the wire. This point is the resistive connection, and will get hot as it dissipates all this power. As it gets hot, it will burn a little further open, and the circle continues. NOTE: This procedure involves probing your service panel or heavy outlet while live. This is dangerous. If you are not comfterable with this, call an electrician. They can check for this quickly and tell you exactly what you need to do to fix it. The easiest way is with a AC voltmeter. Leaving everything on as you normally would. Check the voltage from one hot to neutral, then from the other hot to neutral. This can be done at your panel, at a dryer outlet, at an oven outlet, or at any other 240/120V outlet. If the voltages differ by more than a volt or two, you may have a problem. Call an electrician, as work on your main service must be done by someone licenced, and they have lots of experience with this.

555657
50 Hertz Residential Electricity

What color is the live wire in 230 volt which colour is neutral which colour is ground?

If this is a residential system there are likely two hot wires, black and red. White is neutral and there will be 115 volts between white and either hot. Ground is typically green or a bare wire.

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If this question is really asking about a 50 Hz service - as its Category has been set to - the colors are definitely not as shown in the answer shown above. Those colors are only correct for USA, Canada and countries running a 60 Hz supply service.

Answer for countries in Europe and other world areas running a 50 Hz supply service.

  • the Neutral wire is colored Blue
  • the safety protective Earth or Ground wire is colored Green and Yellow
  • the Live or Hot wire is colored Brown.

<><><>

As always, if you are in doubt about what to do, the best advice anyone should give you is to call a licensed electrician to advise what work is needed.

Before you do any work yourself,

on electrical circuits, equipment or appliances,

always use a test meter to ensure the circuit is, in fact, de-energized.

IF YOU ARE NOT ALREADY SURE YOU CAN DO THIS JOB

SAFELY AND COMPETENTLY

REFER THIS WORK TO QUALIFIED PROFESSIONALS.

111112113
Home Electricity
Electrical Engineering
50 Hertz Residential Electricity

Can twin and earth cable be clipped outside?

If you get any other answer here, you might attempt to do something you shouldn't be doing, and that may cost someone a shock, a home fire, or even their life. Before you do any work yourself,

on electrical circuits, equipment or appliances,

always use a test meter to ensure the circuit is, in fact, de-energized. IF YOU ARE NOT ALREADY SURE YOU CAN DO THIS JOB

SAFELY AND COMPETENTLY

REFER THIS WORK TO QUALIFIED PROFESSIONALS.

979899
50 Hertz Residential Electricity
50 Hertz Industrial Electricity

Why is the live pin getting hot on a three pin plug?

Heat is caused by a current trying to flow through a resistance. What you have is probably a loose connection on one of your screw terminals of the plug creating a higher than normal resistance. Take a screw driver and tighten the screws and see if that makes a difference.

99100101
New Electrical Work
Modification of Old Electrical Work
50 Hertz Residential Electricity

What is the volt of a zero watt bulb?

120 volts.

899091
New Electrical Work
50 Hertz Residential Electricity

How can calculate amps for 12V 50W halogen lamp in 230V input?

It would be pretty much undefined, since the filament of the halogen bulb would fail immediately then there would be an open circuit with no current draw.

<<>>

The formula for current is Amps = Watts/Volts. The lamp itself would draw 4.16 amps. Since the voltage of the lamp is 12 volts there is a internal transformer involved in the fixture itself. It doesn't matter what the input (primary) voltage to the transformer is, so long as it meets the manufacturer's specification as to the proper voltage to operate the fixture.

858687
50 Hertz Residential Electricity
50 Hertz Industrial Electricity

How can you calculate the current carrying capacity of 1 sq mm wire?

4amps can pass in 1sqmm of wire max it is universal.

In the UK 1 sq. mm wire can take 10 amps max according to tables. Cables that become warm in use should be replaced by a thicker gauge.

818283
Appliance Voltage and Travel Issues
50 Hertz Residential Electricity

Can you replace 12v vdc adapter by 12v vac adapter?

No, the 12VDC adapter is specifically designed to charge a DC device. By applying 12VAC to the device could destroy it.

818283
Heating Ventilating and Air Conditioning
50 Hertz Residential Electricity

What is the full-form of HVAC?

Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning

High-voltage alternating current.

656667
Heating Ventilating and Air Conditioning
Appliance Voltage and Travel Issues
50 Hertz Residential Electricity

Differnece between boiler mountings and accessories?

boiler mountings are used to run a boiler in a safe way

ex: safety valve,Water level indicators etc

boiler accessories are used to improve the efficiency of a boiler

ex: economiser,air preheater etc.

717273
Electrical Troubleshooting
50 Hertz Residential Electricity
50 Hertz Industrial Electricity

We have a problem with induced voltage. We measure 220 VAC in the L and 45 to 60 VAC in the N. There is no chance of changing the cable. How to avoid this?

Normally the neutral wire of every circuit is connected to the neutral bus bar in the main breaker panel. Because the neutral bus bar is always connected to ground you should never be able to measure any voltage between the neutral wire and ground.

So, if you are measuring 45 to 60 VAC between the neutral and the ground it could be that the neutral wire has become disconnected at the breaker panel or somewhere in between the panel and the point where you are measuring that voltage.

Assuming the load equipment - an appliance, a motor or whatever - is still connected to the hot and neutral wires, then, if there is no connection to the neutral going back to the power station, in effect you are measuring the line voltage from the hot feed as reduced by the resistance and/or reactive impedance (total reactance) of the load. That could be making 45 to 60 VAC, as read by your meter, appear on the neutral wire coming back from the load.

A simple way to prove if that is the case is to unplug or disconnect all loads - appliances, light fixtures, motors, etc. - from the circuit in question. If you cannot then measure any voltage between the neutral wire and ground the next thing to check is the resistance between the neutral and ground.

First of all switch off the circuit by switching off the breaker at the main panel - or remove the circuit's fuse if it has a fuse and no breaker - and then use the resistance range on a multimeter to measure the resistance between the neutral wire and ground. If it is a very low resistance then an open neutral is not the cause of your problem. If it measures as a very high resistance or an open circuit then your problem is an open neutral.

The reason for the open neutral must be found and that fault must then be corrected urgently.

In the Discussion page to this question please let us know what you found when you did the tests suggested above, and whether or not this advice helped you to locate and fix this problem.

To be able to help you better it is important to know exactly here this circuit is located geographically in the world and to have confirmation whether - as inferred from your question - it is a 50Hz system with one 230V live and one neutral or whether it is actually a 60 Hz system having two 120V hots (+120V and -120V) balanced around neutral.

Then, if necessary we shall have to consider what other reasons could cause the fault you have described but to be able to do so it would help to know exactly what you found when you did the tests described above.

<><><>

As always, if you are in doubt about what to do, the best advice anyone should give you is to call a licensed electrician to advise what work is needed.

Before you do any work yourself,

on electrical circuits, equipment or appliances,

always use a test meter to ensure the circuit is, in fact, de-energized.

IF YOU ARE NOT ALREADY SURE YOU CAN DO THIS JOB

SAFELY AND COMPETENTLY

REFER THIS WORK TO QUALIFIED PROFESSIONALS.

737475
Physics
50 Hertz Residential Electricity

How much total energy does a 60-watt fluorescent light consume?

Take a look at the units:

1 Watt = 1 Joule/Second

A joule is a unit of energy. For example, 1 Joule = .239 calories =

Therefore 60 Watts=60 Joules/Second

So that means for every second, the light consumes 60 Joules. You must know for how long the light will be on to know how much energy will be consumed.

717273
Christmas
50 Hertz Residential Electricity
The Difference Between

What are the advantages of using LED Christmas lights over regular lights?

led uses less eletricy and will last for years

717273
50 Hertz Residential Electricity

How much current does 2.5mm cable carry?

30amps

656667
50 Hertz Residential Electricity

What is a RC-402 made by w h mandolyn ltd?

Prise telecommandee

656667

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