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Medical Schools

Medical schools offer varying advanced degrees in medicine. Highly competitive, medical schools require scores from standardized tests such as the MCAT prior to entrance. Typical doctors attend medical school for four years after a bachelor's degree and then go on to complete an internship and residency before they can practice.

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What are the paramedical courses in kerala?

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Diploma in Medical Laboratory Technology (DMLT) Course (b) Diploma in Radiological Technology (DRT) course (c) Diploma in Ophthalmic Assistance (DOA) Course (d) Dental Mechanic Certificate (DMC) Course (e) Dental Hygienist Certificate (DHC) Course (f) Diploma in Operation Theater Technology (DOTT) Course (g) Diploma in Cardio Vascular Technician (DCVT) Course these are the courses according to Kerala Paramedical Council propectus ,for further details visit http://www.keralaparamedicalcouncil.org

How many years does it take to become a medical assistant?

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The associates degree is designed as a two year program of study as a full-time student provided the student takes the degree as prescribed by the college, and provided the student does not require prerequisite coursework as a result of basic skills testing. There are some programs of study that may take a bit longer depending on the number of credits required. Usually these are programs within the health related fields. In addition, for students who require developmental course work as a result of basic skills testing, it would take longer. How much longer would depend on the extent of the developmental courses they are required to take. Evidently, those individuals who attend college on a part-time based would also extend their time in school. How much longer would depend on the credit load carried each semester. Typically, an associates degree takes between 60 and 64 credits to complete depending on the specific school, program of study, and state mandates.

Can you get into medical school with these gcse qualifications?

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It depends on the university you want to apply for, considering that medicine is a competitive career you most probably need a minimum of 5*. However some universities are nicer and if you do extremely well in a levels then they won't mind so much about GCSE's. the most important GCSE's you have to concentrate on are biology, chemistry, maths. It would be best to get a* in them, it takes the pressure off at a level.

What are the high school requirements to be a doctor?

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The answer will always be: As good as you need to get to the next level of education.

The first question you need to ask yourself is: What kind of grades will I need in HS to get to College/University?

For example, if you need a 87% average to get into a Heath Sciences program at University, this is the "kind of grades" you need in high school to become a doctor.

From College or University, depending on the Med school you apply, you will need a combination of things including grades, which may be averaged over 1, 2, 3 or 4 years. You might have to do a MCAT, letter of intent, volunteer work, experience in the field, interviews etc.

Medical schools won't look at your grades in HS.

How much is tuition at Mount Sinai medical school?

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According to the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), the average educational debt of indebted graduates of the class of 2009 was $156,456.

Another answer:

The average tuition and fees at public medical schools was $14,557 per year.

At private medical schools tuition and fees reached an average of $30,960.

Do you have to go to medical school to get a Ph.D in psychology?

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A psychologist is not a physician and therefore cannot prescribe medication. A psychiatrist is a physician with a specialty in psychiatry and can prescribe drugs and medication.

A psychologist is not a physician and therefore cannot prescribe medication. A psychiatrist is a physician with a specialty in psychiatry and can prescribe drugs and medication.

A psychologist is not a physician and therefore cannot prescribe medication. A psychiatrist is a physician with a specialty in psychiatry and can prescribe drugs and medication.

A psychologist is not a physician and therefore cannot prescribe medication. A psychiatrist is a physician with a specialty in psychiatry and can prescribe drugs and medication.

A psychologist is not a physician and therefore cannot prescribe medication. A psychiatrist is a physician with a specialty in psychiatry and can prescribe drugs and medication.

A psychologist is not a physician and therefore cannot prescribe medication. A psychiatrist is a physician with a specialty in psychiatry and can prescribe drugs and medication.

Do veterinarians have to go to school longer than medical doctors?

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Prospective veterinarians must graduate with a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (D.V.M. or V.M.D.) degree from a 4-year program at an accredited college of veterinary medicine and must obtain a license to practice. There are 28 colleges in 26 States that meet accreditation standards set by the Council on Education of the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA). The prerequisites for admission vary. Many of these colleges do not require a bachelor's degree for entrance, but all require a significant number of credit hours-ranging from 45 to 90 semester hours-at the undergraduate level. However, most of the students admitted have completed an undergraduate program. Applicants without a bachelor's degree face a difficult task gaining admittance.

Preveterinary courses emphasize the sciences. Veterinary medical colleges typically require classes in organic and inorganic chemistry, physics, biochemistry, general biology, animal biology, animal nutrition, genetics, vertebrate embryology, cellular biology, microbiology, zoology, and systemic physiology. Some programs require calculus; some require only statistics, college algebra and trigonometry, or precalculus. Most veterinary medical colleges also require core courses, including some in English or literature, the social sciences, and the humanities. Increasingly, courses in practice management and career development are becoming a standard part of the curriculum, to provide a foundation of general business knowledge for new graduates.

In addition to satisfying preveterinary course requirements, applicants must submit test scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), the Veterinary College Admission Test (VCAT), or the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), depending on the preference of the college to which they are applying. Currently, 22 schools require the GRE, 4 require the VCAT, and 2 accept the MCAT.

In admittance decisions, some veterinary medical colleges place heavy consideration on a candidate's veterinary and animal experience. Formal experience, such as work with veterinarians or scientists in clinics, agribusiness, research, or some area of health science, is particularly advantageous. Less formal experience, such as working with animals on a farm or ranch or at a stable or animal shelter, also is helpful. Students must demonstrate ambition and an eagerness to work with animals.

There is keen competition for admission to veterinary school. The number of accredited veterinary colleges has remained largely the same since 1983, whereas the number of applicants has risen significantly. Only about 1 in 3 applicants was accepted in 2004. AVMA-recognized veterinary specialties-such as pathology, internal medicine, dentistry, nutrition, ophthalmology, surgery, radiology, preventive medicine, and laboratory animal medicine-are usually in the form of a 2-year internship. Interns receive a small salary but usually find that their internship experience leads to a higher beginning salary, relative to those of other starting veterinarians. Veterinarians who seek board certification in a specialty also must complete a 3- to 4-year residency program that provides intensive training in specialties such as internal medicine, oncology, radiology, surgery, dermatology, anesthesiology, neurology, cardiology, ophthalmology, and exotic small-animal medicine.

All States and the District of Columbia require that veterinarians be licensed before they can practice. The only exemptions are for veterinarians working for some Federal agencies and some State governments. Licensing is controlled by the States and is not strictly uniform, although all States require the successful completion of the D.V.M. degree-or equivalent education-and a passing grade on a national board examination. The Educational Commission for Foreign Veterinary Graduates (ECFVG) grants certification to individuals trained outside the United States who demonstrate that they meet specified requirements for the English language and for clinical proficiency. ECFVG certification fulfills the educational requirement for licensure in all States. Applicants for licensure satisfy the examination requirement by passing the North American Veterinary Licensing Exam (NAVLE),an 8-hour computer-based examination consisting of 360 multiple-choice questions covering all aspects of veterinary medicine. Administered by the National Board of Veterinary Medical Examiners (NBVME),the NAVLE includes visual materials designed to test diagnostic skills and constituting 10 percent of the total examination.

The majority of States also require candidates to pass a State jurisprudence examination covering State laws and regulations. Some States do additional testing on clinical competency as well. There are few reciprocal agreements between States, making it difficult for a veterinarian to practice in a different State without first taking that State's examination.

Nearly all States have continuing education requirements for licensed veterinarians. Requirements differ by State and may involve attending a class or otherwise demonstrating knowledge of recent medical and veterinary advances.

Most veterinarians begin as employees in established practices. Despite the substantial financial investment in equipment, office space, and staff, many veterinarians with experience set up their own practice or purchase an established one.

Newly trained veterinarians can become U.S. Government meat and poultry inspectors, disease-control workers, animal welfare and safety workers, epidemiologists, research assistants, or commissioned officers in the U.S. Public Health Service or various branches of the U.S. Armed Forces. A State license may be required.

Prospective veterinarians must have good manual dexterity. They should have an affinity for animals and the ability to get along with their owners, especially pet owners, who tend to form a strong bond with their pet. Veterinarians who intend to go into private practice should possess excellent communication and business skills, because they will need to manage their practice and employees successfully and promote, market, and sell their services.

Source: http://www.collegegrad.com/careers/proft88.shtml#tra

Which subjects do you need to study at school to become a doctor?

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Asked by Wiki User

You need at least 5 subjects to be passed at a very high level, the main ones are:

Chemistry (compulsory)

Physics (compulsory/preferred)

Biology (preferred)

Mathematics (preferred)

English (preferred)

A modern language

Computing/technological studies

Physical Education

Can you major in psychology and the go to medical school to become a doctor MD?

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Asked by Wiki User

No, an MD is a medical doctor (physician). A PhD is doctorate degree but is a doctor of philosophy under which many specific programs of study fall.

Note: In High Finance and Investment Banking an MD is a Managing Director, but that's a management role and not a degree, however many of them have PhD degrees. "He's and MD or he was an MD", commonly heard on shows that deal with Wall Street and Capital Markets, Stock Trading, Etc.

Why do you want to go to medical school?

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Asked by Wiki User

If you want to be in the medical field I would recomend this job. It pays well and everything!

Does a psychologist have to go to medical school?

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A Psychologist takes an undergraduate course of study in psychology, then completes a graduate program (at least a Masters degree, but more often a Ph.D in psychology) in order to practice as a Psychologist. At this time (2014), there are some states which allow Psychologists to prescribe a limited number of medications, typically restricted to antidepressants, anxiolytics, antipsychotics and mood stabilizers, after additional pharmacology training. Most medication prescribing is done by Psychiatrists, however, which do go to medical school and complete residency training in Psychiatry.

Why is it so hard to get into medical school?

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Medical school is very competitive probably for a lot of reasons. The curriculum in medical schools is not easy and becoming a physician takes a lot of commitment and a lot of time (several years). To be competitive for medical school, it is very important that a candidate have a high GPA, a strong background in the sciences, research involvement can be helpful, and excellent scores on the MCAT. Experience/exposure to the medical field is often highly regarded and shadowing experience is often looked upon favorably. Letters of recommendation can be an important component of a medical school application as well and should only be written by the appropriate people such as a science professor and should be from someone who definitely knows you well enough to write a personable letter. The medical field is a profession that a lot of people want to be a part of and contributes to the competition of getting into medical school along with the high expectations medical students have for applicants.

What medical schools offer combined undergraduate and medical school programs that lasts 6 years?

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All do in the UK.

To get a degree allowing you to practice medicine in the UK and sit the USMLE in the US (Dr. John Doe, MBBS) takes 5 years, to get a BSc as well takes another years (Dr. John Doe, MBBS, BSc.)

Which bachelor's degree is best to get into medical school?

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While many individuals who pursue a career as a physician major in biology at the undergraduate level, many others come from a variety of other educational backgrounds. You should meet with a career counselor at the college or university you attend for what options exist for you. The important issue is preparing for the appropriate prerequisites required for medical school. The student should have a strong background in the following areas.

  • Biology (cell biology, biology of the organism)
  • Chemistry (inorganic, organic)
  • Physics
  • Communication (written and oral)
  • Higher level math's
  • Computer literacy
  • Development of good critical thinking skills.

Read the following carefully, and follow through on the link provided for detailed information from and according to the U.S. Department of Labor. After reading the below, click on the related links section (U.S. Department of Labor) indicated below this answer box for more detailed information.

The common path to practicing as a physician requires 8 years of education beyond high school and 3 to 8 additional years of internship and residency. All States, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories license physicians.

Education and training. Formal education and training requirements for physicians are among the most demanding of any occupation-4 years of undergraduate school, 4 years of medical school, and 3 to 8 years of internship and residency, depending on the specialty selected. A few medical schools offer combined undergraduate and medical school programs that last 6 years rather than the customary 8 years.

Premedical students must complete undergraduate work in physics, biology, mathematics, English, and inorganic and organic chemistry. Students also take courses in the humanities and the social sciences. Some students volunteer at local hospitals or clinics to gain practical experience in the health professions.

The minimum educational requirement for entry into medical school is 3 years of college; most applicants, however, have at least a bachelor's degree, and many have advanced degrees. There are 146 medical schools in the United States-126 teach allopathic medicine and award a Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) degree; 20 teach osteopathic medicine and award the Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (D.O.) degree.

Acceptance to medical school is highly competitive. Applicants must submit transcripts, scores from the Medical College Admission Test, and letters of recommendation. Schools also consider an applicant's character, personality, leadership qualities, and participation in extracurricular activities. Most schools require an interview with members of the admissions committee.

Students spend most of the first 2 years of medical school in laboratories and classrooms, taking courses such as anatomy, biochemistry, physiology, pharmacology, psychology, microbiology, pathology, medical ethics, and laws governing medicine. They also learn to take medical histories, examine patients, and diagnose illnesses. During their last 2 years, students work with patients under the supervision of experienced physicians in hospitals and clinics, learning acute, chronic, preventive, and rehabilitative care. Through rotations in internal medicine, family practice, obstetrics and gynecology, pediatrics, psychiatry, and surgery, they gain experience in the diagnosis and treatment of illness.

Following medical school, almost all M.D.s enter a residency-graduate medical education in a specialty that takes the form of paid on-the-job training, usually in a hospital. Most D.O.s serve a 12-month rotating internship after graduation and before entering a residency, which may last 2 to 6 years.

A physician's training is costly. According to the Association of American Medical Colleges, in 2004 more than 80 percent of medical school graduates were in debt for educational expenses.

Licensure and certification. All States, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories license physicians. To be licensed, physicians must graduate from an accredited medical school, pass a licensing examination, and complete 1 to 7 years of graduate medical education. Although physicians licensed in one State usually can get a license to practice in another without further examination, some States limit reciprocity. Graduates of foreign medical schools generally can qualify for licensure after passing an examination and completing a U.S. residency.

M.D.s and D.O.s seeking board certification in a specialty may spend up to 7 years in residency training, depending on the specialty. A final examination immediately after residency or after 1 or 2 years of practice also is necessary for certification by a member board of the American Board of Medical Specialists (ABMS) or the American Osteopathic Association (AOA). The ABMS represents 24 boards related to medical specialties ranging from allergy and immunology to urology. The AOA has approved 18 specialty boards, ranging from anesthesiology to surgery. For certification in a subspecialty, physicians usually need another 1 to 2 years of residency.

Other qualifications. People who wish to become physicians must have a desire to serve patients, be self-motivated, and be able to survive the pressures and long hours of medical education and practice. Physicians also must have a good bedside manner, emotional stability, and the ability to make decisions in emergencies. Prospective physicians must be willing to study throughout their career to keep up with medical advances.

Advancement. Some physicians and surgeons advance by gaining expertise in specialties and subspecialties and by developing a reputation for excellence among their peers and patients. Many physicians and surgeons start their own practice or join a group practice. Others teach residents and other new doctors, and some advance to supervisory and managerial roles in hospitals, clinics, and other settings.

For the source and more detailed information concerning this request, click on the related links section (U.S. Department of Labor) indicated below this answer box.
First, at the undergraduate level there is no such thing as a degree in pre-med. It is a curriculum layout or sometimes referred to as a tract, which prepares students who intend to seek admission to medical schools. It includes activities such as prerequisite coursework, clinical experience, volunteer activities, and research.

While many individuals who pursue a career as a physician major in biology at the undergraduate level, many others come from a variety of other educational backgrounds. The best major should be based on a contingency plan. In other words, what happens if you do not go to medical school? What will you be able to do with the degree that you have, and will it provide you with a satisfying career or career path? You should meet with a career counselor at the college or university you attend for what options exist for you. Whichever major you choose, the critical issue is acquiring the appropriate prerequisite coursework required by medical schools. The student should have a strong background in the following areas.

  • Biology (cell biology, biology of the organism)
  • Chemistry (inorganic, organic)
  • Physics
  • Communication (written and oral)
  • Higher level math's (algebra, trigonometry, calculus)
  • Computer literacy
  • Development of good critical thinking skills.

For more detailed information concerning this request, click on the related links section (U.S. Department of Labor) indicated below this answer box.

What do you do after Medical school?

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The following is written by and according to the U.S. Department of Labor and particular to the education and training required for veterinarians.

Veterinarians must obtain a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree and a State license. There is keen competition for admission to veterinary school.

Education and training. Prospective veterinarians must graduate with a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (D.V.M. or V.M.D.) degree from a 4-year program at an accredited college of veterinary medicine. There are 28 colleges in 26 States that meet accreditation standards set by the Council on Education of the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA).
The prerequisites for admission to veterinary programs vary. Many programs do not require a bachelor's degree for entrance, but all require a significant number of credit hours-ranging from 45 to 90 semester hours-at the undergraduate level. However, most of the students admitted have completed an undergraduate program and earned a bachelor's degree. Applicants without a degree face a difficult task gaining admittance.
Preveterinary courses should emphasize the sciences. Veterinary medical colleges typically require applicants to have taken classes in organic and inorganic chemistry, physics, biochemistry, general biology, animal biology, animal nutrition, genetics, vertebrate embryology, cellular biology, microbiology, zoology, and systemic physiology. Some programs require calculus; some require only statistics, college algebra and trigonometry, or pre-calculus. Most veterinary medical colleges also require some courses in English or literature, other humanities, and the social sciences. Increasingly, courses in general business management and career development have become a standard part of the curriculum to teach new graduates how to effectively run a practice.
In addition to satisfying preveterinary course requirements, applicants must submit test scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), the Veterinary College Admission Test (VCAT), or the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), depending on the preference of the college to which they are applying. Currently, 22 schools require the GRE, 4 require the VCAT, and 2 accept the MCAT.
There is keen competition for admission to veterinary school. The number of accredited veterinary colleges has remained largely the same since 1983, but the number of applicants has risen significantly. Only about 1 in 3 applicants was accepted in 2005.
New graduates with a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree may begin to practice veterinary medicine once they receive their license, but many new graduates choose to enter a 1-year internship. Interns receive a small salary but often find that their internship experience leads to better paying opportunities later, relative to those of other veterinarians. Veterinarians who then seek board certification also must complete a 3- to 4-year residency program that provides intensive training in one of the 20 AVMA-recognized veterinary specialties including internal medicine, oncology, pathology, dentistry, nutrition, radiology, surgery, dermatology, anesthesiology, neurology, cardiology, ophthalmology, preventive medicine, and exotic small-animal medicine.

Licensure. All States and the District of Columbia require that veterinarians be licensed before they can practice. The only exemptions are for veterinarians working for some Federal agencies and some State governments. Licensing is controlled by the States and is not strictly uniform, although all States require the successful completion of the D.V.M. degree-or equivalent education-and a passing grade on a national board examination, the North American Veterinary Licensing Exam. This 8-hour examination consists of 360 multiple-choice questions covering all aspects of veterinary medicine as well as visual materials designed to test diagnostic skills.
The Educational Commission for Foreign Veterinary Graduates grants certification to individuals trained outside the United States who demonstrate that they meet specified requirements for English language and clinical proficiency. This certification fulfills the educational requirement for licensure in all States.
Most States also require candidates to pass a State jurisprudence examination covering State laws and regulations. Some States do additional testing on clinical competency as well. There are few reciprocal agreements between States, veterinarians who wish to practice in a different State usually must first pass that State's examinations.

Other qualifications. When deciding whom to admit, some veterinary medical colleges place heavy consideration on a candidate's veterinary and animal experience. Formal experience, such as work with veterinarians or scientists in clinics, agribusiness, research, or some area of health science, is particularly advantageous. Less formal experience, such as working with animals on a farm or ranch or at a stable or animal shelter, also can be helpful. Students must demonstrate ambition and an eagerness to work with animals.
Prospective veterinarians must have good manual dexterity. They should have an affinity for animals and the ability to get along with their owners, especially pet owners, who usually have strong bonds with their pets. Veterinarians who intend to go into private practice should possess excellent communication and business skills, because they will need to manage their practice and employees successfully and to promote, market, and sell their services.

Advancement. Most veterinarians begin as employees in established group practices. Despite the substantial financial investment in equipment, office space, and staff, many veterinarians with experience eventually set up their own practice or purchase an established one.
Newly trained veterinarians can become U.S. Government meat and poultry inspectors, disease-control workers, animal welfare and safety workers, epidemiologists, research assistants, or commissioned officers in the U.S. Public Health Service or various branches of the U.S. Armed Forces. A State license may be required.
Nearly all States have continuing education requirements for licensed veterinarians. Requirements differ by State and may involve attending a class or otherwise demonstrating knowledge of recent medical and veterinary advances.

For the source and more detailed information concerning your request, click on the related links section (U.S. Department of Labor) indicated directly below this answer section.

What is the location address of harvard medical school?

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Asked by AfsanaRahmanfb9739

The address and telephone number for Harvard University is:

Harvard University

University Hall

Cambridge, MA 02138-3800

MA Tel. 617-495-1000

Fax 617-495-0754

Does a Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine go to medical school?

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Asked by Wiki User

Yes, Doctors of Osteopathic Medicine trained in the United States (not to be confused with Doctors of Osteopathy trained abroad) do attend four years of medical school. Doctors of Osteopathic Medicine (D.O.) and Doctors of Medicine (M.D.) are both full-fledged physicians trained in the United States who attend four years of medical school and are eligible to specialize in any field of medicine after residency training. Additionally, both DOs and MDs may sit for board certification examinations and each type of physician has the same legal and medical responsibilities such as prescribing medications, performing surgery, working in the hospital, medical diagnosis, etc. The difference between a Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine and Doctor of Medicine is a slight one-Doctors of Osteopathic Medicine, in addition to the standard medical curriculum, receive 300-500 hours of instruction in a form of manual therapy known as osteopathic manipulative medicine (OMM). This form of therapy is another approach sometimes used by DOs to address a patient's musculoskeletal issues.

What classes should you take in high school in order to go to medical school?

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Asked by Wiki User

probably an anatomy/phsyiology couse and an early childhood course. that's what im going to take and I want to be a pediatric Neurologist. same with my bff conor and he's becoming a pediatric oncologist

Is dhaka national medical college recognized by WHO?

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Asked by Wiki User

WHO's most recent book was published in 2000 so it's not up to date but in 2007, they were supposed to start a new online database which is still under development.

http://www.who.int/hrh/documents/wdms_upgrade/en/index.HTML

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Directory_of_Medical_Schools

according to wikipedia,

"The University of Copenhagen will run it in collaboration with WHO, the World Federation for Medical Education (WFME), the Foundation for the Advancement of International Medical Education and Research (FAIMER), International Pharmaceutical Federation and other partners."

so i am guessing it is safe to say that anything under FAIMER will be in the WHO database...

and here is a current list of medical schools in Bangladesh on the list of being recognized

http://imed.ecfmg.org/results.asp?country=160&school=&currpage=1&cname=BANGLADESH&city=&region=AS&rname=Asia&psize=25

Khulna IS on that FIAMER list so it should be recognized when the new WHO Directory of Medical Schools database is out

What is the store keeper responsibilities?

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Asked by Wiki User

1- Receives and inspects all incoming materials and reconciles with purchase orders; processes and distributes documentation with purchase orders; reports, documents and tracks damages and discrepancies on orders received.

2- Receives and stores documents and confidential files; maintains record of approved document and confidential file destruction. Maintains the warehouse, records area and stores area in a neat and orderly manner.