Nursing

Nurses are professional healthcare providers that work alone or collaboratively with doctors to promote and provide holistic health care.

Asked in Resume Writing, Job Applications, Nursing

Sample nursing career objective?

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To specialize in emergency nursing and to further developing excellent patient care skills and clinical knowledge. Answer- The main objective of nursing career are protection, promotion, and optimization of health and abilities, prevention of illness and injury, alleviation of suffering through the diagnosis and treatment of human response, and advocacy in the care of individuals, families, communities, and populations.
Asked in Literature and Language, Baby Names, Nursing

What are good nurse names?

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Denise Christina Debbie Abigail(Abby) Georgia Savannah Angela(Angie)
Asked in Nursing, Job Descriptions

How much annual leave does a nurse get?

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It depends on the job, some hospitals offer 120 hours or you earn a certain amount of time dependent on how often you work.
Asked in Job Interviews, Nursing

How do you answer describe being flexible in a job interview?

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As a recruiter, I would consider an applicant flexible if they are versatile, adaptable, and have open availability. To have the ability to work any task, position, schedule or environment assigned to them. With the proper training of course.
Asked in Nursing

Can female nurse do Male urinary catheterization?

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Any trained Nurse, Male or Female can do the catheterization.
Asked in Health, Nursing

What is functional nursing?

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It focuses on tasks & jobs. Each team member has certain tasks & jobs assigned to them. They can give all medications, give all treatments. The nursing assistants are allowed to give baths, make beds, & serve meals. After tasks are completed each person must report all observations to the head nurse.
Asked in Salary and Pay Rates, Property Law, Twitter, Nursing

How much do licensed conveyancers earn?

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Salaries for trainees start at around £15,000. After qualification and three years' experience, the salary range for is around £25,000 - £40,000 and salaries for senior management posts are £35,000 - £55,000. Partners or owners of conveyancing firms may earn £60,000 or more
Asked in Nursing, Job Descriptions, Obstetrics & Gynecology

What does obstetrics nurse do?

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For the source and more detailed information concerning your request, click on the related links section (U.S. Department of Labor) indicated directly below this answer section.
Asked in Conditions and Diseases, Asthma, Nursing

What is a nursing diagnosis for rsv?

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Impaired gas exchange r/t respiratory secretions AEB fine crackles on auscultation, frequent productive cough, etc.
Asked in Salary and Pay Rates, Nursing

How much do RN earn in New Jersey?

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According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics the estimated mean annual wage for registered nurses as of May 2008 is, $65,00. This would amount to $31.31 per hour.
Asked in Nursing

The theory of sister carol agravante?

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Hindi ko alam kya ko nga tinatanong?
Asked in Nursing

Do all nurses give injections?

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In NZ only those who have trained & registered as a Nurse are permitted by law to call themself a Nurse. All Nurses can give injections. Joy E Millar RN
Asked in Nursing

How fast can you run lipids into a peripheral line?

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Tough question, lipids are isotonic, they can be delivered by both PICC, or other central venus line, and by peripheral line. I have found this information: According to Intravenous infusion therapy for nurses: principles & practice by Dianne L. Josephson: The usual dosage of parenteral lipids should not exceed 2.5 g/kg, with carbohydrate and amino acids comprising the remaining caloric input. The initial rate of lipid infusion should be 1mL/min for the first 15 to 30 minutes of infusion. The rate may then be increased to 2 mL/min. No more than 500 ml should be administered to an adult in the first 24 hours of therapy. Thereafter, the rate should not exceed 2.5g/kg/day. Watch for destabilization of lipid emulsion by excessive acidity and improper electrolyte content. I hope this helps
Asked in Salary and Pay Rates, Nursing

What does a life flight nurse earn?

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An average on $62,000 a year in the United States!
Asked in Nursing

What does a diploma in nursing mean?

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A diploma nurse has a two year degree or associates of science in nursing (ASN)
Asked in Nursing

Who is known as the father of modern nursing?

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Florence Nightingale is known as the Father of Modern Nursing.
Asked in Nursing, General Educational Development (GED)

Can you get into a nursing school with a GED?

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If you do not meet the admissions requirements of the four year colleges and universities, you can start with the community college. In addition, many community colleges over a registered nurse program.
Asked in Nursing

Do nursing homes allow pets?

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Most nursing homes do allow pets, I have seen nursing homes with birds. But never have I seen one with a dog or cat. I would suggest talking to the nursing home about this question. They will have the best answer for you. ** ***Very rarely do nursing homes allow people to bring their own pets. There would be great problems with cats and dogs fighting or chasing each other and it would be very expensive but if someone did set up such a place, I'm sure they'd make a fortune but a lot of nursing homes now have a resident cat or dog, or both, with a very gentle temperament, as shared pets, who wander about and visit the elderly or sick. Often, there are volunteers who bring very quiet, placid dogs to visit, weekly. Retired greyhounds are very popular, as they have heads at the perfect height for people in wheelchairs and they don"t jump on people. Labradors are popular, as are little dogs, that can sit on the beds and not be too heavy. Resident cats have got a lot of news coverage of late, as a number of cats appear to know, before the staff, that someone is very close to death. A number of cats have been known to insist on curling up with an individual, and not moving until they've quietly passed away.
Asked in Nursing

Is a nurse blue collar worker?

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Nursing is considered white collar, because of the amount of education required for the job. Blue collar work is typically that of skilled workers with little or no education.
Asked in First Aid, Doctors, Nursing

Why does a wound tingle?

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Tingling or itching uses the same neural pathways as pain. So a tingling sensation is basically a low-firing pain sensation.
Asked in Salary and Pay Rates, Nursing

How much money does a nurse earn?

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From the U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics: Median annual wages of registered nurses were $62,450 in May 2008. The middle 50 percent earned between $51,640 and $76,570. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $43,410, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $92,240. Determining where you might fit in within this range results from a variety of factors including an RN's overall experience, the school they attended or the state where you work (there are a lot of great answers on this below.) We've written an article that provides detailed information as well as useful visuals on the topic , see the related link for Career Numbers: How much do nurses earn? (below) More advice from the nurses out there: It depends on where and what type of nursing. A staff nurse starts off in the hospital making about $18,000 a year. As a traveler, you will make about $30,000 a year. I have seen people clear over $100,000 a year, but on average about $35,000-40,000. You will earn more money if you job-hop every two years or so between companies/hospitals. Competitive raises rise much faster than annual merit raises (which are usually less than a dollar/hr). My sister-in-law chose to stay with one hospital over the past 15 years while I've moved around based on salaries (every 2-4 years). She makes $55,000/yr and I make $90,000/yr for the same work. Hospitals are rarely loyal or offer more incentives to long-term employees. Furthermore, they rarely offer retirement benefits - other than matching your 401k benefits, which you can move with you from job to job. Find any long-term nurse and it's almost guaranteed that a new nurse working beside her (with less than 3 years' experience) is paid more per hour. I am an RN in PA. I started out 9 years ago at 19.00/hr. I work in a nonprofit long-term care skilled nursing facility (SNIFF unit). This is my second place of employment as a nurse. This past year (2007) I grossed $83,000. I make 34/hr as a nurse manager. I work 9 days in a 2-week pay period, (72 hours) and work the last 8 in overtime after 8-hour shifts, for which I receive time and a half. In addition, I do an hour here or there for overtime - it adds up. I have 4 weeks' paid vacation, excellent health and dental, 8 sick days, 2 personal days/year. The LPN's at work make from 20-25/hr depending on experience. The RN's make 30-37/hr depending on the shift. These are the rates in this PA suburban area. In California, on average, a CNA (nursing assistant) makes $9-14 per hour, more being made on night shift and with experience. An LVN gets paid approximately $20-30 per hour. The ones I know make $22-$25. An RN makes $30 plus per hour. The ones I know make about $35. This is at real hospitals, doing home health, there are always places where you can make less. But in CA I would say that this is average. (there are a lot of nurses in my family and I am going to be one.) My wife is a nurse and she teaches nurses on review classes in passing the CGFNS and NCLEX. I remember a story from her where one of her students encountered this question from an immigration official at the US Embassy. This questions she says is usually asked by an immigration officer to try to find out if indeed the nurse knows how much she will be making if she goes to a certain state in the USA. So my wife always advises her students to always find out from their prospective employers the rate of salary they will be paid. Of course the basic salary for nurses differs from state to state. It is important that the applicant knows the prevailing rates in a certain state or job field. I worked in payroll at a nursing home until July of this year; we started LPN's at $17 per hour with less than 1 year of experience, and RN's with less than 1 year of experience were started at $20 per hour. This is in the Cleveland area. Wages for nurses depend on the area and where you work (nursing facility, hospital, etc.). I think it also depends on where in a hospital a nurse works. I started out as an RN with a B.S.N. in 2003 in Nashville, Tennessee. There was a sign on bonus (like 2500) for a yr, then started out at 18.50 with a 2.50 shift diff to work nights. I then moved to my home town (Corinth, MS) and became a hospice nurse and made 18.50 plus my gas mileage (which averaged anywhere from 4-5 dollars more an hour). Now I work weekends in Memphis, TN - I am what you call a full-time/ part time weekender. We get 3 weekend off a yr (and then some) and plenty of cash plus, I pay 120 dollars a month for good insurance and get 401k, and I make 40 dollars an hour. I work two twelves a wk and some hospice during the week - and that job's salaries has increased by a dollar - very good deal!!! I enjoy the fact that I am not employed by an agency but still make excellent money! I've been an RN for 15 years. I have worked in ICU and ER settings in busy metropolitan hospitals. I worked for one employer for 14 years full time, while also working at other facilities part time. My best year I made $56,000. That may sound like a good income to some but consider that this is overall a very difficult, unappreciated and sometimes dangerous job. You have a heavy burden of responsibility and the lives of others are in your hands. One screw-up can ruin you for life. Imagine if you made an honest mistake, medicated a person (say a child or baby) with the wrong med or gave the wrong dose by accident. That patient dies. You get sued, reprimanded, dragged over the coals - while simultaneously experiencing the guilt and remorse for what you had done. You live with something like that for the rest of your life. Nurses are cussed, ridiculed and assaulted all while trying to save lives and make the world a better place. Hospitals are understaffed and nurses are given higher patient loads and more responsibility so that the hospital and doctors ($200k+/year) can profit more and more. Our benefits have been cut; our health insurance is some of the worse I have ever seen; and our retirement plan is an insult for a working professional. The average career span of a nurse is 7 years. The burnout rate is high and most every nurse I work with dreams of getting out of the profession - including myself. In Boston many nurses make at least 80k. I am a registered nurse (not a travel nurse) and I earned $78,000 last year in Florida with less than 2 years experience. But you have to consider the overtime and shift differentials. I averaged 60 hours per week. Any RN can reach as high as $100,000/year if they want to work overtime or have more than one job. As a registered nurse in the ICU and ER setting I have earned over and close to $100,000 a year for over 10 years. It seems to depend on where in the country you work, your specialty, and overtime. I cannot believe one of the ER ICU nurses who has 15 years experience only made $56,000 in his or her best year. I made more than that coming out of college with no overtime as a first-year nurse. You are truly in need of a raise especially if you work in a major metropolitan hospital. Without overtime I make $79,500 a year. Better go talk to your nursing director because you are getting majorly screwed. They earn enough to make a living The average salary of an RN is $50,000 a year depending on experience, education, and location. All depends on where you work. The majority of the jobs in the NHS are covered by the Agenda for Change (AFC) pay scales to determine basic salary levels. There are nine pay bands and each band has a number of pay points. Staff will usually move up to the next pay point each year until they reach the top limit of the pay band
Asked in Nursing, Lawyers

Does a lawyer or nurse make more?

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it really depends on the type of lawyer and nurse, but they make around the same salary
Asked in Nursing

How did Dr Jean Watson lose her eye?

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In a skiing accident.
Asked in Job Training and Career Qualifications, Nursing

What classes are required in college to be a RN?

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Pharmacology Introduction to the interactions and effects involved in drug categorization. This course offers a view into the nurse's role in administering medication within a medical facility. Anatomy & Physiology This course describes the functions of the human body, including chemistry, cell and tissue structures and the introduction of the body systems. Care of Children and Families Students will study theories associated with the proper nursing care for children and their families using accurate decisions and ethical principles within a medical facility. Foundations of Nursing This course introduces the role of a professional nurse. Topics include the history of professional nursing and situational issues concerning the care of patients. Management of Client Care Leadership and managerial skills will be learned through a series of applications, knowledge, training and skills within the nursing profession. Mental Health Nursing Concepts related to mental health and the appropriate treatment to patients and their families is the main focus of this nursing course happy to hellppp(: