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Chevy Silverado
Air Filters and Intake Manifolds
Chevy 350

When looking at a v6 3100 engine how do you tell what is the intake and what is the exhaust?

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2005-09-07 19:09:09
2005-09-07 19:09:09

The intake portion of the 3100 starts where the throttle body (where the accelerator cable attaches) attaches to the plenum (upper intake), below the plenum is the lower intake. The exhaust manifolds are between where the Exhaust pipe connects to and attaches to the cylinder head. The first answer is great, but here's some more as I have just finished replacing the intake manifolds on my 1997 Pontiac GrandAm with the 3.1L engine. First of all, this is a two-piece manifold which is unusual, the first one I've see like this.... This engine is a 60 degree V configuration, and the lower intake manifold bolts directly onto both heads, essentially filling in the center of the "V", and providing air/fuel to the head intake ports. Its mostly obscured by the upper intake manifold that bolts directly to the lower portion. The upper and lower intake manifolds are cast aluminium. The exhaust manifolds are each on the outside of the "V", and bolt directly to the heads. They are cast iron (usually rusty iron color), and are covered by silver sheet-metal heat shields. There is a crossover pipe that connects them to a collector which connects to the rest of the exhaust system.

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The intake manifold distributes the air fuel mixture from the carburetor to the cylinders. The exhaust manifold collects the exhaust gases from the cylinders and directs them out the exhaust pipe.

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if the car is a 95 and up, it under the exhaust crossover pipe

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the intake pushrods are shorter of the 2, all intake valves you can see with the intake off those pushrods go there, the rest are exhaust pushrods install in remaining holes

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Not sure which engine you are working on. It should be a 3100?? Intake valves use the short ones, exhaust the long ones. It's been a while since I've done mine so I don't have the exact order memorized. The valve closest to the intake port will be your intake. Fairly easy to determine which is which.

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The firing order for a 3100 Chevy engine is 1-2-3-4-5-6. The number one cylinder is on the right side of the engine, looking at it from the front.

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The intake and exhaust pushrods are different lengths. If you mix them up you can cause bent valves upon the first crank which would cause a no compression condition.

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A vacuum leak can cause the engine to idle high, but worse than that it can cause one or more cylinders to run lean. That can result in exhaust valves and pistons running at a higher than acceptable temperature and cause premature engine failure.

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yes it is, 3100 is in cc and the 3.1 is in letres

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I don't remember the exact order....it's been a while since I did it. But the short ones are for the intake valve and the long ones for the exhaust.

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You would need to call a parts house and they can answer that for you.

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If u have the 3100 engine you have to remove the air intake box and bellow for AIT sensor look down you'll see the low side connection for charging th A/C. i have a 3100 but its not along the firewall towards the middle?

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Yes it can but the intake is probably the bad guy. General Motors had alot of problems with them.

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I just had my intake gasket changed on my 99 Monte Carlo for the same thing. My cousin is a mechanic and has changed the same gasket on several cars with the 3.1 engine. The gasket is about $60 - $75 plus labor.

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O2 sensors are always located on the exhaust system.O2 sensors are always located on the exhaust system.

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Check your Fuel Pressure Regulator under the intake plenum that is on the fuel rail. Had the same issue myself, gas coming from the intake.

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yes.. i have a 99 grand am gt come stock 3400 and i put a 3100 in it.. runs perfect..

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The thermostat is at the left (driver) side of the engine under the air intake tube. To replace, drain the coolant, take off the engine air intake tube connected to the intake manifold on top of the engine and take off the air cleaner housing at the left side of the engine. Then take off the large coolant hose going to the engine on the left side. The thermostat is inside the cast aluminum flanged nipple housing that the large coolant tube is connected to. The bottom of the two bolts that connect the housing looks impossible to get at, but you can access 1/12 of a turn at a time with a standard open end wrench from under the exhaust. You do not need to remove the exhaust manifold, but getting behind and under it is tight. You do not need to completely remove both bolts that hold the flange on because the flange has an open slot. If you take out the bottom bolt, getting it started would be hard because it is quite hidden.

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217030% off of 3100= 30% less applied to 3100= 3100 - (30% * 3100)= 3100 - (0.30 * 3100)= 3100 - 930= 2170

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it take 4.2 liters of oil

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Look where the thermostat is attached to the intake manifold


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