Mormon (LDS) Temples

An LDS Temple is a place where special ordinances are performed. Only members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints are allowed to enter a temple. This is a place of peace.

Asked in Mormonism, Mormon (LDS) Temples

How many LDS temples are there in Brazil?

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There are currently (June 2015) seven temples of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Brazil. These are located in Manaus, Fortaleza, Recife, Campinas, Sao Paulo, Curitiba, and Porto Alegre. There is one temple being planned for Rio de Janeiro.
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What direction does the angel moroni face on top of a Mormon temple?

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The Angel Moroni typically faces east. Presumably this is symbolic of Moroni heralding the Second Coming of Jesus Christ, who will come from the east (Matthew 24:27). Not all Moroni statues face east, however. One exception is the Angel Moroni atop the Nauvoo, Illinois Temple. This angel faces to the West in commemoration of the Saints' Trek to the Great Salt Lake Valley from Nauvoo. Other Moroni statues that do not face east are: Accra Ghana (NorthEast); Anchorage Alaska (NorthEast); Apia Samoa (SouthWest); Boise Idaho (South); Buenos Aires Argentina (SouthEast); Chicago Illinois (North); Dallas Texas (South); Johannesburg South Africa (South); Kona Hawaii (NorthEast); London England (South); Manhattan New York (SouthWest); Manila Philippines (West); Mexico City Mexico (south); Nuku'Alofa Tonga (West); Oaxaca Mexico (SouthEast); St. Louis Missouri (South); Santiago Chile (South); Seattle Washington (West); Seoul Korea (south); Stockholm Sweden (south); Suva Fiji (south); Taipei Taiwan (west); and Veracruz Mexico (west). Temples with no Angel Moroni statue are Cardston Alberta; Hamilton New Zealand; Laie Hawaii; Logan Utah; Manti Utah; Oakland California; and St. George Utah.
Asked in Weddings, Mormon (LDS) Temples

Can a couple have a normal wedding and then get married in the LDS temple later on?

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Yes, absolutely! But it needs to be kept in mind that Latter-day Saints [Mormons] believe that marriage outside the temple is just a contract for life. When the minister or celebrant marries the couple, the contract is "...until death do you part", and that is all the authority that can be spanned. LDS believe that holy temples of God are in place so that couples can be married not only "for time" on earth, but for all Eternity, as well. A couple who marries in a "normal wedding" can later marry (be sealed) in the temple provided they become/are worthy to receive a temple recommend - so that they can enter the temple and be sealed to each other. Marriage in the temple is about being sealed to your significant other for time and all eternity. If children are born into a family before the couple enters the temple they will bring their children with them to be sealed as an eternal family altogether. Note, though, that is the requirement in most countries except for the United States. Outside of the US, most governments do not recognize weddings performed within temples of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and therefore the Church itself, abiding the Law, requires that the participants receive a civil marraige before they are allowed to be married in the temple. Within the US, it is possible, but less common, to have a civil marriage before a temple marriage. However, it is important to note that in countries where marriages in the temple are recognized, there is a one year waiting period before the couple can be sealed, if they elect to marry civilly first. Answer The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (often misnamed the Mormon Church) encourages all its members to get married in Mormon temples. This is because Latter-day Saints believe that families can (and should) be together forever, but this blessing is only available in Mormon temples. If a couple chooses to get married and, for whatever reason-lack of worthiness, lack of membership in the Church, lack of funds to get to a temple, etc.-do not get married in an LDS temple, this does not mean they can never qualify for the blessings available in the temple. The standards for people attending LDS temples is very high because people covenant there to live much higher standards, and the consequences for breaking those covenants are severe. Thus, only those who are really prepared to take on those commitments are allowed in the temple. Any civil marriage (a legally recognized union between a man and a woman) can be sealed by the power of the priesthood in an LDS temple one year after the civil ceremony takes place. If a couple joins The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and wants to be sealed in an LDS temple, they must wait for a year from their baptismal date. Again, this is because of the seriousness of covenants made in LDS temples. The year gives individuals a chance to learn more about the gospel of Jesus Christ and to gain a deeper appreciation and understanding of temple covenants before making them. All people are invited to qualify for the blessing available in LDS temples.
Asked in Mormonism, Mormon (LDS) Temples

How many Mormon Temples in Utah alone?

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Currently 11, with 3 more planned.
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How many lds temples are in the world in 2011?

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As of August 2011, there will be 135 temples in use, 11 under construction, and 14 announced. Check out the "Related Link" below for an updated list.
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Who is the angel on top of Mormon temples?

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The angel on top of Mormon temples is a representation of the angel Moroni. Members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormons) believe that the angel Moroni appeared to Joseph Smith in the 1820s and showed him where the gold plates were buried. Moroni buried them there about AD 400 (1400 years before Joseph Smith found them). When Joseph Smith translated the gold plates, he published his translation as The Book of Mormon, and that the Book of Mormon contains the fullness of the Gospel of Jesus Christ, as was taught among the ancient inhabitants of the Americas thousands of years ago.
Asked in Mormonism, Mormon (LDS) Temples

How many LDS temples are there in Utah?

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There are currently (in 2010) 13 temples operating in Utah and 2 under construction. The temples in Utah are: St. George Logan Manti Salt Lake Ogden Provo Jordan River (in South Jordan) Bountiful Mount Timpanogos (in American Fork) Vernal Monticello Draper Oquirrh Mountain (In South Jordan) Those under construction are: Brigham City Payson
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How many lds temples are there in the US?

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There are 65 operating temples of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in the United States. 7 additional temples are under construction in the US. These are in Brigham City, Utah; Fort Lauderdale, Florida; Gila Valley, Gilbert, and Phoenix, Arizona; Kansas City, Missouri; and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. To see the locations and photographs of each temple or to learn about when the temples currently under construction will be open for public tours, visit the "Related Links" below.
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What state has the most LDS temples?

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As of October 2010, Utah has the most LDS temples with 15. California follows with 7. Arizona has 5, and Idaho and Texas each have 4. Please note that a Temple is different than a Church or Meetinghouse, which hold regular congregation worship services. The states with the most congregations/church buildings are the same: Utah has the most (approximately 4,400 congregations), followed by California (approximately 1,250 congregations), Idaho (1,000 congregations), Arizona (720 congregations), and Texas (450 congregations).
Asked in Mormonism, Mormon (LDS) Temples

How many Mormon temples in the world?

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As of February 2011, there are 134 operating temples of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (the "Mormon" church) worldwide. An additional 23 are planned or under construction. Please note that a Temple is different than a Meetinghouse or Church, where Sunday services are held. Check out the "Related Link" below to learn the difference between a church and a temple.
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What does the star represent in Mormon temples?

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Masonic Symbols Joseph Smith, being a Freemason, adopted the Star and other Masonic Symbols to adorn LDS Temples. ALTERNATE VIEW: While it is true Joseph Smith was a Freemason (of the York rite), it is unclear how much such an association would have influenced the design of the Nauvoo Temple in the early 1840s. Minutes from the Masonic Lodge "Under Dispensation" in Nauvoo during the time period show that Smith was not a regular attender of the lodge's meetings.One historian wrote: "It seams from the meager records that are extant, that Joseph Smith attended as many meetings on those two days [when he was admitted as a Mason] as he did during the rest of his lifetime" (McGavin, Mormonism and Masonry, 90). It must also be pointed out that construction of the Nauvoo Temple began prior to Smith's becoming a Freemason in 1842. Furthermore, Smith's followers constructed a temple in Kirtland, Ohio in the early 1830s. Other such edifices were planned in Independence, Far West, and Adam-ondi-ahman, all in Missouri, prior to the 1838 Missouri Mormon War. (The Kirtland Temple bears no clear symbolism of the star, moon, or sun.) This does not mean he could not have incorporated the star for reasons associated with Freemasonry, but it is unlikely. A more plausible explanation has already been noted below; that is, the star was most likely associated with the Mormon theology of the afterlife, specifically that of the telestial kingdom. Answer The five-pointed star was used in the Nauvoo Temple and other early temples, but it's meaning was wholesome. Inverted stars did not generally become associated with the occult until after the time of Joseph Smith. Stars, including inverted stars, were used by early Christians as valid Christian symbols. The symbol of the star - whether it has five or six points - and the pentagram can be used for good or evil purposes. The fact that Satan worshipers have given evil meanings to the star, the moon, or whatever does not make the symbols inherently evil. Though the symbols in Masonry, and as seen upon some temples of the Mormons are the same and similar in some cases, it does not mean that the interpretation of such symbols are the same. The symbols go back to time immemorial, and have been corrupted, and contain many errors or alterations. The Masons may have the symbols but their understanding of them is misunderstood, their signs are not used as part of holy ordinances, but as signs of recognition or some other use not related to gospel principles. Every symbol on a Mormon Temple has the same meaning as it did when they were used in biblical times. Alternate Answer Stars symbolize heavenly things, reminding us to lift our sights from worldly things and to consider things of eternal significance. In Mormonism, they are likely to refer to the Telestial Glory, whose glory is compared to that of the stars, in contrast to Terrestrial Glory, which is compared to that of the Moon, and to the glory of the Celestial Glory, which is compared to that of the Sun. More on this can be found in D&C 76 and 1 Cor 15. Christian Symbols Found in Stars The star seen as a pentagram can also be found not only as a Masonic symbol but as a Christian symbol. A particular meaning of the pentagram can be found within the story Sir Gawain and The Green Knight. The star in it's symbolism in this story represents the five wounds of Christ as well as the five chivalric virtues.
Asked in Mormonism, Demographics, Mormon (LDS) Temples

How many Mormons are there in the world?

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The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (commonly known as the LDS Church, or the Mormon Church) reported 13,824,854 worldwide members on record in October 2010. There are other groups which have broken away from the LDS Church, but still call themselves Mormon. For example, the Community of Christ (formerly the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints) has about 250,000 members. The polygamist Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is estimated to have between 6,000 and 10,000 members. There is some debate, however, as to how accurately membership records reflect the number of people who actually consider themselves to be Mormons. For example, the rate of activity (people who actually go to church regularly) in the LDS Church has been estimated at around 35% worldwide, which would put the number of active Latter-day Saints at under 5 million. See related links for a list of stats and facts about the LDS Church. Official 2009 Year-end Records of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (commonly called the "Mormon" Church) state that there are 13,750,651 baptized members of the Church worldwide.
Asked in Mormonism, Mormon (LDS) Temples

What are the top largest lds temples?

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The five largest temples of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (commonly called the "Mormon" church) by square footage are: Salt Lake Temple: 385,000 square feet Los Angeles California: 190,614 square feet Washington D.C.: 160,000 square feet Jordan River Utah: 148,236 square feet Provo Utah: 128,325 square feet The tallest temple is Washington D.C., it is 288 feet tall. The Salt Lake Temple comes close at 210 feet tall. You can see all the temples of the Church organized in order of size by square feet at the "Related Link" below.
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How long do Mormon temple recommends last?

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Currently, a regular adult recommend is valid for two years, although of course it can be surrendered or revoked at any time.
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How long did it take to build the Mormon temple?

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That depends on which temple you are talking about. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (commonly called the "Mormon" Church) currently has 130 operating temples worldwide, with 8 under construction, and 13 more announced, along with one which is no longer owned by the Church. The Temple that took the longest to build was the Salt Lake Temple in Salt Lake City, Utah. Construction on this temple began on February 14, 1853 and was completed on April 6, 1893. It took just over 40 years to complete! Many of the smaller temples built between 1997 and 2001 took less than a year to build. Most temples take about 2 to 3 years to build. To see photos or more information about the Church's temples, please visit the "Related Links" below.
Asked in Mormonism, Mormon (LDS) Temples

How many lds temples in the us?

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73 of the Church's 152 operating or under construction temples are in the United States. These temples are located in: Birmingham, Alabama Anchorage Alaska Gila Valley, Gilbert, Mesa, Phoenix, and Snowflake Arizona Fresno, Los Angeles, Newport Beach, Oakland, Redlands, Sacramento, and San Diego California Denver Colorado Fort Lauderdale and Orlando Florida Atlanta Georgia Kona and Laie Hawaii Boise, Idaho Falls, Rexburg, and Twin Falls Idaho Chicago and Nauvoo Illinois Louisville Kentucky Baton Rouge Louisiana Washington D.C. Boston Massachusetts Detroit Michigan St. Paul Minnesota Kansas City and St. Louis Missouri Billings Montana Omaha Nebraska Las Vegas and Reno Nevada Albuquerque New Mexico Manhattan and Palmyra New York Raleigh North Carolina Bismarck North Dakota Columbus Ohio Oklahoma City Oklahoma Medford and Portland Oregon Philadelphia Pennsylvania Colmbia South Carolina Memphis and Nashville Tennessee Dallas, Houston, Lubbock, and San Antonio Texas Bountiful, Brigham City, Draper, Logan, Monticello, Manti, American Fork, Ogden, Provo, St. George, Salt Lake City, Vernal, Payson and South Jordan (2 temples) in Utah and Seattle, Spokane, and Richland Washington
Asked in Mormonism, Mormon (LDS) Temples

What is the Mormon practice of a husband giving his wife a new name to get into heaven?

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Many adult members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (commonly called the "Mormon" church) choose to participate in a sacred Temple ceremony called the "Endowment". The Endowment is seen as a sort of step beyond baptism, in which an individual demonstrates their commitment to Jesus Christ by making further covenants with God. As a part of this ceremony, each participant (married or single) is given a "new name" that is used as a sort of password to enter into the Celestial Room, symbolic of heaven. They are instructed that the new name should not be told to anyone except to one certain person who stands as a kind of gatekeeper into the room. The only exception is with a married woman, whose husband will stand in that place and receive her new name only once as a part of their 'sealing' (or marriage) ceremony. The husband does not give the wife the new name, and many Mormon women receive this name years before they are married, but the wife will tell her husband the new name when they are married or "sealed" in the temple. As the temple ceremonies are highly symbolic, and the interpretation is up to the individual and is not preached about or explained, the exact meaning and purpose of the new name is unknown. Some take it literally to mean that a husband will help his wife enter heaven through the use of her new name. However, most believe the name is symbolic, perhaps of the new or changed person one becomes when they devote their lives to God and the necessity to become such in order to enter heaven.
Asked in Mormonism, Mormon (LDS) Temples

What happens in a Mormon temple?

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Those ordinances or ceremonies that Mormons perform in their temples are: Baptisms for the Dead, Confirmations, Washings, Annointings, Endowment Ceremonies and Marriages or Family Sealings. Based on the Bible's John 3:5 which states: "Verily, verily, I say unto thee, Except a man be born of water and of the Spirit, he cannot enter into the kingdom of God. " 1 Corinthians 15:29 of the Bible speaks of baptisms for the dead in a manner implying they were also practised at the time of the Apostles. Baptisms for the Dead are performed for those who have died and not had the opportunity to be baptized (as a Mormon) in this lifetime. Any 'worthy' member 12 years or older can obtain a 'temple recommend' from his Bishop and perform these baptisms for the dead in a temple. Mormons are very dedicated to geneology and hope to baptize all people who have lived on this earth some day. Mormons believe that those who have passed on have a choice whether to accept this baptism into the church or not. When a man or woman are older (usually 19 for a male and 21 for a female) they are eligible to receive their 'Endowment' and 'Washing and Annointing'. These are highly sacred rituals where covenants (promises) are made to live a righteous life. Sealings are simply sealing of one person to another for 'time and all eternity'. Parents are sealed to each other when they first get married. Children are then classified as automatically sealed to their parents if they are born after the temple marriage occurs. Otherwise, any children must be sealed to parents as a separate ordinance - each and every child individually. All of these ordinances of exaltation ("eternal life") are performed in these holy temples for both, the living and the dead. Their essential portions have been the same in all dispensations when the fulness of the sealing power has been exercised by the Lord's prophets. Families are literally sealed for time and all eternity, this is how the Lord has so deemed it. In temples, the righteous are taught all they need to do to enter the gates of heaven. A ceremony may be a procedure (like a baptism) or it may be an experience in which you make promises (Covenants) to live God's commandments in exchange for different kinds of blessings... an example might be 'sealing' yourself to your spouse--you promise to live God's commandments and, in exchange, your marriage will not end 'until death do you part', but still exist in Heaven Forever. ** Just as a minor note: Mormons do not refer to the ordinances in the Temple as "secretive" but "sacred." They are not keeping these things secret. But rather, they do not give details about them in order to keep them sacred and holy. They only discuss the ordinances in detail while in the walls of the Temple.
Asked in Mormon (LDS) Temples

What are the telephone numbers for LDS Temple Prayer rolls in Utah?

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Dear Sister Lila, Thank you for the phone numbers. Below is the direct number to my local temples prayer line plus Mount Timpanogas, Utah. Los Angeles: 310-234-8150 Timpanogas: 801-763-4640 God Bless, Sister Nella McLaughlin Santa Susana 3rd Ward Simi Valley, CA
Asked in Mormonism, Mormon (LDS) Temples

Which LDS temples have the same design?

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To meet the needs of a growing and diverse membership, the Church has evolved its approach to temple construction and design over the years. This brief article examines the major design phases of latter-day temple construction.
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Why don't Mormons have crucifix es in their temples?

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we dont worship the cross. we worship christ and God
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Why can't a non practicing Mormon get married in the temple?

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The temple is on of the highest demonstrable levels of commitment in the church. You receive and learn things there that are not available anywhere else. The service done has very little tangible results as far as this life goes. One benefit is the marriage ceremony that unites a couple in a way unlike anything else on earth. There are certain minimum requirements to enter the temple and participate in the ordinances. I think that a more appropriate question might be "Why would anyone not living the standards want to commit themselves to the higher laws of the church?" If people aren't willing to live the lower laws, then it is pretty much assured that higher laws will be ignored, too. Why would anyone think that living a secular life should qualify them to receive extremely spiritual ordinances and commitments?