Australia Natural Disasters

Australia - a land of droughts and flooding rains, cyclones, and bushfires. All about Australia's worst natural disasters and their effects.

Asked in Hurricanes Typhoons and Cyclones, Australia Natural Disasters

What was the time and date of Cyclone Larry?

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Cyclone Larry, like all cyclones, began as a low pressure system, and it first began to be monitored by Australia's Bureau of Meteorology as a low pressure system on 16 March 2006. It developed into a cyclone two days later, on 18 March. Cyclone Larry then crossed the Queensland coast between between 6:20am and 7:20am on 20 March 2006.
Asked in Earthquakes, Australia Natural Disasters

What did the Newcastle earthquake do to the structure of Newcastle?

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The earthquake that struck Newcastle, Australia on 28 December 1989 caused significant damage throughout the city. 35,000 homes, 147 schools and 3,000 other structures in the region collapsed. The most damage happened at the Newcastle Workers Club when walls and multiple floors collapsed, dropping 300 tonnes of concrete onto the ground-floor car park, killing 9 people.
Asked in Australia Natural Disasters

How long did the Black Saturday bushfires in Victoria last?

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The "Black Saturday" bushfires in Victoria officially lasted almost 5 weeks - from their beginning on 7 February to 12 March when Victorian authorities announced that the last of the worst bushfires which caused the most death and devastation were under control. However, smaller fires continued, controlled, for many months after that.
Asked in Ecosystems, Victoria, Australia Natural Disasters

What day did the Victorian bushfires start?

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The Victorian bushfires began on Saturday, 7 February 2009. This has now come to be known as "Black Saturday".
Asked in Rain and Flooding, Australia Natural Disasters

Why did the 2011 Australian floods happen?

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The main reason why the 2010-2011 floods happened in Australia is, quite simply, because of the unusual amount of rain. Australia spends many years in drought, often caused by the El Niño effect. When an El Niño occurs, changes in sea surface temperatures cause a shift in air pressure which, in turn, can result in climatic anomalies, such as severe droughts in Australia. These years are punctuated by years of normal rainfall, but occasionally, Australia gets the opposite to an El Niño, which is La Niña. This means that weather conditions, etc, are in reverse to those seen during El Niño, and Australia experiences far more rain than usual. Australia had been coming out of an El Niño for some time, which means that many parts of Australia had seen gradually increasing rainfall. The rainfall recorded in September 2010 made it Australia's wettest month overall in 110 years. Queensland already experienced flooding in early 2009 (at the same time that southern Australia had the terrible Black Saturday bushfires), and higher than normal rainfall in 2010, increasing towards the end of the year. By then, the ground was simply too saturated to hold any more water. Add to that the effects of the cyclone which crossed the north Queensland coast at Christmas time, bringing excessive rainfall to north and central Queensland, and the ground was waterlogged. (A similar pattern led to the Brisbane floods of 1974.) Radar images show how large the cyclone system was, even though it was only a category one cyclone, the lowest grade. Low wind speeds do not necessarily mean low rainfall, and in this case the cyclone brought large amounts of rainfall right along the coast. Some of the water runoff from the north flowed down through the inland river system; some of the rainfall fell into the catchment areas of coastal rivers further south. The rivers broke their banks more easily, and there was nowhere for the excess water to go. Rain continued to fall heavily throughout early January. On 10 January 2011, Toowoomba, a city which sits at an elevation of 700m at the top of the Great Dividing Range, received 150 mm of rain within a 40 minute period. The ground could not hold any more water. Water collected along the escarpment at the top of the range and created the wall of water, a 7m high inland "tsunami", that went through the city and down the range. This wall of water rushed through Lockyer Valley to the catchment areas of the main dam that protects the city of Brisbane from flooding, sending its capacity to 190%. The gates had to be opened, sending the equivalent of two Sydney Harbour's worth of water into the Brisbane River each day. This is largely why Brisbane and Ipswich flooded. An inquiry into the release of water from Wivenhoe is underway. Many of the river systems further west which were affected by the flooding which had occurred regularly through December and January feed into the Darling River, which then leads to the Murray River. The Darling River catchment, and catchments east of this, received more rainfall than its capacity can take, and as the floodwaters moved downstream, communities in New South Wales, western Victoria and South Australia were affected as well.
Asked in Australia, Australia Natural Disasters, Drought

How does a Australian drought effect the community around it?

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There are so many effects of drought in Australia. To determine how widespread the reach of drought is, consider the following. other areas are dependent on the areas where drought is an issue. services that don't seem to be related to a lack of rainfall might be supported by the reduced spending power of those who are affected. cities rely on the rural sector for much of their basic food items. reduced availability of food items results in increased prices for both consumers and producers increased prices affect businesses, resulting in reduced profits, and ultimately layoffs and loss of employment drought results in increased desertification, i.e. once fertile land becomes desert, a situation from which the land rarely recovers water and its availability and quality affects everyone, even city people when water restrictions are enforced Australian primary industries rely on good rainfall, and exports and the wealth of Australia as a whole are impacted. droughts can ruin the financial security of many and the resultant stresses affect people mentally and also can damage personal relationships. Watching for rain that doesn't eventuate and seeing crops and animals dying without being able to help is devastating. See also the related question.
Asked in Australia Natural Disasters

When were the Black Saturday bushfires in Victoria?

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"Black Saturday" marked the start of massive bushfires in Victoria, Australia, which eventually killed 173. The fires began on 7 February 2009, and continued for almost five weeks. On 12 March Victorian authorities announced that the last of the worst bushfires which caused the most death and devastation were under control. However, smaller fires continued, controlled, for many months after that.
Asked in Australia, Australia Natural Disasters

What caused the Canberra bushfires?

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The Canberra bushfires of 2003 were started by lightning strikes in the Kosciuszko National Park to the west of the ACT. These spread to the adjoining Brindabella and Namadgi National Parks near Canberra and a state of emergency was declared in the city itself when, at 2.45pm on 18 January 2003, the fires reached the outskirts of Canberra and began encroaching upon the city. The fires were exacerbated by the heat and dry conditions, a common problem in southern inland Australia in summer.
Asked in Australia Natural Disasters

What towns did Victoria's Black Saturday bushfires affect?

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The towns destroyed or severely damaged in the February 2009 bushfires were: Marysville Kinglake Narbethong Hazeldene Kilmore Yea Churchill Narre Warren Other towns and regions affected, but not severely damaged, include: Beechworth Flowerdale Horsham Coleraine Weerite Bunyip Dargo Wilson's Promontory and the West Gippsland area Part of the city of Bendigo was also badly affected by separate fires, still adding over 30 to the death toll. Many more small towns were affected and some of these are listed at the websites below.
Asked in Rain and Flooding, Australia, Australia Natural Disasters

How many devastating floods have happened in Australia?

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There have been numerous floods in Australia's history which have caused untold devastation to lives and property. Not all are mentioned below. On 25 June 1852, a torrent of water swept down the already flooded Murrumbidgee River, hitting the town of Gundagai and killing 89. There was a second, higher flood in 1853, and the town was relocated to its current site on the hill above the river. 44 people were killed in Tasmania in April 1929 as a result of heavy rain and flooding. Some of these deaths occurred when the Briseis Dam on the Cascade River collapsed, flooding the town of Derby. Heavy rain in the southeastern region of Australia in 1952. This particularly affected Victoria's Gippsland and southern coastal NSW. In February 1955, a monsoon depression intensified and moved south from Queensland, accompanied by torrential rainfall. About 15,000 people were evacuated from the NSW town of Maitland due to rising floodwaters from the Hunter River. 1600 were evacuated from nearby Singleton. The floods moved down the Macquarie River to Dubbo, causing the evacuation of another 4000, and as far west as Warren and Narromine. When the Namoi and Gwydir Rivers flooded, this devastated the towns of Moree and Narrabri. These floods killed 25. Western Queensland and northwest NSW were badly hit by floods in 1990, which especially hit the towns of Charleville and Nyngan. Six people died in these floods which also flooded 2000 homes. Queensland's southeast has seen several floods, with arguably the most devastating occurring in 1974 and 2011. Much of Queensland was affected in both these years, nad there was also severe floods in central Queensland in 2009. While Queensland was beginning to recover from the floods early in 2011, Victoria was hit by floodwaters, a combination of the waters moving downstream along the Darling River at the same time as the state received heavy rainfall. The rainfall system in Queensland also affected northern New South Wales.
Asked in Australian Capital Territory and Canberra, Forests, Australia Natural Disasters

How much land was burnt in the Canberra bushfire?

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The Australian Capital Territory, where the Canberra bushfires occurred, covers 2,359 square kilometres. During the bushfires of January 2003, almost 70% of the ACT's pasture land, forests and nature parks were burnt. That works out to 1,651 square kilometres. This does not include the 500 homes destroyed.
Asked in Australia, Australia Natural Disasters

How did the Black Saturday bushfire start?

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In February 2010, the Royal Commission into the Black Saturday bush fires officially blamed faulty power lines and an incorrect fitting which caused the power lines to fail for starting the worst of the fires, the one which killed 119 at Kinglake. Arsonists were also partially to blame, though no formal blame has been cast on them. Each place where someone's life was lost was treated as a crime scene, because the authorities said the speed with which the fires started and then took off was more likely to have occurred as a result of being deliberately lit. Fire criminologists and special investigations task forces confirmed this. Carelessness was another cause: a lit cigarette, tossed from a passing car or truck, was blamed for starting the major bushfire that hit Bendigo, destroying 50 houses and killing two people. At Horsham, in western Victoria, a faulty power line was found to be the cause of the fire which began in that region. Arson has, at least, been ruled out in this instance. It is believed arcing began due to a faulty insulator, resulting in showers of sparks falling to the ground and igniting the dry grass. Similarly, the survivors of the Kinglake fire, which wiped out the entire town and killed so many, launched class action as that fire also appeared to have been started by faulty power lines. Victoria and the southern Australia region had recently experienced one of their hottest summers on record, with a heatwave over parts of Victoria and South Australia. This was on top of a drought which had lasted a dozen years. This had dried up the vegetation, making it like tinder in a fireplace - easily ignited and easily spread. Spot fires also occurred as strong, gusting winds - some hurricane-force - carried blazing embers beyond the fire fronts: these fires quickly fanned into larger fires.
Asked in Australia Natural Disasters, The Difference Between, Natural Disasters

What is the difference between dust storms and sandstorms?

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Theoretically, a sandstorm has larger particles, being made up of grains of sand. Sandstorms occur in desert areas, where winds pick up and carry sand particles. These are especially suffocating and dangerous, and the sand can bury people and houses. Dust storms can occur wherever the soil has been dried and exposed, and tend to occur during hot summers and long drought periods. Deaths during a dust storm are more likely to occur through asthma and related lung conditions.
Asked in Hurricanes Typhoons and Cyclones, Australia Natural Disasters, Emergency Preparedness

What do you do before during and after a typhoon?

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BEFORE You should listen to radio announcements You should not go outside your house during the typhoon Turn off electronic gadgets Check if all your family members/neighbors are inside their houses AFTER \Check at your window if the typhoon is leaving the area or NOT
Asked in Australia, Australia Natural Disasters

How many bushfires occur in a year in Australia?

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According to the Australian Government's website, and backed by data from the Australian Institute of Criminology, there are roughly 52,000 bushfires every year. Actual figures may vary from 46,000 to 62,000 per year.
Asked in Australia, Victoria, Australia Natural Disasters

What were some of the environmental impacts of the Black Saturday bush fire in Victoria Australia?

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The Victorian bush fire hit most of Victoria's bushland, but it is the environment that was hit the hardest. As one of the worst burn-offs that Australia has seen, it has obviously had a great affect on the wildlife. The Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals has estimated that wildlife injury and death would tally more than a million. Many of the surviving wildlife suffered burns and other injuries. A species of possum, the Leadbeater's Possum, had its only known habitat burned, putting it under extreme threat of extinction. Of course, the plants in the bush were most affected, and this has had, and will have, impact on the prospects of the many animals who need the vegetation for survival (like koalas and possums), who have all lost vast areas of habitat. Also, regrowth in the burned areas will affect run-off rates, availability of water, and infrastructure, such as dams, and dam maintenance for decades. The greater environment has not gone unscathed either with evidence of smoke from the fires, found high over Antarctica.
Asked in Personal Safety and Security, Australia Natural Disasters

Why Are Bushfires So Dangerous?

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Bushfires are dangerous because they are uncontrollable. The sap inside gum trees superheats and ignites, causing the tops of the trees to explode, and this in itself feeds the fire even further. Bushfires can create massive infernos that move at tremendous speed, with sometimes little warning to those in their path, resulting in deaths. The recent bushfires in Victoria literally consumed whole towns in their path, killing 200 and leaving thousands homeless.
Asked in Meteorology and Weather, Ecosystems, Australia Natural Disasters, Drought

Which places does the Australian drought affect?

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As at October 2007, much of the southern and central parts of the continent are experiencing drought conditions. See the Web Link to the left for the October 2007 drought statement. The site will have up to date information on other pages if past this date. There are also links within the page to related information that may be helpful.
Asked in Conditions and Diseases, Care of Horses, Tigers, Australia Natural Disasters

You think you have problems with fainting and the doctors do not know why. Someone said it could be that you are going to sleep and it can happen while doing anything at any time any ideas?

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You may not be getting enough REM sleep at night, even if you spend 8 hours in bed. Request a sleep study test to see if there is an issue there. My good friend would nod off mid-sentence. He ended up with a C-Pap and no longer has any issues at all.
Asked in Hurricanes Typhoons and Cyclones, Australia Natural Disasters

What are the economic impacts of tropical cyclones in Australia?

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There are numerous economic effects of tropical cyclones felt by Australians when these cyclones occur. They include: * Reduced income for businesses affected by damage resulting from the cyclone. Farmers suffer from crop damage or livestock losses, and on Australia's eastern coast, this specifically affacts Australia's specialised tropical fruit industry. * Local businesses may have building damage and lose some of their produce. This drives up prices of goods and supplies because they have to be brought in from further away, so the businesses have to pay more for transportation costs. * Sometimes, businesses close down and people are left unemployed. * Tourism stops for the short term. * There are enormous costs - sometimes hundreds of millions of dollars - involved in rebuilding infrastructure and damaged buildings. An example of loss of income and industries unique to a particular area occurred when a cyclone hit the Broome region of northwest Australia on 22 April 1887; a pearling fleet bore the brunt of the storm when thirteen vessels were destroyed and 140 people killed. Another example was Cyclone Mahina, which hit north Queensland on 4 March 1899, and resulted in the greatest death toll of any natural disaster in Australia. It hit a pearling fleet of around 100 vessels which was anchored at Bathurst Bay, driving the boats onto the shore or onto the Great Barrier Reef. 307 people were killed in this one act alone, and only 4 sailors survived A good economic effect can be the development of a new, modern infrastructure and buildings which are better equipped to withstand future cyclones. Redevelopment of completely devastated cyclone-ridden regions can improve property values.
Asked in Rain and Flooding, Australia Natural Disasters

How many people died in the 1974 Brisbane floods?

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16 people were killed in the 1974 floods in Brisbane, Queensland.
Asked in Missouri, Volcanoes, Australia Natural Disasters

Where is the closest volcano to Missouri?

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That would be in Missouri. The Johnson Shut-ins were created by a volcano. The Ozark Mountains and the Saint Francios Mountians are laced with some of the oldest valcanos in the world, so it makes it hard to trace them but they are there, non active of course!