Monarchy

Monarchy is a form of government in which all political power is vested in a monarch, usually a king or a queen. The monarch rules the nation, and acts as the head of state until his/her death or abdication.

Asked in William Shakespeare, Monarchy

Which two monarchs reigned when William Shakespeare was alive?

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William Shakespeare, the great English playwright, poet and actor, was born in April 1564, and died on 23 April 1616. The two monarchs whose lives coincided with his were: Queen Elizabeth I - reigned from 17th November 1558 until her death on 24th March 1603. This was the Elizabethan Era, sometimes known as The Golden Age. King James I (who was also King James VI of Scotland) reigned in England from 24th March 1603 until his death on 27th March 1625. His reign is known as the Jacobean era, Jacob being an alternative form of James.
Asked in History of France, French Revolution, Monarchy

How many sons did King Louis XVI have?

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Two, the oldest died as a child of Tuberculosis and Louis XVII died at the age of 10 while in prison.
Asked in Monarchy, Nevada

Where is Wendover?

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Wendover is in Utah
Asked in Elizabeth I, Monarchy

What was Queen Elizabeth's I's maiden name?

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She was a Tudor so she was Elizabeth Tudor as Queen Elizabeth II is Elizabeth Windsor.
Asked in History of England, Shopping, Monarchy, Prince Charles

What happen to Charles Fingerhut bakery in Cicero?

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Fingerhut Bakery is coming back soon.... Chas. Fingerhut Bakery was started in 1895 by John Fingerhut who brought to this country from Czechoslovakia the now famous Babi Rye Bread. From John to his son Charles who took over the business in 1928, to his son Herb Sr. who took over the business in 1855, to Herb Jr. who ran the bakery until January 2000. Herb is now a consultant in the bakery and food industry. Herb is also writting a new autobiograghy on his life in the bakery business as well as making this a unique baking cookbook with over 120 family formulas, but the difference is, there will be a receipe size for the home as well as a larger size for the retail/wholeslae baker! FYI: Fingerhut Bakery is on its way back (but in web form only for now) Starting on February 15, 2008 an all new Fingerhut Bakery will be back with an updated logo, and with a twist to the old favorites like Houska Bread, Babi Rye Bread, kolacky and many more items...... check the coming soon page at www.fingerhutbakery.com
Asked in History of England, Monarchy, Henry VIII

Who were the six wives of Henry VIII?

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Answer King Henry VIII of England was born on 28th June 1491. He became King of England when his father died on 21st April 1509, and he reigned until his own death on 28th January 1547. One of the reasons he is famous is that he married six times. His father, King Henry VII had become King of England after defeating King Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth Field in the year 1485. This marked the end of a long and bloody Civil War in England over who should succeed to the throne, known as The Wars of the Roses. The last time a female had inherited the English throne was in the year 1141 when the daughter of King Henry I, Matilda became Queen and was deposed by her cousin, Stephen of Blois. This led to a long Civil War known as "The Anarchy." Henry VIII was keen to avoid another, similar Civil War and wanted to have a son who would be an undisputed, male heir to the throne. This was the main reason why he married so many times. His wives were: Catherine of Aragon, born 16th December 1485. Catherine was an Infanta, or princess, of Castile in Spain. Her parents were Ferdinand II of Aragon and his wife, Isabella I of Castile. She had previously been married to Henry VIII's older brother, Arthur in an arranged marriage aimed at strengthening the alliance between Spain and England. Arthur had died, aged 16, on 2nd April 1502. Still wishing to maintain the alliance, Henry and Catherine were married on 11th June 1509. They had required permission from The Pope, known as a Dispensation, allowing Henry to marry his brother's widow, which was given on the grounds that Catherine and Arthur's marriage had not been consummated, meaning that they had never had sex. Henry and Catherine had a stillborn daughter in January 1510 and in January 1511 a son who only survived for fifty-two days. Another stillborn daughter was born in December 1514 and on 18th February 1516 she gave birth to a daughter, Mary, their only child to survive beyond infancy. Mary later became Queen Mary I of England. Catherine finally gave birth to another stillborn daughter in November 1518. After her marriage was annulled (see under Anne Boleyn below) the King would only refer to her as "The Dowager Princess of Wales" in honour of his brother, Catherine's first husband. Catherine died on 7th January 1536, probably from cancer. Anne Boleyn, born around 1501. Anne was the daughter of Sir Thomas Boleyn and his wife, Lady Elizabeth. She appeared at King Henry's Court at a Ball in 1522, performing a dance with other ladies of the court and her sister, Mary who was King Henry's mistress. With no sign of Catherine producing a male heir to the throne, King Henry began to pursue Anne, although at first she famously refused to sleep with him before marriage. In order to marry Anne, the King's marriage to Catherine would have to be annulled. This annulment lead to the King's break with Rome, and the establishment Henry as the Head of the Church in England.. The details of this are the answer to a wholly different question! Henry secretly married Anne Boleyn in January 1533 and had Archbishop Cranmer declare his marriage to Catherine unlawful and his new marriage legitimate. Anne was already pregnant when they married and on 17th September 1533 she gave birth to a daughter, Elizabeth, who would later become Queen Elizabeth I of England. Anne had one miscarriage of a baby in the summer 1534 and another in January 1536, on the day of Catherine of Aragon's funeral. King Henry declared the opinion that his marriage was cursed by God and he had already met Jane Seymour, who would become his third wife. In May 1536 Anne was arrested and charged with Treason, Witchcraft and Incest (the allegation was that she had sex with her own brother.) She was found guilty and was executed by beheading at the Tower of London on 19th May 1536. Most historians believe she was entirely innocent and that the charges were brought against her by enemies at court and those who wished to gain the favour of King Henry by enabling him to be free to marry again. Jane Seymour born about 1509. Jane Seymour was the daughter of Sir John Seymour, a knight and servant of King Henry and his wife, Margaret Wentworth. She came to the Royal Court in the year 1530, as a Lady In Waiting to Queen Catherine (of Aragon) and continued to serve Queen Anne (Boleyn) after the King's marriage to Catherine was annulled. It is thought that she first came to King Henry's attention when he stayed at her father's house in September 1535. It may be that his attraction for Jane made it easier for him to believe the false accusations made against Anne Boleyn. Henry and Jane were betrothed on 20th May 1536, the day after Anne's execution, and were married on 30th May 1536. Jane gave birth to baby boy, Edward on 12th October 1537. He would later become King Edward VI of England. Jane became seriously ill after the birth, from a form of septicaemia and she died on 24th October 1537. Anne of Cleves born on 22nd September 1515 in Dusseldorf, Germany. Her parents were John, Duke of Cleves and Maria of Julich-Berg. Henry was still eager to ensure the succession to the throne and wanted to marry again in case his son was not able to succeed him. His chief minister, Thomas Cromwell had suggested Anne of Cleves as his next wife and the court painter Hans Holbein was sent to Cleves to make a portrait of her. After seeing the portrait, and hearing favourable descriptions of her, Henry agreed to the marriage. When she arrived in England, Henry found her deeply unattractive, describing her as "The Flanders Mare." They were, however married on 6th January 1540. When Henry wanted to end the marriage, Anne testified that it had never been consummated and the marriage was annulled on 9th July 1540 on the grounds that Anne had been contracted to marry another European Nobleman. She was accorded the title "The King's Sister" and was given Hever Castle, the former home of Anne Boleyn's family. She stayed in England until her death on 16th July 1557 - she outlived Henry and all his other wives. Catherine Howard born between 1520 and 1525. Catherine was the daughter of Lord Edmund Howard and his second wife, Joyce Culpeper. She came to the Royal Court as a Lady In Waiting to Anne of Cleves. King Henry was still eager to have more sons in order to secure the line of succession and he married Catherine Howard on 28th July 1540, a few weeks after the annulment of his marriage to Anne of Cleves. He was deeply smitten with his new, young bride and gave her many expensive gifts of jewellery and clothes. Catherine had several love affairs both before and after her marriage to King Henry - with a man who had been her music teacher when she was a young girl and with Francis Dereham, an official at Hampton Court. When this became known, King Henry at first refused to believe it until evidence was produced. Catherine was arrested and tried for Treason in 1541. It was determined that adultery by the Queen was treason. She was found guilty and executed by beheading on 13th February 1542. Catherine Parr born around 1512. Catherine was the daughter of Sir Thomas Parr, an English nobleman from Kendall in the North West of England, and his wife, Maud Green. In 1529, aged about 15, Catherine had married Edward Borough, Baron of Gainsborough, who died in 1533. They had no children. In 1534 she married John Nevill, Baron Latymer from Yorkshire in England. Baron Latymer was a frequent visitor to Henry's Court and it was probably on one of these visits that she first met the King. Baron Latymer died in March 1543 and again there were no children. After the death of her second husband she began a relationship with Thomas Seymour, the brother of Henry's third wife, Jane Seymour but she felt she could not decline the attentions of the King. She married King Henry on 12th July 1543 at Hampton Court Palace in London. She was a good stepmother to Henry's three children and helped Henry to become reconciled to his oldest daughter, Mary whose mother was Catherine of Aragon. She is thought to have had a strong influence on the future Queen Elizabeth I, Henry's second daughter. Henry died on 28th January 1547, leaving Catherine free to marry her first love, Thomas Seymour who had by now become Baron Seymour of Sudely. They were married later that same year. Catherine gave birth to a daughter, Mary Seymour, on 30th August 1548 but died a few days later, on 5th September from complications of the birth. Thomas Seymour was executed for treason less than a year later and their daughter Mary went to live with relatives. There seems to be no record of her past her second birthday and many historians believe she died as a child. It is speculated that Henry VIII's numerous marriages were an attempt to ensure the succession of the monarchy. It is also speculated that he loved Jane Seymour more deeply than his other wives, because he is buried alongside her in St. Georges Chapel in Windsor Castle. Though it is said that the two wives who were excuted underwent due process of the law, Henry removed the Roman Catholic Church in order to have his personal agenda approved. The Roman Catholic Church was the Court of Appeals. Hence, Henry removed any chance of true 'due process of the law.' == == == ==
Asked in History of England, Monarchy

What are the names of king George vi brothers?

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King George VI had one older brother and three younger brothers The Prince Edward Albert Christian George Andrew Patrick David, Duke of Windsor (King Edward VIII from 20 January 1936 to 11 December 1936) Born 23 June 1894 Died 28 May 1972 The Prince Henry William Frederick Albert, Duke of Gloucester Born 31 March 1900 Died 10 June 1974 The Prince George Edward Alexander Edmund, Duke of Kent Born 20 December 1902 Died 25 August 1942 The Prince John Charles Francis Born 12 July 1905 Died 18 January 1919
Asked in United Kingdom, Monarchy, Elizabeth II

Who succeeds the queen of The United Kingdom?

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Succession is dependant on who is the closest blood relative. In the current case, Queen Elizabeth the II, her son Charles is next in line.
Asked in Monarchy, Hobbies & Collectibles

What is the value of a King Edward Imperial cigar box?

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Sadly they are not worth all that much but you can fetch up to $14 on eBay if you're lucky.
Asked in Monarchy, Royal Family

Where is the home of the British Monarch?

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Technically, the official residence of the British Monarch is St James' Palace, London. However, no monarch has resided there for over 200 years. The official London residence is Buckingham Palace, while Windsor Castle and the Palace of Holyroodhouse act as the official county and Scotland residences respectively. Queen Elizabeth II also can reside at four private residences: Sandringham House, Balmoral Castle, Craigowan Lodge and Delnadamph Lodge.
Asked in History of England, Monarchy

Who was the English monarch in 1540?

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The king of England in 1540 was Henry VIII, and the Consort Queen was Anne of Cleves from 6th January until 9th July when her marriage to Henry was annulled. He then married Catherine Howard on 28th July 1540.
Asked in History of England, Monarchy, Lady Jane Grey

Did Lady Jane Grey marry King Edward VI?

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No she didn't but Thomas Seymour (Edward's maternal uncle) wanted them to marry so he bought the wardship of Jane and then made an attempt to kidnap Edward. This attempt failed because Edward's dog started barking so Seymour shot it and the noise brought guards who arrested Seymour. He was later executed for treason. Jane was married to Guilford Dudley and Edward was at a time betrothed to Mary Queen of Scots and Princess Elisabeth of France.
Asked in Politics and Government, Monarchy

What countries have a king or queen?

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Monarchies around the world Africa Lesotho - King Letsie III Morocco - King Mohammed VI Swaziland - King Mswati III Asia Bhutan - King Jigme Khesar Namgyal Wangchuck Brunei - Sultan Haji Hassanal Bolkiiah Cambodia - King Norodom Sihamoni Japan - Emperor Akihito Malaysia - Tuanku Abdul Halim Thailand - King Bhumibol Adulyadej Europe Andorra - Princes Nicolas Sarkozy and Joan Enric Vives Sicilia Belgium - King Albert II Denmark - Queen Margarethe II Liechtenstein - Prince Hans Adam II Luxembourg - Grand Duke Henri Monaco - Prince Albert II Netherlands - King Willem-Alexander Norway - King Harald V Spain - King Juan Carlos I Sweden - King Carl Gustaf XVI United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - Queen Elizabeth II Middle East Bahrain - King Hamad bin Isa al-Khalifa Jordan - King Abdullah II Kuwait - Emir Sabah Al-Ahmed Al Jaber Al-Sabah Oman - Sultan Oabus ibn Sa'id Qatar - Emir Sheik Hamad ibn Khalifa al-Thani Saudi Arabia - King Abdullah bin Abdulaziz al-Saud United Arab Emirates - Sheik Khalifa bin Zayed Al Nahyan Other Tonga - King George Tupou V. That's 31 unless I've mis-counted. Countries with Constitutional Monarchies with Ceremonial Monarchs Andorra Antigua and Barbuda Australia Bahamas Barbados Belgium Belize Cambodia Canada Denmark Grenada Jamaica Japan Lesotho Luxembourg Malaysia Netherlands New Zealand Norway Papua New Guinea Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Solomon Islands Spain Sweden Thailand Tuvalu United Kingdom Countries with Constitutional Monarchies with Active Monarchs (The prime minister is the nation's active executive but the monarch still has considerable political powers that can be used at their own discretion.) Bahrain Bhutan Jordan Kuwait Liechtenstein Monaco Morocco Tonga United Arab Emirates Countries with Absolute Monarchies Brunei Oman Qatar Saudi Arabia Swaziland Currently, 44 Sovereign nations in the world have monarchs acting as heads of state, 16 of which are Commonwealth realms that recognize Queen Elizabeth II as their head of state. All European monarchies are constitutional ones, with the exception of the Vatican City. Countries include England, Cambodia, Japan, Jordan and Malaysia.
Asked in History of England, Scotland, Monarchy

What did King Charles do upset Scotland?

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Charles I, tried to force the Scots to use an English Prayer book, they refused and invaded England. The Bishops' wars cost a lot of money and Charles I, could not afford this so had to ask Parliament for money, and that proceeded after 11 years.
Asked in History of England, Monarchy, Henry VIII

When did Henry VIII go to war Scotland?

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He didn't go into a big official war but there was the Battle of Flodden Field in 1513 which was defensive after the Scottish invaded. There was also border raids and retaliation for Scottish border raids. Then towards the end of his reign there was the 'rough wooing' of Mary Queen of Scots where the Earl of Hertford lead soldiers into Scotland so that they could burn and destroy towns/villages until the Scots agreed to a betrothal between Mary Queen of Scots and Prince Edward.
Asked in Monarchy

Henry ll count of?

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Anjou and Nantes
Asked in Monarchy, Absolutism (Political)

Is absolute monarchy a good or bad thing?

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It depends on the culture, the nation, and the ruler. For example, if the nation is very small (IE: a small island in an archipelago), then there is little need of a fragmented government system. In a larger nation (IE: France in the 1700s), an absolute monarchy would not work as there are just too many people to rule over without delegation. Again, it also depends on the ruler itself. A just, compassionate absolute monarch will put his or her people above personal gain. However, this does cause problems when the throne passes to someone else, someone who may not be as good as the previous ruler. Further answer It also depends on what powers the monarch has. In today's England the monarch has very little actual power and is largely a figurehead. But in say Henry VIII's day the monarch had very much more power. It would also depend on the monarch - some were good, some were bad. Just like governments and dictators!
Asked in History of England, Monarchy, Henry VIII

Why did Henry VIII kill Robert Aske?

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Robert Aske helped to lead the 'Pilgrimage of the Grace' rebellion against Henry VIII's religious reforms. Aske was invited to court to talk to the King and privy council, they then lied to him and said that his demands would be met and pardons would be issued. When Aske returned to the North he was arrested alongside other rebel leaders and people who had been involved. Aske was then hung in chains from York minster.
Asked in History of England, Monarchy, Royal Family, England

Who was the first King or Queen of England?

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The first king to rule all of England as king was Athelstan, grandson of Alfred the Great. His forebears were kings of Wessex, to which they attached Kent; it was Athelstan who united Mercia and Northumbria to Wessex to create the united English kingdom. However, there are a few tricky points of terminology: Athelstan's title was "king of the English", not "king of England". Same thing really, but the first to be king of the English land rather than of the English people was Henry II. Before there was a single kingdom, several rulers had be accepted as overlord over all the English kings. Among those was Alfred the Great's grandfather Egbert, king of Wessex, and before him Offa, King of Mercia House of Wessex: Egbert Athelwulf Athelbald Athelbert Ethelred I Alfred (the Great) Edward (the Elder) Athelstan *First King of ALL England* Edmund I (the Elder, the Deed-Doer) Eadred Eadwig Edgar (the Peaceable) St Edward (the Martyr) Ethelred II (the Unready) House of Denmark: Swen (Forkbeard) House of Wessex Ethelred II (restored) Edmund II (Ironside) House of Denmark Cnut the Great (Canute) Harold I (Harefoot) Harthacnut House of Wessex (restored) St Edward (The Confessor) Harold II Edgar II (the Atheling) House of Normandy: William I (the Bastard, the Conqueror) William II (Rufus) Henry I (Beauclerk) Stephen I (of Blois) or the Empress Mathilda (Maud) House of Plantaganet: Henry II (FitzEmpress, Curtmantle) (Henry the Young King, briefly co-king with his father, Henry II) Richard I (the Lionheart) John (Lackland) Henry III Edward I (Longshanks) Edward II Edward III Richard II House of Lancaster: Henry IV (Bolingbroke) Henry V Henry VI House of York: Edward IV House of Lancaster (restored) Henry VI (restored) House of York (restored) Edward IV (restored) Edward V Richard III House of Tudor: Henry VII Henry VIII Edward VI Jane Mary I (Bloody Mary) Elizabeth I (the Virgin Queen) House of Stuart James I & VI Charles I The Commonwealth The House of Stuart (restored) Charles II James II House of Stuart/House of Orange Mary II & William III House of Orange William III House of Stuart Anne House of Hanover George I George II George III George IV William IV Victoria House of Sax-Coburg-und-Gotha Edward VII George V House of "Windsor" George V Edward VIII George VI Elizabeth II
Asked in Monarchy, History of England, War and Military History

Who was the first King of England?

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The first king of all England was Athelstan (c895-939). He became king in 925. Despite any fleeting allegiances they may have wrought, the seven kings previous to Athelstan are known by historians as the 'Kings of Wessex'. Alfred the Great's grandson. King Aethelstan (924- 39) All prior leaders were only kings of Wessex. House of Wessex: Egbert Athelwulf Athelbald Athelbert Ethelred I Alfred (the Great) Edward (the Elder) Athelstan (the Glorius) *First King of ALL England* Edmund I(the Magnificent) Edred Edwy (All Fair) Edgar (the Peaceable) St Edward (the Matyr) Ethelred II (the Unready) House of Denmark: Swen (Forkbeard) House of Wessex and the House of Denmark Ethelred II (restored) Edmund II (Ironside) and Canute House of Denmark: Canute Harold I (Harefoot) Hardicanute House of Wessex (restored) St Edward (The Confessor) Harold II Edgar II (the Atheling) House of Normandy: William I (William the conquerer) William II (William the Rufus) Henry I Stephen I(of Blois) The Empress Mathilda(Maud) House of Plantaganet: Henry II (Henry the Young King, ruled breifly with his father, Henry II until his death) Richard I(The Lionheart) John (Lackland) Henry III Edward I(Longshanks) Edward II Edward III Richard II House of Lancaster: Henry IV (Bolingbroke) Henry V Henry VI House of York: Edward IV Edward V Richard III House of Tudor: Henry VII Henry VIII(King Hal) Edward VI Jane(Nine Days Queen) Mary I(Bloody Mary) Elizabeth I(The Virgin Queen) House of Stuart: James I Charles I Commonwealth(the protectorate): Oliver Cromwell Richard Cromwell House of Stuart(after the restoration): Charles II James II William III (of Orange) and Mary II (ruled jointly) House of Orange: William III(alone) House of Stuart: Anne House of Hanover: George I George II George III(Farmer George) George IV William IV(Reform Bill) Victoria House of Saxe-Coburg: Edward George V VII House of Windsor: George V Edward VIII George VI Elizabeth II edger was the first king of England and crowned in Bath England
Asked in Queen Victoria, Monarchy, Royal Family

What was prince albert's royal house?

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Prince Francis (Albert) Augustus Charles Emmanuel; 26 August 1819 - 14 December 1861), the Prince Consort of Queen Victoria, was from the House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha.
Asked in History of England, Monarchy

Who were the Stuarts and the Tudors of England?

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The Stuarts, original Scottish spelling 'Stewart', were the hereditary 'stewards' of Scotland, hence their name. They eventually gained the Scottish crown in the late 14th century. On the death of Elizabeth I childless, James VI of Scotland was offered the Crown of England as James I. He and his successors ruled as Charles I, Charles II, James II, (William and) Mary Stuart and Anne. James II was overthrown, but maintained he was the rightful King of England and his son and grandson (Bonnie Prince Charlie) were responsible for the Jacobite rebellions of 1715 and 1745. The last Stuart pretender to the British Crown, nominally Henry XI died in the late 18th century. The current British Royal Family are descended in part for the Stuarts for the crown was settled on the successors to Sophie, Electress of Hannover following the death of Queen Anne childless, She was the granddaughter of the Winter Queen, the sister of Charles I.
Asked in Monarchy

Who was Queen of England in 1770?

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There has not been a Queen (or King) of England since 1707. In 1770, the British Monarch was King George III and he was King of The United Kingdom of Great Britain and, separately, King of Ireland. His wife, and Queen Consort, was Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz.