Mormonism

Questions about the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, commonly known as Mormonism.

Asked in Mormonism, Theater Musicals

How long is Broadway show book of Mormons?

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The Book of Mormon is religious musical satire that opened on Broadway in March of 2011 and is still running. The musical has 2 acts and lasts 2 hours and 30 minutes.
Asked in Mormonism, Missionaries

Do Mormons have missionaries?

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Yes. In fact, Mormons (members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints) are quite well known for their missionary force. At any given time, they have over 50,000 missionaries serving around the world. Most missionaries are young people ages 19 to 25 who take a break in their university studies to be missionaries for 2 years. Others are retired couples. The Church rarely asks or allows families with children at home to be missionaries. There are many different kinds of Mormon Missionaries, but most spend about 50-60 hours a week proselyting and 10-30 hours a week performing service in the local community. Others are strictly service missionaries and rarely do any proselyting. To serve as a Mormon Missionary, one must discuss with their bishop to see if they meet the qualifications to serve. They then submit an application to Church Headquarters in Salt Lake City, Utah. Top church officials review the applications and mail the prospective missionary a letter informing them of their mission assignment. The missionary has no choice in where they are sent, and the location could be almost anywhere, excepting a handful of communist nations, middle eastern nations, and antarctica. See the "Related Links" to learn more about Mormon Missionaries. Members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints are often called "Mormons" by those of other faiths. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints does have a worldwide missionary program. In 2010, there were 52,483 Latter-day Saint (or "Mormon") missionaries serving all over the world. Latter-day Saint missionaries serve voluntarily. Single men ages 19-25 and single women ages 21-30 may choose to serve, as well as older couples. Missionaries pay their own way for their missions. Young men typically serve for two years, young women for 18 months, and seniors may serve periods ranging from 6 months to 23 months. Missionaries may serve by knocking on doors to seek out interested parties or they may serve missions focusing more on humanitarian aid where the need is greatest around the world. Missionaries seek to spread the gospel of Jesus Christ and to follow the example He set in life by serving those around them. Talk with a Mormon Missionary at Mormon.org
Asked in Mormonism, Athletes

Is Blake griffin Mormon?

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No, he is a non-denominational Christian
Asked in Mormonism, Mormon (LDS) Temples

How many LDS temples are there in Brazil?

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There are currently (June 2015) seven temples of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Brazil. These are located in Manaus, Fortaleza, Recife, Campinas, Sao Paulo, Curitiba, and Porto Alegre. There is one temple being planned for Rio de Janeiro.
Asked in Gospel Music, Mormonism

What is the shortest hymn in the LDS hymn book?

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Probably #160, Softly Now the Light of Day. The music is only two lines and there is only one verse, which reads: "Softly now the light of day Fades upon my sight away. Free from care, from labor free, Lord, I would commune with thee." Or #242, Praise God from whom all blessings flow. I timed them based on the time signature and tempo and they are the exact same length. Lyrics are: "Praise God from whom all blessings flow, Praise him a creatures here below. Praise him above ye heavenly host, praise Father, Son and Holy Ghost." Hymn 136 Love One Another is also pretty short, although it's a bit longer than the other two it's still very short with the hymn stating As I have loved you, Love one another. This new commandment: Love one another. By this shall men know Ye are my disciples, If ye have love One to another.
Asked in Mormonism

Are Julianne and Derek Hough Mormon?

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Yes. Julianne and Derek Hough are members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (the "Mormon" church).
Asked in Mormonism, Celebrity Births Deaths and Ages

How old is Thomas S. Monson?

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Mormon leader Thomas S. Monson was 90 years old when he died on January 2, 2018 (birthdate: August 21, 1927).
Asked in Mormonism

Why don't Mormons in Utah eat salmon?

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Of course they do. Been there, done that, ate the whole thing. Salmon very popular in Utah. I'm a Mormon, I live in Utah, and I eat salmon! It's very popular here and very tasty! We have no rules or guidelines about eating fish. Another answer: Because Utah is a thousand miles from the ocean. If you want good salmon, visit Seattle, where the Mormons eat salmon every single day.
Asked in Religion & Spirituality, Mormonism

What is the difference between a CTR ring and a purity ring?

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'CTR' means 'choose the right'. A CTR ring reminds LDS (Latter-Day-Saint, Mormon) members to do what they know is right. A purity ring reminds the wearer to practice abstinence before marriage. LDS members don't use purity rings, we believe that we should not have sex before marriage, and that this is a commandment from God.
Asked in Mormonism, Missionaries

Who was the first Mormon missionary to Hawaii?

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The first Mormon Missionaries sent to Hawaii arrived in December 1850. There were ten missionaries. President Hiram Clark presided over the mission in Honolulu with Elder Thomas Morris as his assistant. Elders Henry Bigler, George Q. Cannon, and James Keeler were assigned to Lahaina on Maui. Elders William Farrer and John Dixon went to the island of Kaua'i, and Elders Hiram Blackwell and James Hawkins went to the Big Island of Hawaii. The first congregation was organized only a few months later, and a temple was completed on O'ahu in 1919. There is a great history of the first missionaries and converts in Hawai'i found at the "Related Link" below. The list of missionaries above isn't complete. The tenth missionary to be called to Hawaii was Thomas Levi Whittle. The trip from San Francisco to the Sandwich Islands lasted 20 days and their arrival at Honolulu at 12 Dec 1850 was heralded by natives attempting to sell fruits and other foodstuffs. . . . On 14 Dec 1850 President Hiram Clark called the missionaries to select partners. First he chose Thomas Whittle to stay with him and establish headquarters for the mission. The island of Molaki fell to Henry Bigler and Thomas Moore; Kawai fell to John Dixon and William Farrer; Hawaii fell to James Hawkin and Hiram Blackwell. Maui fell to George Q. Cannon and James Keeler. ("Treasures of Pioneer History," Vol. 4) There is a bronze plaque at the front entrance of the Hawaiian Temple with a picture of this group of missionaries, with names of all inscribed. Underneath is written: "The first missionaries to the islands." ("The Mormons in Hawaii Progress of the Mission, p. 136) This marker was dedicated at Honolulu August 14, 1950 (p. 470)
Asked in Mormonism

What does PTI mean in the Mormon church?

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In 23 years of being a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (the "Mormon" church) I have never heard of the term PTI. I couldn't find anything about it online either. My guess is that it could stand for something like Personal Temple Interview or Priesthood Training Interview? Another answer: Fifty three years here. And ditto. Another answer Born and raised a member and never heard of it. Are you sure you're not meaning or thinking of P-Day? This is what Missionaries get once a week, basically time off to do laundry, and personal tasks not related to their regular missionary duties.
Asked in Mormonism

Is Warren Buffet a Mormon?

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No. Warren Buffett is not a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (the "Mormon" church).
Asked in History of the United States, Utah, Mormonism, Oregon Trail, Mormon Trail

Why did Mormons take the Oregon Trail?

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The trail followed by Mormon pioneers mostly paralleled the Oregon Trail, at times merged with it, and at a few points diverged completely from it. The reason for following the general course of the Oregon trail was primarily because it had been mapped out by traders and trappers several years prior to their own exodus from Nauvoo, Ill. However, because of the adversarial relationship between the Mormons and many immigrants from both Illinois and Missouri (where an "extermination order" was still in effect at that time), the Mormon immigrants opted to follow a course that also followed the Platte river, but on the opposite side from most Oregon-bound parties.
Asked in Mormonism

Is Utah valley university a Mormon affiliated college?

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No. Utah Valley University is a public government funded univeristy that is not affiliated with the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (commonly called the "Mormon" Church). The only universities affiliated with the Church are Brigham Young University, BYU-Idaho, BYU-Hawaii, and LDS Business College. While Utah Valley University is a public school, it is located near BYU and many of it's students are members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The Church does operate an Institute of Religion near campus, which provides free religion classes, worship services, and weekend activities to all students, regardles of their religious affiliation.
Asked in Mormonism, Polygamy

When did Mormons quit polygamy?

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The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (commonly called the "Mormon" Church) discontinued the practice of polygamy nearly 120 years ago, in 1890. Anyone who entered into a polygamous relationship after this date was excommunicated. This practice of excommunication of polygamists continues today. To read the official declaration from Church President Wilford Woodruff which outlawed the practice of polygamy in the Church, please see the "Related Link" below. ---------- While the above answer is accurate, it leaves some interesting information out. When President Wilford Woodruff discontinued polygamy in 1890 a schism occurred within the Church. A small group of men felt they had been ordained by Woodruff's predecessor, John Taylor, to continue the practice of polygamy even if the main body of the Church did not. As a result they broke off from the Church and formed other congregations that are commonly referred to by the media with the common nickname, "Mormon." But in fact they have no connection to the LDS Church headquartered at Temple Square in Salt Lake City, Utah. Today, the remnants of those groups are found in the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (FLDS Church)--popular due to the recent Warren Jeff's trial in Texas--, the Apostolic United Brethren, and other Mormon fundamentalist groups. However, there were instances that families and individuals who remained with the larger body of the LDS Church continued to practice polygamy. Some members of the Quorum of the Twelve even continued to perform polygamous marriages. For that reason Joseph F. Smith, successor to Woodruff as President of the Church, issued the "Second Manifesto" in 1904. President Heber J. Grant followed up with the "third and fourth Manifestos" that were intended to reiterate the ideals taught in 1890 by President Woodruff. But to answer your question the official date of the end of polygamy within the LDS Church was October 6, 1890. Note: see Anne Wilde, "Fundamentalist Mormonism: Its History, Diversity and Stereotypes, 1886-Present," in Scattering of the Saints: Schism within Mormonism, edited by Newell G. Bringhurst and John C. Hammer (Independence, MO: John Whitmer Books, 2007), 260-63. The principal division of Mormonism, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (LDS), has never actually abandoned or repudiated the doctrine of plural marriage. The doctrine itself was not reversed, revoked or otherwise invalidated by the 1890 Manifesto of Wilford Woodruff, then-President and "Prophet" of the LDS church. In FACT, the doctrine and practice of plural marriage were only "SUSPENDED" by the LDS on the basis of a rationale that obliged members to obey civil law, the particular civil law being the law against polygamy. It thus follows that, should that law be rescinded, Mormons would once more become subject to the "new and everlasting covenant" of plural marriage prescribed by Joseph Smith, Jr. in the Doctrine & Covenants, chapter 132. Those questioning this are referred to an official publication of the LDS church, "Articles of Faith," by "Apostle" James E. Talmage, one of the most esteemed (at least by Mormons) of Mormon theologians. For many years, his book was a standard reference source carried by Mormon missionaries in their ubiquitous backpacks. The subtitle of the book is "Being a Consideration of the Principal Doctrines of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints" It is published by the LDS's own publishing house, Deseret Book Company. From page 384 of the 1984 edition: "An illustration of such suspension of divine law is found in the action of the church regarding the issue of plural marriage." A "suspension" is not a nullification or a reversal. The doctrine of plural marriage still stands; it has merely been "suspended." It would have been inexpedient to revoke the doctrine, seeing that the "Prophet" Joseph Smith, Jr. had boldly declared it to be a "new and everlasting covenant." Something fully abandoned after only a few decades could scarcely be said to be "everlasting." Faced with the need to get away from plural marriage and into statehood, the LDS circumvented the implications of the "everlasting" descriptor and adopted the expedient of "suspension." Should the courts of this nation ever hold that plural marriage is legally valid, the doctrine presumably would return in full force and effect and the LDS branch of Mormonism could than join their maverick cousins, the "Fundamentalist Mormons" in the practice of the "new and everlasting covenant."
Asked in Mormonism, Mormon Trail

Where did the Mormon Trail start?

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Nauvoo, Illlinois is the start of the Mormon Trail.
Asked in Mormonism

Why are Mormons afraid of magnets?

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They aren't. Another Answer You are thinking of the internet meme that's out there that is from the Insane Clown Posse and their song Miracles. Somehow this meme and song has twisted itself into a meme about Mormons and Magnets. However, Mormons have no fear about magnets or internet memes either.
Asked in Mormonism

Does the church own the LDS hospital?

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No. LDS hospital is owned and operated by Intermountain Health Care. It was originally owned by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints but was turned over to Intermountain in 1975. They kept the same name just for name recoginition and marketing purposes. The same is with Primary Childrens Medical Center, which began as the children's ward of LDS hospital and eventually grew into it's own facility.
Asked in Christianity, Mormonism

Are Mormons Christian?

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The answer to the question depends entirely upon your definition of "Christian." If you define Christians as those who believe in Jesus Christ, then yes, Mormons are Christians. Mormons believe in Jesus Christ as the only name under heaven given to man, whereby they can be saved. They believe their church to be a Restorationist Christian denomination. This means that they are not Catholic, Protestant, or Orthodox, but that Jesus Christ restored his church to the earth through the prophet Joseph Smith. They believe that Jesus Christ is the Son of God and the Savior and Redeemer of all mankind. They believe that He suffered and died so that we might be saved and return to live with God, the Father. Pictures of Christ adorn their church walls, prayers are said in the name of Christ, the communion or sacrament of the Lord's supper is performed nearly every week, and sermons and lessons often focus on the teachings of Jesus Christ. Also, the real name of the "Mormon" church is The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, so they definitely believe in Jesus Christ and see themselves as Christians. On the other hand, if you define "Christian" more narrowly, as is popular among many contemporary Evangelical Christians, as those who believe certain things about Christ then, no, Mormons are not traditional Christians. One of the doctrines which separate Mormons from traditional Christians is their complete rejection of the Trinity. Mormons believe that The Father and The Son (Jesus Christ) have separate, glorified bodies of flesh and bone. They believe them to be One in purpose, but not one God in terms of being the same entity. Another doctrine which separates Mormons from traditional Christians is the role of the Holy Bible. Mormons believe in the Bible as far as it is translated correctly. They also believe in other scriptures and in continuing revelation. Other Christians believe that the Holy Bible is the infallible Word of God, and that no other book can compare to it. Further examples: Authority: Catholics claim their authority from Peter. Protestants claim their authority from the Bible. Mormons claim their authority from heavenly manifestations restored proper priesthood authority. Heaven and Hell: Mormons believe that heaven is divided into three kingdoms of glory. Even the worst villains and criminals can qualify for the lowest degree of glory. Mormons believe there is a place of no glory reserved for those few souls who know and believe in Jesus Christ as their redeemer, but they hate Him anyway. See Doctrine and Covenants 76 for a much longer description of heaven and hell. Traditional Christians believe that heaven is for those who accept Jesus and hell is for everybody else. Atonement: Mormons believe there are two parts to the atonement: resurrection and exaltation. They believe that all men will be resurrected and live forever. The resurrection is a free gift to all mankind. However exaltation is only given to those who accept Christ and repent of their sins. The Fall of Man: Mormons believe that the fall of man was a necessary part of the Plan of Salvation. Mankind could not fulfill their purpose without the knowledge of good and evil; therefore, Adam and Eve had to eat of the fruit of the tree and become mortal. Grace v. Works: Mormons believe that they must accept Christ by being baptized and keeping the commandments. Catholics also believe in the necessity of ordinances and good works. Other Christians argue long and hard that God's "grace is sufficient" (1 Corinthians 12:9). This point of contention is much older than the Mormon faith. _____ Absolutely. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (the correct name for what is nicknamed The Mormon Church) teaches that Jesus Christ is our redeemer and savior, and that through faith in Him and obedience to His commandments, we can return to live in the presence of God after death. All the other teachings of the Church support that fundamental belief.
Asked in Mormonism

How can you get kicked out of the Mormon faith?

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There is no need to try to be kicked out of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (the "Mormon" church) because you can leave voluntarily. However, the church does follow the practice of excommunication and has guidelines in place for church discipline. The following actions could lead to a person being excommunicated from the Church: · Having any sexual relationship outside of a legal heterosexual marriage · Being convicted of a felony (or equivalent) charge · Performing physical, verbal, or sexual abuse · Open apostasy or public criticism of the Church and its leadership These actions aren't always grounds for excommunication, however. Local Church authorities faced with a situation analyze both the individual and the circumstances. Often, the individual will face a period of disfellowshipment (withheld the right to hold a position in the Church or to participate in Church ordinances) rather than be excommunicated entirely. Both excommunicated and disfellowshipped members are welcome and encouraged to participate in church services and activities, and may work with Church leaders to have their full membership in the Church re-instated. Answer Excommunication is the term used to describe what happens when a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (often misnamed the Mormon Church) is stripped of his or her membership and is no longer considered a member of the Church. There are a few things that could result in excommunication, such as becoming involved in activities which are antagonistic towards the Church, committal of serious sin, such as adultery, or practicing polygamy. Each case that could result in excommunication, however, is treated on an individual basis by the person's bishop. If the situation is serious enough to possibly result in excommunication, the matter will be taken up by a council and reviewed by a Church court. It is important to note that excommunication is a part of the repentance process and releases the individual from his or her covenants. This makes the consequences for their poor choices less severe, which should make the repentance process easier to bear. Any member who is excommunicated will be welcomed back with open arms once they have repented and taken the necessary steps to be forgiven of their sins. We are all sinners and are all dependent upon Jesus Christ to intercede on our behalf. All sinners are loved, but the sins themselves cannot be tolerated. Faithful members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints apply the healing and cleansing power of the atonement of Jesus Christ in their daily lives. More serious sins require a more intense healing process, and sometimes excommunication is a necessary part of that.
Asked in Mormonism, Polygamy

Why did the Mormons quit polygamy?

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God commanded through their leader at the time that they stop polygamy. This was timely, as the Federal Government was about to come down on them about this and other issues that contradicted the majority view of American society at the time. And timing is everything, because also reveled is that the prohibition of polygamy is only for a "time". The time will come when it will be allowed again, once either society progresses and catches up with the original teachings and revelations of J. Smith, or when the Mormons sufficiently dominate politics or social morals to do so. That would then fulfill the revealed prohibition on polygamy. Study LDS, their doctrines, and revelations.
Asked in Mormonism

What year did the Mormons start wearing garments?

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The Temple Garment, or Garment of the Holy Priesthood, was introduced as part of the washing, annointing, and endowment ceremony of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (the "Mormon" church) by 1842 (when the full endowment was introduced), but perhaps as early as 1836 (when the washing and annointing was first introduced).
Asked in Mormonism

When was Mormonism founded?

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The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (the "Mormon" church) was officially organized on April 6, 1830.
Asked in Mormonism, Safeway

Does a Mormon own Safeway Stores?

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No. Safeway Stores came from a merger between Skaggs Stores in Idaho and Seelig Stores in California. The founder of the Skaggs Stores, Samuel Milton Skaggs, was a Baptist minister. The founder of Seelig Stores, Samuel Seelig, was the son of Russian Jewish immigrants and there is no mention of him converting to become a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (commonly called the "Mormon" church). As he lived in California at a time when the majority of Mormons were in Utah, it is quite unlikely. Currently, Safeway is a publically traded company and is therefore owned by stockholders, not an individual. The Mormon Church does not have stock in Safeway. The current CEO, Steven Burd, is said to be a Born-Again Christian.
Asked in Mormonism, Tom Cruise, Celebrity Religious Preferences

Is Tom Cruise Mormon?

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No. Tom Cruise is well known to be a Scientologist.