Asked in
World War 2
Australia in WW2
Britain in WW2

What was Australia's relationship with Britain during World War 2?

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March 27, 2013 3:58PM

Australia looked upto Britain because it was their mother country but when the British ships were sunk in Malaya and Singapore and Britain fell to japan, Britain was seen not as strong after being defeated and australians felt that they could no longer rely on Britain but instead joined allies with America and kept links with Britain.... Hope that helps u ppl who need the answer. I did my best 2 answer it.

Answer

Australia's relationship with Britain in WW2 decreased when Curtin (Australia's prime minister at the time) wanted to bring back the troops in New Guinea, who where working for Britain to stop the Jampanese back to the Australian Homefront. Churchill wanted the troops sent to Burma instead.

Curtin won and the troops returned home to Australia, but then sent up to New Guinea (at the time controlled by Australia) where they battled with the Japanese. I'm not sure if this is where the fighting of the Kokoda trail happened...

but anyway..the relationship altered and Australia turned to America to find some help with backing up the troops, but Roosevelt (USA prime minister) sided with Churchill, and Australia was left to fend themselves....

Answer

Australia received it's independence in 1901 but still recognizes the British Monarch. Prior to Dec 1941 the Australia army was in Africa and the Middle East fighting with the British. After the Japanese dramatic advances in 1942 the Australian PM pulled the troops home. Churchill was very upset about this. The Australians had real expectations of invasion buy the Japanese.

Answer

Australia had depended on England, a world power, for protection. However, World War I weakened Britain's navy to the point where Australia was not sure England to protect her. With Japan investing most of its money in its military and invading China and Indonesia, Australia became more nervous and allied itself more strongly with the United States. The historian Paul Johnson said, it was like a divorce and a re-marriage.

Answer

I answered the question earlier and wrote that Japan had invaded Indonesia, but I should have written Indochina, which I believe is now Vietnam.

Answer

Some of the above answers give an unnecessarily melodramatic twist to something simple. After Pearl Harbor and the fall of Singapore, Australia ordered most of its troops back home from North Africa in order to defend Australia if the need arose. They also strengthened their links with the U.S. Just common sense, given that Britain was too far away to provide effective protection. Obviously, Britain wasn't too pleased.

Joncey

To the best of my knowledge, i see Australia to have been a distraction for the British. When the Australians landed at ANZAC cove, the British went over to the other side of the island and boiled the billy for a cup of tea. meanwhile the Australians were being defeated by the Turks. I feel that the relationship between the British and the Australians was friendly to the face, but backstabbers. I also feel that the British used the Australians to protect their own men.