How many US women fought in World War 2?

Women were forbidden to be in combat, but that doesn't mean they didn't serve. Thanks to the efforts of a congresswoman from Massachusetts (Edith Nourse Rogers) and a Texas businesswoman and lawyer (Oveta Culp Hobby), women were able to enter the military for the first time during WW2. They served as WACs (Women's Army Corps), WAVES (Women's Naval Auxiliary), etc. Their roles were largely clerical, although some were also ham radio operators or involved with supply functions; but there were also some women aviators who actually flew supply runs and put their lives in great danger. The best known of these was Jacqueline Cochran. So, regarding how many women "fought", probably not that many. How many served? A sizable number, as all of the news magazines of the early 1940s noted with pride.
Women were forbidden to be in combat, but that doesn't mean they didn't serve. Thanks to the efforts of a congresswoman from Massachusetts (Edith Nourse Rogers) and a Texas businesswoman and lawyer (Oveta Culp Hobby), women were able to enter the military for the first time during WW2. They served as WACs (Women's Army Corps), WAVES (Women's Naval Auxiliary), etc. Their roles were largely clerical, although some were also ham radio operators or involved with supply functions; but there were also some women aviators who actually flew supply runs and put their lives in great danger. The best known of these was Jacqueline Cochran. So, regarding how many women "fought", probably not that many. How many served? A sizable number, as all of the news magazines of the early 1940s noted with pride.