Presidential Inaugurations

This category contains questions and answers about the history of Presidential Inaugurations, the Oath of Office, and the celebrations afterward.

2,358 Questions
History, Politics & Society
John F. Kennedy
Battle of Gettysburg
Presidential Inaugurations

What was John Kennedy's most famous line in his Inaugural Address?

Awesome Answer :DKennedy's speech was pretty long, but the one sentence that stood out is simply:

"My fellow Americans, ask not what your country can do for you: Ask what you can do for your country."

RIP Kennedy

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US Constitution
Presidential Inaugurations

What does inauguration mean?

Inauguration is when the new president puts his hand on the Bible, and swares to follow the laws and to be a good leader.

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History of the United States
Presidential Inaugurations

What is the step by step presidential election process from primaries to inauguration?

First, each party holds primary contests in each state. These elections may either be primaries (people vote by secret ballot) or caucuses (people meet in a public room and stand in a designated area to show their support for a candidate. there are a lot of unusual rules for caucuses). The results of these contests determine the allocation of delegates from that state. Some caucus states have regional delegates that then select the state-level delegates. These delegates are pledged to a particular candidate, and the Democratic party also has "superdelegates" who are high-ranking party leaders and elected officials, who can choose to support any candidate they want.

After the primary contests, the party then holds a convention, at which time the delegates vote until a presidential nominee (and vice presidential nominee) is determined. A candidate needs a majority of that party's delegates to be nominated. The Republicans have just over 2000 delegates and the Democrats have somewhere around 4500.

Once the nominee is chosen, he or she then campaigns against the other parties' nominees, and the winner is chosen by electoral vote on a Tuesday in November. The national election is held on the same day in every state, and each state is apportioned (by population) a certain number of "electoral college" members, who generally vote for whoever won the popular vote in their state. Each state and the District of Columbia has between 3 and 55 electors. Each elector then signs a "Certificate of Vote" and sends it to the sitting Vice President's office. About a month after the election, there's a special session of Congress and they declare the winner of the presidential election. Normally, one of the candidates concedes the night of or the day after the election, so declaring the winner is simply a formality.

Then, in January, the new president and vice president are sworn in and inaugurated.

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US Presidents
John F. Kennedy
Presidential Inaugurations

How did John F. Kennedy become President?

He was elected by a majority of the voters. He also beat the pants off Nixon in a debate. Then he averted war with Russia over Cuba in The Bay of Pigs incident. Then he made everyone pretty much equal with the Civil Rights Act and he only had 2 1/2 years to do it before he was assassinated. He also was a decorated WWII veteran. A TV show in the '60's made light of this and was called "PT 109" in honor of his boat. I was a small child in the early sixes and used to laugh at his humor. He once talked about cutting himself with a can opener earlier that day like he was just like us. Meanwhile he was dealing with some very serious problems, like the Russians.

Lyndon Baines Johnson (LBJ) took over the Presidency after his death. Most of the programs that Kennedy had proposed had not been put into law yet, and might have never been. It has been said that Johnson got legislation through "on the back of the dead President". One cannot argue that sentiment and sympathy were high in those days and Johnson had a lot of clout with the Senate. The most important Acts passed were the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and The Job Corps. These programs were dear to Kennedy's heart and without this man's death, it might have been a long time before we would see the progress in social reform that we enjoy today.annd talking to people to help him in his campain

414243
US Presidents
Thomas Jefferson
Presidential Inaugurations

When is the best describes the event leading to the inauguration of the first president of the US of America?

There was an election And George Washington got 100% of the votes as he was a well known war hero and the other man was relatively unknown

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Depo-Provera
Insurance
Presidential Inaugurations

How much does Depo-Provera cost?

The cost varies, but if you do not have insurance, the costs at most Planned Parenthoods is $35-$75 plus exam fees, and you need to get the shot every three months. In many areas, the local Health Department may give the shot for free if you do not have insurance.

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US Presidents
History of the United States
Presidential Inaugurations

Which US president said 'I promise' instead of 'I swear' at his inauguration?

Franklin Pierce was the only president to say "I promise" instead of "I swear" at his inauguration. Herbert Hoover also affirmed the oath, which is a constitutional alternative to swearing.

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US Presidents
Bill Clinton
Presidential Inaugurations

Who was the last president to have a surplus in the federal budget?

George W. Bush for the 2001 year. Had a surplus of over $142,000,000

Source is the related link.

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Law & Legal Issues
US Constitution
International Government
Presidential Inaugurations

What branch can veto or reject a law made by another branch?

the executive branch can veto law made by the legislative branch, but the law can still be passed by a two-thirds majority vote by both houses in the legislative branch.

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Republican Party
US Government
Presidential Inaugurations

Who is current foreign minister of America?

stiwert upten

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Presidential Inaugurations

Is inauguration date always January 20th?

Except for Washington's first inaugural, when he was sworn in on April 30, 1789, all presidents until 1937 were inaugurated in March in an effort to avoid bad weather. The 20th Amendment to the Constitution (passed in 1933) changed the inaugural date to January 20. Franklin Delano Roosevelt's Second Inauguration was the first to have been held on that date. The date of January 20th for the presidential inauguration was established by the 1933 ratification of the Twentieth Amendment, which changed the start date of the new presidential term from March 4th. The reason given was that due to the modern conveniences of better communications, the election results could be confirmed faster than in olden times. They did not want to make our Congress and president wait until almost the end of the first quarter of the year to begin their service.

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Presidential Inaugurations

Which mid-19th century president gave the longest inauguration speech of any president?

lincoln

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US Presidents
Presidential Inaugurations
White House

Is there is resolute desk in the oval office?

Yes, there is a Resolute Desk in the Oval Office. It came from the timbers of the British ship HMS RESOLUTE, abandoned in the Arctic in the 1850's, salvaged, and returned to Britain by the US Congress. Queen Victoria sent the desk to President Hayes as a token of friendship and this started the Special Relationship between the USA and Britain. A good book that covers the story is "HMS Resolute" by Elizabeth Matthews.

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Investing and Financial Markets
Bill Clinton
Stock Market
Presidential Inaugurations
Dow Jones Industrial Average

What was the Dow Jones average at Bill Clinton's first Inaugaration?

djindexes.com/mdsidx/downloads/xlspages/DJIA_Hist_Perf.xls

shows the DJIA low of 1993 was on Inauguration Day, Jan 20, closing at 3,241.95.

Yahoo Finance shows the DJIA opened on Clinton's Inauguration Day at 3255.99.

In addition to a budget surplus, William Jefferson Clinton left George Walker Bush with a DJIA of 10,587.59. That's a return of 226% or 15.9% annually.

Clinton continues to get 0 credit from the media and the Republicans and the public in general for these fine achievements. In fact the Democrats lost the House, including Speaker of the House Tom Foley as a thank you for their act in 1993 which led to the balanced budget, which kept interest rates low throughout the 1990s, enabling this bull run.

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US Presidents
Barack Obama
Presidential Inaugurations

Who swears the president into office?

Usually the Chief Justice, but any person with the legal power to administer oaths may do so. Calvin Coolidge, visiting his parents in Vermont when President Harding died, was sworn in by his father, a local Justice of the Peace. Only seven other times in US history has the oath of office been administered by someone besides the Chief Justice of the US.

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US Constitution
September 11 Attacks
Presidential Inaugurations

How many republican presidents served more than one term in office?

The Republican Presidents that completed two terms in office were:

Ulysses S. Grant, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Ronald Reagan and George W. Bush.

Abraham Lincoln , William McKinley and Richard Nixon was elected to two terms but did not complete their second terms.

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Waste and Recycling
Presidential Inaugurations
Population

How many people litter in the US?

This question is impossible to answer because there are the bold and the sneaky. Some people will litter right out in the open, while others are more sneaky about it so there are no stats. If your streets are highly littered then you live in a city of pigs! Many countries have the same problem, but there are some countries that are extremely strict about littering and a hefty fine is given.

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US Presidents
Presidential Inaugurations

Which presidents did not attend their successor's inauguration?

John Adams

John Quincy Adams

Andrew Johnson

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History of the United States
US Presidents
Presidential Inaugurations

Who was the first president to have his inauguration broadcast live on the Internet?

Bill Clinton was the first President to have his Inauguration live on the internet.

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Presidential Inaugurations
Flags

In what year was the 50 star added to the US flag?

1959 was the year that the 50th state, Alaska, was added.

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US Presidents
Presidential Inaugurations

Which two presidents died within a year of their inauguration?

William Henry Harrison died within one month after inauguration. Garfield died within 8 months of inauguration.

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US Presidents
Political Office Holders
Presidential Inaugurations

What is a sitting president?

One that does absolutely nothing

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US Presidents
Elections and Voting
Presidential Inaugurations

Steps to a presidential election?

The first step of the presidential election campaign is the announcement of the candidate proclaiming that s/he is going to run for president. In the summer of every presidential election year, political parties in the United States typically conduct national conventions to choose their presidential candidates. At the conventions, the presidential candidates are selected by groups of delegates from each state. After a series of speeches and demonstrations in support of each candidate, the delegates begin to vote, state-by-state, for the candidate of their choice. The first candidate to receive a preset majority number of delegate votes becomes the party's presidential candidate. The candidate selected to run for president then selects a vice presidential candidate. Delegates to the national conventions are selected at the state level, according to rules and formulas determined by each political party's state committee. While these rules and formulas can change from state-to-state and from year-to-year, there remain two methods by which the states choose their delegates to the national conventions: the caucus and the primary.In states holding them, presidential primary elections are open to all registered voters. Just like in general elections, voting is done through a secret ballot. Voters may choose from among all registered candidates and write ins are counted. There are two types of primaries, closed and open. In a closed primary, voters may vote only in the primary of the political party in which they registered. For example, a voter who registered as a Republican can only vote in the Republican primary. In an open primary, registered voters can vote in the primary of either party, but are allowed to vote in only one primary. Most states hold closed primaries.

Primary elections also vary in what names appear on their ballots. Most states hold presidential preference primaries, in which the actual presidential candidates' names appear on the ballot. In other states, only the names of convention delegates appear on the ballot. Delegates may state their support for a candidate or declare themselves to be uncommitted. In some states, delegates are bound, or "pledged" to vote for the primary winner in voting at the national convention. In other states some or all delegates are "unpledged," and free to vote for any candidate they wish at the convention.

Caucuses are simply meetings, open to all registered voters of the party, at which delegates to the party's national convention are selected. When the caucus begins, the voters in attendance divide themselves into groups according to the candidate they support. The undecided voters congregate into their own group and prepare to be "courted" by supporters of other candidates. Voters in each group are then invited to give speeches supporting their candidate and trying to persuade others to join their group. At the end of the caucus, party organizers count the voters in each candidate's group and calculate how many delegates to the county convention each candidate has won. As in the primaries, the caucus process can produce both pledged and unpledged convention delegates, depending on the party rules of the various states.

The Democratic and Republican parties use different methods for determining how many delegates are awarded to, or "pledged" to vote for the various candidates at their national conventions. Democrats use a proportional method. Each candidate is awarded a number of delegates in proportion to their support in the state caucuses or the number of primary votes they won. For example, consider a state with 20 delegates at a democratic convention with three candidates. If candidate "A" received 70% of all caucus and primary votes, candidate "B" 20% and candidate "C" 10%, candidate "A" would get 14 delegates, candidate "B" would get 4 delegates and candidate "C" would get 2 delegates. In the Republican Party, each state chooses either the proportional method or a "winner-take-all" method of awarding delegates. Under the winner-take-all method, the candidate getting the most votes from a state's caucus or primary, gets all of that state's delegates at the national convention. The first step of the presidential election campaign is the announcement of the candidate proclaiming that s/he is going to run for president. In the summer of every presidential election year, political parties in the United States typically conduct national conventions to choose their presidential candidates. At the conventions, the presidential candidates are selected by groups of delegates from each state. After a series of speeches and demonstrations in support of each candidate, the delegates begin to vote, state-by-state, for the candidate of their choice. The first candidate to receive a preset majority number of delegate votes becomes the party's presidential candidate. The candidate selected to run for president then selects a vice presidential candidate. Delegates to the national conventions are selected at the state level, according to rules and formulas determined by each political party's state committee. While these rules and formulas can change from state-to-state and from year-to-year, there remain two methods by which the states choose their delegates to the national conventions: the caucus and the primary.In states holding them, presidential primary elections are open to all registered voters. Just like in general elections, voting is done through a secret ballot. Voters may choose from among all registered candidates and write ins are counted. There are two types of primaries, closed and open. In a closed primary, voters may vote only in the primary of the political party in which they registered. For example, a voter who registered as a Republican can only vote in the Republican primary. In an open primary, registered voters can vote in the primary of either party, but are allowed to vote in only one primary. Most states hold closed primaries.

Primary elections also vary in what names appear on their ballots. Most states hold presidential preference primaries, in which the actual presidential candidates' names appear on the ballot. In other states, only the names of convention delegates appear on the ballot. Delegates may state their support for a candidate or declare themselves to be uncommitted. In some states, delegates are bound, or "pledged" to vote for the primary winner in voting at the national convention. In other states some or all delegates are "unpledged," and free to vote for any candidate they wish at the convention.

Caucuses are simply meetings, open to all registered voters of the party, at which delegates to the party's national convention are selected. When the caucus begins, the voters in attendance divide themselves into groups according to the candidate they support. The undecided voters congregate into their own group and prepare to be "courted" by supporters of other candidates. Voters in each group are then invited to give speeches supporting their candidate and trying to persuade others to join their group. At the end of the caucus, party organizers count the voters in each candidate's group and calculate how many delegates to the county convention each candidate has won. As in the primaries, the caucus process can produce both pledged and unpledged convention delegates, depending on the party rules of the various states.

The Democratic and Republican parties use different methods for determining how many delegates are awarded to, or "pledged" to vote for the various candidates at their national conventions. Democrats use a proportional method. Each candidate is awarded a number of delegates in proportion to their support in the state caucuses or the number of primary votes they won. For example, consider a state with 20 delegates at a democratic convention with three candidates. If candidate "A" received 70% of all caucus and primary votes, candidate "B" 20% and candidate "C" 10%, candidate "A" would get 14 delegates, candidate "B" would get 4 delegates and candidate "C" would get 2 delegates. In the Republican Party, each state chooses either the proportional method or a "winner-take-all" method of awarding delegates. Under the winner-take-all method, the candidate getting the most votes from a state's caucus or primary, gets all of that state's delegates at the national convention. The first step of the presidential election campaign is the announcement of the candidate proclaiming that s/he is going to run for president. In the summer of every presidential election year, political parties in the United States typically conduct national conventions to choose their presidential candidates. At the conventions, the presidential candidates are selected by groups of delegates from each state. After a series of speeches and demonstrations in support of each candidate, the delegates begin to vote, state-by-state, for the candidate of their choice. The first candidate to receive a preset majority number of delegate votes becomes the party's presidential candidate. The candidate selected to run for president then selects a vice presidential candidate. Delegates to the national conventions are selected at the state level, according to rules and formulas determined by each political party's state committee. While these rules and formulas can change from state-to-state and from year-to-year, there remain two methods by which the states choose their delegates to the national conventions: the caucus and the primary.In states holding them, presidential primary elections are open to all registered voters. Just like in general elections, voting is done through a secret ballot. Voters may choose from among all registered candidates and write ins are counted. There are two types of primaries, closed and open. In a closed primary, voters may vote only in the primary of the political party in which they registered. For example, a voter who registered as a Republican can only vote in the Republican primary. In an open primary, registered voters can vote in the primary of either party, but are allowed to vote in only one primary. Most states hold closed primaries.

Primary elections also vary in what names appear on their ballots. Most states hold presidential preference primaries, in which the actual presidential candidates' names appear on the ballot. In other states, only the names of convention delegates appear on the ballot. Delegates may state their support for a candidate or declare themselves to be uncommitted. In some states, delegates are bound, or "pledged" to vote for the primary winner in voting at the national convention. In other states some or all delegates are "unpledged," and free to vote for any candidate they wish at the convention.

Caucuses are simply meetings, open to all registered voters of the party, at which delegates to the party's national convention are selected. When the caucus begins, the voters in attendance divide themselves into groups according to the candidate they support. The undecided voters congregate into their own group and prepare to be "courted" by supporters of other candidates. Voters in each group are then invited to give speeches supporting their candidate and trying to persuade others to join their group. At the end of the caucus, party organizers count the voters in each candidate's group and calculate how many delegates to the county convention each candidate has won. As in the primaries, the caucus process can produce both pledged and unpledged convention delegates, depending on the party rules of the various states.

The Democratic and Republican parties use different methods for determining how many delegates are awarded to, or "pledged" to vote for the various candidates at their national conventions. Democrats use a proportional method. Each candidate is awarded a number of delegates in proportion to their support in the state caucuses or the number of primary votes they won. For example, consider a state with 20 delegates at a democratic convention with three candidates. If candidate "A" received 70% of all caucus and primary votes, candidate "B" 20% and candidate "C" 10%, candidate "A" would get 14 delegates, candidate "B" would get 4 delegates and candidate "C" would get 2 delegates. In the Republican Party, each state chooses either the proportional method or a "winner-take-all" method of awarding delegates. Under the winner-take-all method, the candidate getting the most votes from a state's caucus or primary, gets all of that state's delegates at the national convention.

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History of the United States
US Presidents
George Washington
Presidential Inaugurations

What are the names of all the US Presidents before George Washington?

George Washington was the first President of the United States. But there were "Presidents of Congress" both before and after the Articles of Confederation. These 14 men were "presiding officers", not chief executives of the country (Washington was the first).

Presidents of Congress (September 5, 1774 - November 5, 1781)

1. Peyton Randolph (twice)

2. Henry Middleton

3. John Hancock (see below)

4. Henry Laurens

5. John Jay

6. Samuel Huntington

7. Thomas McKean

Presidents under the Articles of Confederation ( November 5, 1781 - November 15, 1788)

1. John Hanson

2. Elias Boudinot

3. Thomas Mifflin

4. Richard Henry Lee

5. John Hancock

6. Nathaniel Gorham

7. Arthur St. Clair

8. Cyrus Griffin

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Politics and Government
Presidential Inaugurations

Who was the first president to be inaugurated on January 20?

The first President to be inaugurated on January 20th was Franklin D. Roosevelt, in 1937. Previously, the Presidential inauguration date had been March 4. This was changed by the passage of the 20th Amendment, ratified on January 23, 1933.

The 32nd President, FDR was both the first inaugurated on January 20 (his second of four terms) and the last inaugurated on March 4 (his first term in 1933).

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