Eastern Europe

Eastern Europe is the eastern half of the European continent which had been aligned with the Soviet Union during the Cold War. It is made up primarily of Slavic Countries, Hungary, and the Baltic States. The post-Soviet transition for democracy has been successful in some Eastern European States, but more difficult in those closer to Russia.

2,436 Questions
World War 2
USSR in WW2
Cold War
Eastern Europe

What did America do when Stalin decided he wanted to control Eastern European countries and make them satellite nations?

The United States made the CIA and sent a bunch of soldiers to reinforce the borders. The CIA killed KGB agents and the military stopped an invasion.

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Eastern Europe

What mountains ate the dominant mountain system of eastern Europe?

they are the Carpathian Mountains

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Soviet Union (USSR)
Eastern Europe

How did the soviet union gain and keep control of Eastern Europe?

Some was gained after WW2 was won some may have been taken by force.

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Eastern Europe

Eastern Europe after World War 2?

became the Soviet-bloc.

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Poland
Eastern Europe

Is Poland in Western Europe or in Eastern Europe?

Poland is in Eastern Europe.

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Eastern Europe

The development of coercive labor systems in eastern Europe was indicative of?

eastern Europe's growing economic subordination to the west.

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Europe
Eastern Europe

What are the most beautiful central and eastern European cities?

Prague, Vienna, Salzburg, Munich, Lucerne, Bern, Budapest

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Eastern Europe

Why does eastern Europe have more pollution than western Europe?

Becuse Easter Europe was the birthplace of industrial revolution and still kinda is. therfore its is more polluted

*Actually the birthplace of the Industrial Revolution was England in Western Europe. The IR is a reason for the pollution problems facing Eastern Europe, but not the distinguishing factor between East and West. The reason Eastern Europe faces pollution issues to a greater extent is due to it's communistic history. The government controlled the industries that were attributing to the pollution so there was a conflict of interest in dealing with the pollution caused and nothing to keep it in check.

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Eastern Europe

What impact did the Berlin Airlift have on the people of Germany and Eastern Europe?

The Berlin Airlift did more than anything else to encourage pro-Western. The vast majority of Germans expected the West to do some kind of deal with Stalin and were most impressed by the Western response.

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Eastern Europe

What Was a military alliance of the Soviet-Dominated countries of Eastern Europe?

The Warsaw Pact

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Eastern Europe

By 1700 which was NOT one of the dominant powers of Eastern Europe?

Chile was not one of the dominant powers.

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World War 2
Eastern Europe

Why were eastern European nations dominated by Communism after World War 2?

because the others thought they were more important and yeah.....

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Eastern Europe

The Trans-Siberian Railway covered a distance from Eastern Europe to?

If you are on Odysseyware: The Pacific

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History, Politics & Society
Soviet Union (USSR)
Eastern Europe

What is the difference between the Soviet Union and the soviet bloc?

The Soviet Union was the nation called the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (the USSR) that had consisted of about 15 separate nation states such as Russia, Estonia, Latvia, Belorussia, Ukraine and others. It was a single nation.

The Soviet bloc was a group of nations who allied themselves with the Soviet Union because their political nature was similar to that of the Soviet Union. Such nations were Bulgaria, East Germany, Czechoslovakia and others. It was not a single nation but a group of individual nations.

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Eastern Europe

What are the major mountain ranges in eastern Europe?

Major mountain ranges in Eastern Europe include the Caucuses, the Urals, and the Transylvanian Alps.

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Eastern Europe

Why is eastern Europe a shatterbelt?

It is called the shatterbelt because it is a zone of persistent splintering and fracturing

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Eastern Europe

What is the name of Oil Pan of Eastern Europe?

remania mountains

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Perguntas em Portugues
Languages and Cultures
Countries, States, and Cities
English to Portuguese
Eastern Europe

What languages are spoken in eastern European countries?

Indo-European Languages Balto-Slavic Family Vijay John and Jonathan Slocum The Balto-Slavic languages are spoken mainly in Eastern Europe; they were not attested until late in the first millennium AD.

There are two major groups: Baltic, and Slavic. These two are generally agreed to be closely related to one another and, as a whole, they have always been spoken in the same geographic area, ranging from what is now eastern Germany to modern-day Russia. However, Baltic languages have exchanged "popularity" with Slavic languages: Baltic languages were originally spoken over a much wider area than is now the case, and Slavic languages were originally spoken in a much smaller area. Nowadays, the territory occupied by speakers of Slavic languages has expanded considerably, whereas the territory dominated by speakers of Baltic languages has shrunk to a very small region encompassed by the countries of Latvia and Lithuania.

Currently there are only two surviving Baltic languages, Latvian and Lithuanian, both from the East Baltic sub-group; the entire West Baltic sub-group, most notably Prussian, is extinct. But there are many surviving Slavic languages, and these are divided into three sub-groups: West Slavic, East Slavic, and South Slavic. The earliest attested Slavic language, dated to the 9th century AD, is Old Church Slavonic, an extinct Slavic language that has influenced modern Slavic languages to varying degrees as discussed later.

Baltic The earliest known writings in Baltic languages were quite recent compared to the earliest writings in other Indo-European languages. However, it is known that the Baltic languages were spoken as early as the late Bronze Age from Poland to the Ural Mountains in western Russia. They seem to have been very influential in Eastern Europe, and they were involved in trade with other peoples. For example they interacted with Finnic peoples to the north, who borrowed many words from Baltic languages; these words included agricultural or farming-related terms, kinship terms, and technologies. Although the Baltic languages are now spoken primarily in Latvia and Lithuania, many rivers in Eastern Europe have Baltic names to this day.

The territory occupied by Baltic languages became smaller due to Gothic and Slavic migrations and, later, to invasions by the Teutonic Knights (German crusaders). The Lithuanians controlled a large empire, the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, from 1362 to 1569. The earliest written materials in the Baltic languages appeared only after this empire collapsed, but Baltic languages (especially Lithuanian) preserve a number of early Indo-European characteristics that have been lost in other Indo-European languages. Therefore, although the Baltic languages were attested very late, their conservative nature makes them useful in Indo-European historical linguistics.

West Slavic The West Slavic languages are divided into three groups: Sorbian, Lechitic, and Czech-Slovak. The Sorbian languages are minority languages spoken in eastern Germany. The Lechitic languages are spoken in and around Poland and include Kashubian (a Pomeranian language, i.e. spoken on the border between Germany and Poland), Silesian (on the border between Poland and the Czech Republic), and Polish, which is the third most widely-spoken Slavic language today (and the most widely-spoken West Slavic language); other Lechitic languages were formerly spoken in Germany but are now extinct.

The main Czech-Slovak languages are Czech and Slovak, which did not become distinct languages until the 15th century. West Slavic languages are those that have been least influenced by Old Church Slavonic; this is because Old Church Slavonic spread from the region of the Southern Slavs, and Hungary separated speakers of Western Slavic languages from that region. In addition, Old Church Slavonic was the liturgical (religious) language of the East Orthodox Church. Since speakers of West Slavic languages were converted to Roman Catholicism rather than to East Orthodox Christianity, Latin was generally used as their liturgical language instead of Old Church Slavonic. The earliest full-length texts in West Slavic languages generally seem to date to the 14th century.

East Slavic The East Slavic languages include Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, and Rusyn (a lesser-known language spoken in many parts of Eastern Europe). Russian is the most widely-spoken Slavic language, and Ukrainian is the second most widely-spoken. However, just as some West Slavic languages are now extinct, not all East Slavic languages have survived. Two examples of extinct East Slavic languages are Russian Church Slavonic and Old East Slavic. Russian Church Slavonic is a modified East Slavic version of Old Church Slavonic that was originally used as a liturgical language, and Old East Slavic is the ancestor of all modern East Slavic languages.

Overall, the East Slavic languages are more closely related than those of any other Slavic group. East Slavic languages were so strongly influenced by Old Church Slavonic that they did not become distinct until the 13th century at the earliest, as literature in East Slavic per se is dated to ca. 1200 in Kiev, which was the capital of the old Russian (or East Slavic) state of Rus' and is now the capital of Ukraine, while there were no large numbers of literary works in distinct East Slavic languages until about 1600. South Slavic Modern South Slavic languages can be divided into two groups: Western and Eastern.

Western South Slavic languages include Serbo-Croatian (Serbian/Croatian/Bosnian) and Slovenian; Eastern South Slavic languages include Bulgarian and Macedonian (not genetically related to the Greek dialect of Alexander the Great). These languages are mostly spoken in the Balkans, especially in Bulgaria and [what was] Yugoslavia. Unlike Serbo-Croatian and Slovenian, Bulgarian and Macedonian have some linguistic features borrowed from non-Slavic Balkan languages, particularly Greek and Albanian. Like the East Slavic languages, the South Slavic languages were strongly influenced by Old Church Slavonic.

In fact Old Church Slavonic is often considered to be a South Slavic language, though it also seems to be closely related to the Proto-Slavic language from which all Slavic languages descended. The first modern South Slavic language to be written appears to be Slovenian, in the 10th century.

Recommended Reading

  • Comrie, Bernard, "Slavonic Languages," pp. 322-328 in The World's Major Languages, ed. by Bernard Comrie. New York: Oxford University Press, 1987.
  • Eckert, Rainer, Elvira-Julia Bukeveciute, and Friedhelm Hinze. Die baltischen Sprachen: Eine Einfuehrung. Leipzig, Berlin, Munich: Langenscheidt Verlag Enzyklopaedie, 1994.
  • Fortson, Benjamin W., IV. Indo-European Language and Culture: An Introduction. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004.
  • Mallory, J.P., and D.Q. Adams. The Oxford Introduction to Proto-Indo-European and the Proto-Indo-European World. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 2006.
  • Schmalstieg, William R., "The Baltic Languages," pp. 454-479 in The Indo-European Languages, ed. by Anna Giacalone Ramat and Paolo Ramat. London and New York: Routledge, 1998.

    italic


Mostly Slavic languages such as Russian, Hungarian, Czech, Slovak, and others, almost every country has its own unique language which may or may not be the offical language.
Languages spoken in Eastern Europe include (but are not limited to) Albanian, Armenian, Belarusian, Bosnian, Bulgarian, Croatian, Czech, Georgian, Greek, Hungarian, Macedonian, Polish, Romanian, Russian, Serbian, Slovak, Slovenian, Turkish, & Ukrainian.

Most of these languages sound 'Russian' to westerners.

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History of Europe
Decade - 1920s
Eastern Europe

The only eastern European state that retained its parliamentary government through the turbulent 1920's and 1930's was?

Czechoslovakia remained a democracy when the countries around it became dictatorships.

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Eastern Europe

What are the names of the prairie regions of eastern europe?

steppe

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War and Military History
Germany in WW2
USSR in WW2
Cold War
Soviet Union (USSR)
Eastern Europe

What was the agreement between the Soviet Union and seven eastern European nations called?

The Warsaw Pact.

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Communism
Eastern Europe

When did East Europe move away from communism?

In the late 1980's. It was in 1989 when the Berlin Wall fell that was death of communism.

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Berlin Wall
Communism
Eastern Europe

How did the iron curtain affect lives of Eastern Europe?

The people who lived in Eastern Europe were largely, if not completely, cut off from the Western world. They also did not have many of the basic freedoms we take for granted.

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Eastern Europe

How did they spread communism in eastern Europe?

It was imposed on them when the USSR occupied them at the end of WW2.

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Decade - 1950s
Eastern Europe

What was the political situation in the countries of Eastern Europe during the 1950s?

These countries had communist governments that were controlled by the Soviet Union.

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