Sound Waves

Sound waves are a mechanical oscillation of pressure. It is a series of vibrations that can be heard.

Asked by Ciara Parker in Sound Waves, Science

Is silence a sound?

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Well, not really. That's like saying bald is a hairstyle.
Asked in Physics, Space Travel and Exploration, Science Experiments, Sound Waves

What is the speed of ultrasound waves in the air?

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The 'normal' speed of sound is 340 m/s in dry air at room temperature and pressure. From your question, it appears we should differentiate the terms "ultrasonic" and "supersonic". Ultrasonic relates to sonic frequencies higher than 20 KHz, i.e. beyond audible range. For a given gas, the speed of sound is independent of the frequency of the sound measured and also independent of the density of the gas. Supersonic relates to a speed of an object greater than the normal speed of sound (340 m/s in air at STP) and usually the phenomena associated with it. The speed of sound is also a functionof the medium through which it's passing. For example, the speed of sound through water is 1,500 m/s, and is slightly over 5,000 m/s in iron. So to answer your question, the speed of ultrasound in airis340 m/s for the reasons given.
Asked in Science, Sound Waves

Do sound waves travel forever?

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No, they dissipate, broken up by other waves, or simply by growing to attenuated. They dissipate as the wavefront continues to travel farther way and the density of the energy will spread farther and farther away until it is essentially zero.
Asked in Science, Sound Waves

How can you prevent sounds from traveling?

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Sounds, once created, cannot be "prevented" from traveling. A "sound" becomes a sound only because it has already traveled, even if only for an instant. Because sounds are compression waves, they need a medium through which to travel. A sound will continue to travel until it as dispersed or been absorbed to the point that it can no longer be detected. In a vacuum, there's an absolute lack of material. In this condition, a sound cannot even be created, let alone travel. So if you wanted to prevent a sound from occurring, attempt to make a sound in a vacuum. There will be no sound at all through the vacuum. However, even in this situation, the material you used in attempts to create a sound will transmit a sound wave. If a sound as been generated and started travelling, it can be attenuated by absorption which limits or prevent the sound from being present although still very close to the "travelling sound". There are a variety of acoustic insulating materials that can be used for this absorption. Thick foam is used on conventional headphones to limit sound travel. The one thing that is more effective than absorption that can be used is an active sound generator that can detect and transmit the inverse sound waves. This results in the sound waves being cancelled. This method is used by the sound-cancelling headphones.
Asked in Solid State Physics, Sound Waves

How many decibels do you need to break glass?

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It is not so much the volume of the sound as the frequency as well. Sound at the wrong frequency can be played as loud as you like and it will not break the glass. The sound needs to be the same frequency as the resonant frequency of the glass (tap the glass, that note is it's resonant frequency). Once the resonant frequency has been found, it does not take much volume at all, even humans can do it, albeit trained singers (see Mythbusters).
Asked in Singing, Sound Waves

How high do you have to be to break glass?

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You don't necessarily have to go so high to break a glass, rather it is hitting the exact same frequency of vibration that the glass has. So you would tap the glass to determine the frequency (you need someone with perfect pitch or an analyzer), and then you just have to hit that same note at the right intensity to break the glass.
Asked in Sound Waves

How are sound waves created?

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sound waves are created by producing the vibrations in air
Asked in Science, Sound Waves

How is pitch related to frequency?

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The higher the frequency, the higher the pitch. The lower the frequency, the lower the pitch.
Asked in Waves Vibrations and Oscillations, Sound Waves

Will loud sounds from traffic near a school break glass objects inside the school explain?

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No. Loud sounds from near a school are unlikely to break the glass. They would have to be extremely loud.
Asked in Sound Waves

Example of pleasant sound?

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Different people think that different sounds are pleasant, but here are some sounds that are often perceived as pleasant: piano purring harp music the sound of rain the sound of waves crashing on the beach
Asked in Thunderstorms and Lightning, Sound Waves

Why do scientists not need to have perfect pitch in order to analyze sounds?

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Scientists do not need perfect pitch to analyse sounds because they use instruments to detect and assess the noise.
Asked in Waves Vibrations and Oscillations, Sound Waves

How do sound waves behave like the waves in spring toys?

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they are different by the way they behave and the way it is different is one behaves like they should and the other one behaves bad.
Asked in Science, Sound Waves

Is the loudness of a sound wave is related to its amplitude?

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The loudness of a sound wave all depends on its amplitude. The larger the amplitude, the louder the sounds, and vice versa. Take a look at the image below.
Asked in Sound Waves

What do sound waves strike when they reach the head of the microphone?

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if I'm right or wrong it might be the diaphragm of the microphone because when you sing into it it hits the small padding and into the wire coil, coming out as a electric current .But as i said before i might be wrong so please correct me if you wish.
Asked in Speed of Sound, Electromagnetic Radiation, Waves Vibrations and Oscillations, Sound Waves

What is the difference between heat waves and sound waves?

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Heat waves are a form of electromagnetic radiation. Therefore, they are transverse waves (oscillate perpendicularly to the direction of propagation) and need no medium to travel through. Sound waves, on the other hand, are mechanical waves, meaning they need a medium to travel through. If that medium is a liquid or a gas, sound waves oscillate longitudinally (in the direction they're traveling). If that medium is a solid, they oscillate both longitudinally and transversely.
Asked in Waves Vibrations and Oscillations, Sound Waves

How can a microphone and oscilloscope show a sound wave?

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The microphone reacts to changes in air pressure and creates corresponding AC electical waveforms. The oscilloscope takes the AC waveforms and deflects a moving electron beam in a cathode ray tube, thus producing a moving display of the electrical waveform.
Asked in Science, Sound Waves

Which equipment is most useful when measuring the two environmental changes mentioned?

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A thermometer and light meter are the most useful when measuring two environmental changes.
Asked in Sound Waves

Sound waves in the range above 20000 hertz?

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Such sounds are called Ultrasounds.
Asked in Science, Sound Waves

What is the difference between reverberation and echo?

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The gaps between the reflections are long when you hear an echo. When the reflections are very close together then you here no single echo, you hear many close reflections as a reverberation.
Asked in Waves Vibrations and Oscillations, Sound Waves

What is a buzzer?

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A buzzer is any mechanical, electromechanical, electronic, etc. device designed to produce a buzzing sound or vibration when activated. Some examples are: joy buzzer, a mechanical device used for practical jokes that is held in the palm and activated when the jokester shakes hands, causing an unpleasant vibration in the palm of the victim (shown in image above) electric buzzer, an electromechanical device that produces a buzzing noise and activated by connecting to electrical power piezo buzzer, an electronic device using the vibrations of a flat disk of piezoelectric material to produce a buzzing noise and activated by enabling it controlling electronic circuit
Asked in Sound Waves

What does lurched mean to do with waves?

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not normally connected with waves. A sudden tip or roll to one side is a suggestion, although is more applies to a ship or a staggering person. It is an act of swaying abruptly, perhaps waves do that.