Writing: Characters and Dialogue

Characters are one of the most important elements in a story, and dialogue is an effective way of conveying character. This category is for questions relating to characterization and the creation of dialogue.

2,313 Questions
Creative Writing
Writing: Characters and Dialogue

Why is it impossible to describe a British person?

All things can be described. Click the link to see how.

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Creative Writing
Writing: Characters and Dialogue

What are some good model names?

You need to invent your own names - writers who copy ideas from other people end up in trouble for plagiarism! If you copy someone's names or ideas, then when you publish your story, they could claim you stole those from them and sue you for part of your money.

I use online name generators for the names of my secondary characters - the main characters, I take my time and choose special names from baby name books!

Click on the LINKS for character name generator websites!

121122123
Writing: Characters and Dialogue

What are some good names for girl spies?

You need to invent your own names - writers who copy ideas from other people end up in trouble for plagiarism! If you copy someone's names or ideas, then when you publish your story, they could claim you stole those from them and sue you for part of your money.

I use online name generators for the names of my secondary characters - the main characters, I take my time and choose special names from baby name books!

Click on the LINKS for character name generator websites!

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Writing: Characters and Dialogue
Ramadan

How can write a dialog between two friends about Ramadan?

Writing dialogue is not as hard as you're letting it seem. You have dialogue all the time -- it's called talking. If you honestly cannot think of what your characters are going to say to one another, you need to go take a break and go somewhere out in public. Sit somewhere in the middle of a crowd for one to two hours and just listen to people talking. Then, go home and write down some of the things you heard people saying. That's dialogue.

What do you know about Ramadan? Perhaps you need to do some research and find out some facts so your characters can have realistic conversations.

When you need to have your characters talk, just pretend it's you and a friend (or several friends), and have them say something you'd probably say in the same situation. Then imagine what your friends would say in reply, and go back and forth that way. As you become a better writer, your characters themselves will "tell" you what they want to say, because they become like real people to you.

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Writing: Characters and Dialogue
Ancient Greek Art

What was the dialogues of Andromache?

She ceased: then godlike Hector answer'd kind, (His various plumage sporting in the wind): That post, and all the rest, shall be my care; But shall I then forsake the unfinish'd war? How would the Trojans brand great Hector's name, And one base action sully all my fame, Acquired by wounds and battles bravely fought! Oh! how my soul abhors so mean a thought! Long have I learn'd to slight this fleeting breath, And view with cheerful eyes approaching death. The inexorable Sisters have decreed That Priam's house and Priam's self shall bleed: The day shall come, in which proud Troy shall yield, And spread its smoking ruins o'er the field; Yet Hecuba's, nor Priam's hoary age, Whose blood shall quench some Grecian's thirsty rage, Nor my brave brothers that have bit the ground, Their souls dismiss'd through many a ghastly wound, Can in my bosom half that grief create, As the sad thought of your impending fate; When some proud Grecian dame shall tasks impose, Mimic your tears, and ridicule your woes: Beneath Hyperia's waters shall you sweat, And, fainting, scarce support the liquid weight: Then shall some Argive loud insulting cry, Behold the wife of Hector, guard of Troy! Tears, at my name, shall drown those beauteous eyes, And that fair bosom heave with rising sighs: Before that day, by some brave hero's hand, May I lie slain, and spurn the bloody sand!

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Writing: Characters and Dialogue

How do you write a dialog between candidate and employer?

Writing dialogue is not as hard as you're letting it seem. You have dialogue all the time -- it's called talking. If you honestly cannot think of what your characters are going to say to one another, you need to go take a break and go somewhere out in public. Sit somewhere in the middle of a crowd for one to two hours and just listen to people talking. Then, go home and write down some of the things you heard people saying. That's dialogue.

When you need to have your characters talk, just pretend it's you and a friend (or several friends), and have them say something you'd probably say in the same situation. Then imagine what your friends would say in reply, and go back and forth that way. As you become a better writer, your characters themselves will "tell" you what they want to say, because they become like real people to you.

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Fiction Writing
Writing: Characters and Dialogue

What are some dark girl names for my story?

You need to invent your own names - writers who copy ideas from other people end up in trouble for plagiarism! If you copy someone's names or ideas, then when you publish your story, they could claim you stole those from them and sue you for part of your money. Click on the LINKS for ideas on naming your characters.

ok well here are a few,

-scarlet

-dusk

-shadow

all i got sorry (scarlet is my fave!!)

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Writing: Characters and Dialogue
Grammar
Literary Terminology
Short Stories

What is an acrostic for dialog?

An acrostic poem is one written so that the first letters of each line spell a specific word, one that usually has something to do with the theme of the poem. Typically, the spelled word guides the poem. An acrostic poem for the word "dialog" would begin like this, and then the poet would fill in the rest of the lines:

D

I

A

L

O

G

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Writing: Characters and Dialogue
Personal Writing

How can you write a dialog between a customer and a tailor?

Writing dialogue is not as hard as you're letting it seem. You have dialogue all the time -- it's called talking. If you honestly cannot think of what your characters are going to say to one another, you need to go take a break and go somewhere out in public. Sit somewhere in the middle of a crowd for one to two hours and just listen to people talking. Then, go home and write down some of the things you heard people saying. That's dialogue.

When you need to have your characters talk, just pretend it's you and a friend (or several friends), and have them say something you'd probably say in the same situation. Then imagine what your friends would say in reply, and go back and forth that way. As you become a better writer, your characters themselves will "tell" you what they want to say, because they become like real people to you.

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Writing: Characters and Dialogue
Science Fiction

What is the name of the main character in '1984'?

Winston Smith is the main character in George Orwell's novel 1984.

107108109
Shopping
Public Speaking
Writing: Characters and Dialogue

How do you write a dialog between two friends?

Surely you have at least one friend -- even on online one! Surely the two of you talk!

Writing dialogue is not as hard as you're letting it seem. You have dialogue all the time -- it's called talking. If you honestly cannot think of what your characters are going to say to one another, you need to go take a break and go somewhere out in public. Sit somewhere in the middle of a crowd for one to two hours and just listen to people talking. Then, go home and write down some of the things you heard people saying. That's dialogue.

When you need to have your characters talk, just pretend it's you and a friend (or several friends), and have them say something you'd probably say in the same situation. Then imagine what your friends would say in reply, and go back and forth that way. As you become a better writer, your characters themselves will "tell" you what they want to say, because they become like real people to you.

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Baby Names
Writing: Characters and Dialogue

What is a last name for Julia because im writing a story and I need a name soon?

You need to learn how to invent names if you're going to be a writer! Here's a related question to teach you how to do it.

Julia is a common name so to make your character more interesting, try to put an unusual name as her last name.

You could mix a couple of words together

heres a list of names that you could mix or keep it normal

henthway

jenson

keily

talty

Taylor

truley

fleet

deson

Anderson

wharner

Balsom

To think of interesting new names here are some tips:

take a word and mumble it about 30 times really fast

the word may sound weird and distorted but that's the point

to make the word normal, add in a few letters and BOOM - you've got your new name!!

EXAMPLE:

say the word fast 30 times : Saxaphone x30

Ending word: sasnpone

Add and take away a few letters: Sasonae

Pronounced: sas-o-nay

Background: You could say that this word could have originated from Spain and your character (Julia)'s grandfather was spanish... and before you know it - there you got a story!!!

... Happy writing!

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Writing: Characters and Dialogue
Short Stories

What is a summary of Trurl's Machine?

Trurl's machine is a story about two inventors that make a very dumb robot that trys to kill them

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India Language and Culture
Writing: Characters and Dialogue

How do you write a dialogue between a colonial forester and an adivasi discussing the issue of hunting in the forest?

Writing dialogue is not as hard as you're letting it seem. You have dialogue all the time -- it's called talking. If you honestly cannot think of what your characters are going to say to one another, you need to go take a break and go somewhere out in public. Sit somewhere in the middle of a crowd for one to two hours and just listen to people talking. Then, go home and write down some of the things you heard people saying. That's dialogue.

When you need to have your characters talk, just pretend it's you and a friend (or several friends), and have them say something you'd probably say in the same situation. Then imagine what your friends would say in reply, and go back and forth that way. As you become a better writer, your characters themselves will "tell" you what they want to say, because they become like real people to you.

959697
Creative Writing
Writing: Characters and Dialogue

What are good names for Bee characters?

You need to invent your own names - writers who copy ideas from other people end up in trouble for plagiarism! If you copy someone's names or ideas, then when you publish your story, they could claim you stole those from them and sue you for part of your money.

I use online name generators for the names of my secondary characters - the main characters, I take my time and choose special names from baby name books!

Click on the LINKS for character name generator websites!

99100101
Creative Writing
Writing: Characters and Dialogue

How do you write good dialog for your novel or story?

Dialogue means writing down the way that people speak and communicate. Dialogue does several things in writing:

  • it gives the reader information
  • it adds depth to the characters
  • it makes the story more interesting

Dialogue can be tricky to write well. The best way to learn how to create believable dialogue is to be observant - listen to conversations, pay attention to how people speak, and jot down interesting remarks you overhear. Notice body language and facial expressions, too. Writers are always eavesdropping to get dialogue ideas!

My whole life, I've been a great eavesdropper! - George V. Higgins

When writing dialogue, stay away from all those synonyms for "said" - the idea is to keep the reader inside the story, and reading a lot of "he spat," "she expostulated," or "intoned the old man" just jars the reader right out and makes them aware of the mechanics behind the story instead. Also, resist the temptation to add adverbs - "he said bitingly," "she sobbed heartbrokenly," - show any emotion in the way the characters speak, not in adverbs. And just use the word "said." It's short, everyone knows what it means, and the reader can skim right over it without breaking concentration. Look at these two examples and see which one seems smoother to you:

"Well, Bob," the scientist sneered bitingly," as you know, the experiment was a success, thus rendering you completely invisible, as you requested."

"But," Bob whined in an annoying voice, "I've read all about this sort of thing. You did something wrong!" "

Nonsense," the scientist scoffed. "What am I going to do now?"

Bob queried worriedly. "You didn't tell me even I wouldn't be able to see myself!"

OR

"I don't see the need for panic, Bob," the scientist raised one eyebrow, but never looked up from his computer screen. He continued to rappidly enter data into the report. "I did explain the invisibility experiment to you quite thorougly. I'm certain we discussed this ... little problem. You didn't seem very concerned before we started, though I did mention that you might have difficulty."

"You don't understand!" Bob's footsteps tapped from one end of the lab to the other as he paced. "This never happened in any of the books I read! None of the superheroes ever had this problem!"

"I hardly think that comic books are a sound basis for scientific experimentation, Bob. You're going to have to come to grips with it, that's all."

"But what am I going to do? I was only supposed to be invisible to other people! You didn't tell me I would't be able to see myself either!"

Notice, also, that in the second example, I did not need to write "Bob said" or "the scientist said" every single time. If you note the actions of the speaker, then the "he said" is implied, and the reader can figure out who said what. Also, if the speaker calls the other character by name, it's obvious who is speaking, so you don't have to note it. You do need to note the speaker periodically - about every third line or so - in order to make certain the reader doesn't get confused. But you do not have to do it each time. In normal, back-and-forth conversation, the reader will be able to follow along most of the time without any problem.

Real conversation doesn't translate into believable dialogue. Listen to people talk, but shortcut what they've said when you write by cutting out 85 percent of the words they use. - Cynthia Riggs

Follow the rules you learned for grammar, though. Double quotation marks for dialogue, with single quotes for anything the speaker is quoting another speaker within his/her speech.

"You'll never believe it," Rachel whispered, "but Stan actually said 'Stick it' to his horrible boss the other day!"

Notice that the comma or other punctuation goes inside the quotation marks, not outside. You can add other descriptions besides the dialogue into your chapters. In fact, showing some action is a good way to indicate the character's emotion and personality.

Each character needs to have an individual way of speaking, too. This is where your observations come in handy. Does your character use big words and speak in educated sentences, or does he grunt out broken fragments using short words? A Harvard graduate will speak and gesture quite differently from a high-school dropout who drives a taxicab. Watch out for stereotypes, however - some taxicab drivers are PhD students or closet intellectuals!

Writing Dialogue with More Than Two Speakers

Many scenes in your story will involve more than just two people talking. There's no problem adding more speakers - just be sure that you are very clear about who is talking on each line. You'll probably want to sprinkle a few more "Bill said," and "Alice said," indicators into the section so that the reader doesn't get lost, but otherwise, it's exactly the same as writing a conversation between two characters.


Here's how to make a good character dialogue:
  1. Have a good idea already in your mind what the characters are going to talk about, and what they're going to say in general. Until you become a more experienced writer, you won't be able to "turn the characters loose" because you won't really "know" them as if they're real people. Experienced writers just have a part in their outline that says "Character X and Character Y talk about the problem" and they know the characters well enough to be able to just start writing it.
  2. Stay away from the fancy words -- avoid the temptation to use things like "she exclaimed," "he ejaculated," "the red-headed giant hissed," or anything besides "he said" or "she said!" The reader basically ignores the word "said," and your dialogue will flow along just fine if you stick to using that. When the reader comes up against some flowery term, it jerks them out of the flow and interrupts the story inside their head.
  3. Make it plain who's talking. You don't even have to use "he said" or "she said" every time! People will go back and forth, with one paragraph being one character, and the next the other character. So long as you put in some description that makes it plain who's talking, the reader can keep up without you having to put in "he said" after each line.
  4. Give each character their own way of speaking. People talk differently -- some use big words, some use small ones. Some use dialect and slang and some don't. Let the character's dialogue be part of your description of that character and show the readers what sort of person they are.

Here's a good example to show you what I mean -- you'll notice that I've done everything I suggested above (except plan it out in advance, because I'm using two characters that I "know" very well inside my head!)

Jess closed the door and slouched against the wall. "That man is going to drive me crazy!"

Kye sprawled onto the sofa. "I dunno. Kirkham's not that bad. He's just a little ...."

"Obsessed. That's what he is. I'm going to murder him."

"No, you ain't. What you're gonna do is ignore him. Let him run around like a squirrel in a trap worrying about how the job's gonna work out. You and me will stay calm and get it done."

Jess ran a hand through his hair. "Can I at least rough him up a little?"

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Movies
Writing: Characters and Dialogue

Which character in a movie is the audience meant to identify with?

The protagonist

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Names and Name Meanings
Writing: Characters and Dialogue

What are some posh last names for a book?

You must invent your own character names if you're going to be a writer. Click on the link to see how.

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Writing: Characters and Dialogue
Drama and Acting

What are the basic features of drama and their meaning?

Features of drama

1. Characterization

2. Chronology and time

3. Dialog

4. Role

5. Stage Direction

6. Title

7. Acts

8. Production

99100101
Writing: Characters and Dialogue

Is there any dialog about terrorism between two friends in net?

You should spend less time trying to copy someone else's work and just get your own homework done.

Writing dialogue is not as hard as you're letting it seem. You have dialogue all the time -- it's called talking. If you honestly cannot think of what your characters are going to say to one another, you need to go take a break and go somewhere out in public. Sit somewhere in the middle of a crowd for one to two hours and just listen to people talking. Then, go home and write down some of the things you heard people saying. That's dialogue.

When you need to have your characters talk, just pretend it's you and a friend (or several friends), and have them say something you'd probably say in the same situation. Then imagine what your friends would say in reply, and go back and forth that way. As you become a better writer, your characters themselves will "tell" you what they want to say, because they become like real people to you.

878889
Public Speaking
Writing: Characters and Dialogue

How do you write a dialog between two students discussing terrorism?

You could write a simple conversation between two students in New York on September 11 and their reactions to the day's events.

Writing dialogue is not as hard as you're letting it seem. You have dialogue all the time -- it's called talking. If you honestly cannot think of what your characters are going to say to one another, you need to go take a break and go somewhere out in public. Sit somewhere in the middle of a crowd for one to two hours and just listen to people talking. Then, go home and write down some of the things you heard people saying. That's dialogue.

When you need to have your characters talk, just pretend it's you and a friend (or several friends), and have them say something you'd probably say in the same situation. Then imagine what your friends would say in reply, and go back and forth that way. As you become a better writer, your characters themselves will "tell" you what they want to say, because they become like real people to you.

899091
Writing: Characters and Dialogue

How do you write a dialogue between two friends on the subject 'are watches necessary'?

Writing dialogue is not as hard as you're letting it seem. You have dialogue all the time -- it's called talking. If you honestly cannot think of what your characters are going to say to one another, you need to go take a break and go somewhere out in public. Sit somewhere in the middle of a crowd for one to two hours and just listen to people talking. Then, go home and write down some of the things you heard people saying. That's dialogue.

When you need to have your characters talk, just pretend it's you and a friend (or several friends), and have them say something you'd probably say in the same situation. Have them talk about whether watches are really necessary. Then imagine what your friends would say in reply, and go back and forth that way. As you become a better writer, your characters themselves will "tell" you what they want to say, because they become like real people to you.

878889
Writing: Characters and Dialogue
Books and Literature

What are the names of the spliced characters?

The main Characters are Peri (Cat-squid) and Entree (Cow-chicken). There is also Two-legs Joe (Rhino-bird), Patricia (Platypus), Copyhorse (Computer-horse) and Mr. Smarty Smarts (Dolphin-ape).

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Writing: Characters and Dialogue
Diamante
Ballad
Epic Poetry

What is the features of poetry?

..poems have meaning,images,patterns,sounds and lines..

535455
Writing: Characters and Dialogue
Books and Literature

How many pages does peeled by joan Bauer have?

There are 247 pages.
it has 248 pages

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