Sugar and Sweeteners

Sugar is composed of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen. It is used as a natural food stuff to sweeten the majority of other food stuffs that we wish to taste sweet. Monosaccharides is the simplest form of sugar. Sugar can be found in the tissues of plants before sugar use, honey was used to add sweetness to our foods. Sweeteners, rather than being a food stuff is a food additive. High intensity sweeteners, are a lot sweeter than sugar that we use everyday that does not contain the same level of food energy. Sweeteners can be natural or synthetic the majority are artificial. Sorbitol is a natural sweetener whereas saccharin, created by accident in 1879 is an artificial sweetener. Sweeteners can take the place of natural sugar, where the consumption of natural sugar may be detrimental to our health, such as diabetes sufferers. Canada banned the use of saccharin in 1977 as tests in relation to bladder cancer from the 1960's showed that their may be a link to bladder cancer of users of high dies of saccharin, also these tests involved the use of animals.

Asked in Baking, Ingredient Substitutions, Sugar and Sweeteners

Can you substitute granulated sugar for cane sugar?

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One might be sweeter than the other, but yes, they can be switched. * granulated sugar can be cane sugar or beet sugar. Read the label.
Asked in Mental Health, Sugar and Sweeteners

Sugar chemical name?

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sucrose (C12H22O11 sucrose or glucose)
Asked in Pizza, Sugar and Sweeteners

How much sugar is in pizza?

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A average 14" pizza, cheese topping, original Crust has 4.1g of sugar.
Asked in Food & Cooking, Sugar and Sweeteners

How do you make glucose syrup?

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Simple. Take a cup of sugar and 1/2 cup of water and heat till just thickened. Not too long or it will become a solid. Actually, the above method will not result in glucose. Table sugar is "sucrose" (a mixture of fructose and glucose) and heating it with water does not change this; it remains a mixture of fructose and glucose. (It is not very practical to attempt making pure glucose in a home environment, however many supermarkets sell it in hydrated and powdered form for use in cooking).
Asked in Gluten, Sugar and Sweeteners

Is granulated cane sugar gluten free?

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Yes, and it's healthier for you too.
Asked in Sugar and Sweeteners, Splenda

How many carbs are in 1 cup splenda brown sugar?

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There are about 192 grams of carbohydrate in 1 cup of Splenda Brown Sugar. That's about the same as regular sugar, but you only use half as much of the Splenda Brown Sugar for the same amount of sweetening in your recipe.
Asked in Food & Cooking, Sugar and Sweeteners

Does sugar contain iodine?

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No, I believe you are thinking of the reaction between iodine and starches or you could be thinking of salt which is now often iodized to prevent clumping when exposed to water.
Asked in Sugar and Sweeteners

Does sugar have a smell?

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Yes, but it's hard to detect unless the sugar is heated. If you make caramel by browning the sugar you begin to smell the odor of the sugar.
Asked in Sugar and Sweeteners, Splenda

What is the boiling point of water AND splenda?

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it takes a longer time to boil than just water and sugar, because of the other chemicals added to splenda. The splenda reacts slower than the sugar.
Asked in Nutrition, Coca-Cola, Sugar and Sweeteners

How many grams of sugar in a coca-cola?

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One 600 ml bottle (≈20.29 U.S. fuild ounces) of Coca-Cola contains the approximate equivalent of 15 teaspoons of sugar. According to the nutrition facts, there are 34 grams of sugar per 12 oz can of Coca-Cola. There are 40 grams of sugar (almost 10 teaspoons) in a 12oz can of coke.
Asked in Sugar and Sweeteners

Is sugar inelastic?

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No, first of all it is not a necessity for life, second there are many substitutes for sugar therefore it is not inelastic.
Asked in Nutrition, Coca-Cola, Sugar and Sweeteners

How many grams of sugar are in a Coke?

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The answer, by law in the United States, has to be placed on the coke can itself. A 12 ounce can of Coca Cola contains 39 grams of sugar. This converts to 1.37568 ounces. This is roughly a bit more than two tablespoons.
Asked in Chewing Gum, Sugar and Sweeteners, Aspartame

What gum does not have aspartame in it?

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Very very little gum doesn't have aspartame in it. Mainly bubble gum has no aspartame but I found some aspartame in Hubba Bubba.
Asked in Sugar and Sweeteners

Why is my sugar damp?

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Sugar is what scientists call 'hygroscopic', meaning it attracts water from the air. If your sugar is prone to getting damp, it is best to keep it in an air-tight container. Some glass jars have an air-seal. These are ideal for storing sugar. Small quantities of sugar can be put into a suitable bowl (stainless steel, glass etc) for easy access, which can be stored in warm dry conditions when not needed for immediate use.
Asked in Nutrition, Sugar and Sweeteners

Why is lactose sweet?

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Lactose is a type of sugar.
Asked in Sugar and Sweeteners, Splenda

Is splenda better for your weight than sugar?

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It is better for your weight because it has lesser calories. But it has many side effects. There is sucralose in it, and it's really not good for your body once you've been absorbing it for a really long time. Here are the possible side effects: Self-reported adverse reactions to Splenda or sucralose collected by the Sucralose Toxicity Information Center include skin rashes/flushing, panic-like agitation, dizziness and numbness, diarrhea, swelling, muscle aches, headaches, intestinal cramping, bladder issues, and stomach pain.
Asked in Sugar and Sweeteners

How many carbohydrates are in one cup of sugar?

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There are 192 Carbohydrates in one cup of sugar.
Asked in Nutrition, Idioms, Cliches, and Slang, Sugar and Sweeteners

What is sugar rush?

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Or, we can now look at the facts behind said "Sugar Rush". A sugar rush, or sugar high, is supposedly marked by the consumption of too much sweet foods. There is no scientific explanation as to how sugar could, in any way possible, cause any sort of energy to an individual. Glucose... well, I'll copy and paste some Glucose information: "Glucose (a type of simple carbohydrate/sugar) is necessary for the body to function properly. In fact, several parts of your body (e.g., red blood cells and parts of the brain) can function ONLY using glucose as an energy source. In addition, glucose is chemically a part of sucrose (table sugar)...and is released when sucrose is digested (broken apart) in the human digestive tract. Glucose can be directly absorbed into the blood and reaches the internal organs quite quickly. So, if your body wasn't maintaining some minimum level of blood glucose, it is, in theory, conceivable that eating sugar-containing foods might produce a 'sugar high'...a feeling of increased energy." Obviously, this is not the case with any of the Americans proclaiming that they are/have experienced a sugar rush. That's just a small idea of what some may conceive as a sugar rush for people with sugar problems. A child that is often absorbing large quantities of sugar is not going to suffer any sort of deficiency from sugar. Bottom line, sugar rushes are a myth that is yet to be confirmed. It's what many would know better as The Placebo Effect. By eating something one believes is plentiful in sugar content, and at the same time subconsciously believing that sugar causes energy, one would (and clearly do), feel as though they have more energy. It's how placebo works. I will avoid going into it's legitimacy, though, as this is simply an explanation of what a sugar rush is. It's realism is not to be debated here. well the above is true and everything, but i have had sugar rush, it is like being drunk, but when your drunk or high u have hallucinations and whatever. you can do some pretty dangerous and risky stuff. when you have sugar rush, its like being happy drunk. you know, when your kind of loopy and silly. its just a lot of extra energy. a lot of fun most of the time. unfortunately like when you are drunk, you have a hangover. after the sugar is all worn out, you get headaches, stomachaches and you feel really tried. don;t get sugar rush too often, that much sugar is unhealthy. try to keep sugar rushes to childish parties and Halloween.
Asked in Sugar and Sweeteners

What is a triose sugar?

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a sugar with three carbons
Asked in Nutrition, Citrus Fruit, Sugar and Sweeteners

How many grams of sugar are in a lemon?

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Like any fruit, lemons contain sugar. A typical lemon contains around 2g of sugar per fruit.
Asked in Multiple Sclerosis, Sugar and Sweeteners, Aspartame

Does aspartame cause multiple sclerosis?

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No other consumable substance on the face of the earth has been studied more than aspartame. Over 30 years and over 200 scientific studies (the REAL kind, with words like "double-blind," "placebo-controlled," and "randomized" in their titles) have proven, re-proven, and reaffirmed, that aspartame is safe. Researchers have spent a great deal of time reviewing every claim by people who believe that aspartame causes everything from MS (which, by the way, no one knows the cause, and has been documented for over 200 years, LONG before aspartame was even invented) to migraines and bulging eyes. Not a single claim of any cause has panned out under true scientific scrutiny. If you do have "proof" that aspartame causes any sort of disorder, look through your proof and see if there are any scientific studies that were done. Scientific studies use the big words above -- randomized, placebo-controlled, and double-blind. Those tenets of a true scientific study ensure that there is no bias in the group and that the substance is tested against a "placebo," or a control substance. In essence, if there is no appreciable difference between the group which took the tested substance and the group which took a placebo, you can say that the substance did not appreciably contribute to those people developing the symptom in question. Now, to more of the scientific detail. Aspartame is a compound made of two ingredients: aspartic acid, and phenylalanine. When aspartame is consumed, it is broken down in the body into three components: aspartic acid, phenylalanine, and methanol. These three substances are then absorbed by the body and used in natural body processes, the same way your body uses those three substances when they are derived from food. None of the components of aspartame, nor aspartame itself, builds up in the body. The amounts of the three substances derived from aspartame are far smaller than you would get from food as well. For example, if you were to have a glass of tomato juice, you'd get about six times the methanol than you'd get from an aspartame-sweetened drink of roughly the same size. A glass of skim milk would give you six times the phenylalanine and thirteen times the aspartic acid you'd get from an equivalent aspartame-sweetened drink. In short, hundreds of scientific studies over the past three decades have all resulted in the same outcome, and the same conclusion: aspartame is safe.
Asked in Sugar and Sweeteners

How many tablespoons is 11 grams of sugar?

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Your 11 grams of granulated sugar is just a bit under 1 tablespoon. There is just a hint over 12 grams of granulated sugar in 1 tablespoon of the stuff.