Chronic Pain Drugs

Medications or drugs used to relieve chronic pains may be orally administered, injected or applied directly to the skin. Some drugs for chronic pains include acetaminophens, ibuprofens, corticosteroids, opioid analgesics, anesthetic, and steroidal injections.

197 Questions
Chronic Pain Drugs
Arm and Leg Pain
Aleve (Naproxen)

What is the maximum daily dosage of Aleve?

"Aleve" (® Bayer Healthcare) is an over-the-counter (OTC) brand of the drug Naproxen Sodium and is classified as a "Non-Steroidal,Anti-Inflammatory Drug" or NSAID. According to the manufacturer's recommendations, the minimum and maximum oral dosages are as follows... For Adults, the minimum is 275.0 mg, maximum is 1650.0 mg, Pediatric Dosages are, minimum 5.0 mg/kg, maximum = 21.0 mg/kg The safety and efficacy of this drug has not been established in children 2 years or younger. The dosage for adults assumes this maximum will not be exceeded within 24 hours of the maximum dosage. Generally, this means that adults should not take more than three capsules total within 24 hours of the first dose. Exceeding the maximum dosage recommendation carries with it significant risk of dangerous and debilitating side effects. Persons with allergies to this drug or aspirin should avoid taking Aleve. More information is available from the manufacturer's website at http://www.aleve.com, or you can Internet search for "Aleve" and "Naproxen Sodium"

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Hydrocodone
Acute & Breakthrough Pain Drugs
Chronic Pain Drugs

What is a common dosage of hydrocodene?

5-10 mg hydrocodone narcotic, 325-500 mg tylenol.

596061
Medication and Drugs
Hydrocodone
Oxycodone
Painkillers
Chronic Pain Drugs

Can you inject oxycodone 10mg?

oxycodone in all forms that I am aware that they are in usually have a filler such as tylenol and injecting the actual oxycodone itself would be very difficult seeing that you would have to get around the filler first. Otherwise it would be a whole lot of water/un-needed filler in a huge shot and it still wouldn't give you very much of a high after that process!

555657
Drug Tests
Demerol
Chronic Pain Drugs

How long does Demerol stay in your system?

3-5 days depending on dosage and legnth of use.

474849
Medication and Drugs
Painkillers
Chronic Pain Drugs
Fentanyl
Duragesic Patches

Should you be doing strenuous work with the Fentanyl patch?

It depends on your overall condition, reason for pain, your overall tolerance level, and the length of time you've been using Fentanyl Transdermal patches of any type. However, in general, if you're up to the task, then yes, it's okay, as long as you're aware of the potential risks involved.

Fentanyl patches (either Duragesic or its generic alternatives) work by slowly releasing the drug through a transdermal membrane into the bloodstream via the skin layer. The dosage delivery is controlled by body heat, and naturally any strenuous physical activity will increase your heart rate and elevate your core body temperature. This alone increases the dosage delivery rate, and if you're not yet that tolerant to the drug or opiates in general (rare since the patches are only supposed to be prescribed to prior opiate tolerant patients), then confusion or other increased side effects can occur.

As a long time Duragesic user and chronic pain patient on opiate therapy for many years (see my bio for specifics), I've experienced this several times while doing outside work or remodeling around my home. Even though I knew what was happening, the confusion level is so much that it's difficult to get out of the situation on your own. I describe it as being stuck in a loop you can't get yourself out of. Only removing the patch (if you do it properly you can re-attach it later - see my answer on that) or cooling your body to normal will alleviate the problem. It's also important to understand that opiates are Vasodilators, meaning they open the blood vessels (that's why you feel cold when the dosage tapers off - they start constricting). Opening the blood vessels wider naturally warms your body, but again if you're tolerant to the constant dosage over time then your body is already used to it.

However, if you take simple precautions to keep yourself from getting overheated (stay hydrated and cool while working) and your overall physical condition doesn't limit you from the work (e.g., you're dealing with extreme pain but are physically able to work), and you're prepared for what can happen (my family knows what to do if they find me in such a situation, and I always have my cell with me when working) then there isn't much you can't normally do that you didn't do before.

As you become more tolerant, the depressant effects will become less. I found years ago that a cerebral stimulant will help overcome the depressant effects to the point where I feel relatively normal. Of course I don't use them often, only when I'm using higher opiate dosages to control pain.

As far as driving, it's an individual situation. Not everyone handles opiate therapy the same way, and again only tolerant individuals can deal with the depressant side effects over time. I've never had any driving restrictions, though I've always been acutely aware that in any accident it would likely be an issue. Having said that, unless I told you that I was a high level opiate patient you'd never know as I feel normal most of the time. It's really a topic for your pain specialist and yourself, but if you've already got handicap driver plates or a placard, then your doctor has already signed off on the fact that he/she believes that you're okay to drive. How responsible you are is totally up to you. I won't drive if I need to increase my normal dosages to deal with increased pain.

You should also be aware of the fact that the patches will and do slow your reaction time, so you need to be more aware of safety factors and compensate for your slower reaction than normal when working. Also, remember that opiates work by altering the brain's perception of pain, and if you over-exert yourself, you could further aggravate your condition without realizing it until the pain becomes worse. Be smart.

If you're wondering, at my highest dosages I was using 2 100mcg Duragesic patches for primary pain, Percocet 10/325's for breakthrough (120/150 per month), 100mg Demerol tabs, and 30mg MS Contin tabs for pain. My normal dosages are 1 100mcg patch and the same amount of Percocet monthly. Those have been my normal dosages for about 9 years.

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Pain
Chronic Pain Drugs

Extreme spinal stenosis pain relief without addictions?

It is a widespread myth (and the reason that millions suffer and go untreated for pain) that a large percentage of true pain sufferers can get addicted, and that's just not true. You can and will likely get Dependent, but Dependence and Addiction are two very different problems.

Addiction is fueled by a psychological need for the drug to escape mental or social pressures - depression, being broke, criminal activity, etc. The list is endless. The difference is the psychological need - patients who are dependent on opiates use them for a valid medical reason that has real physical manifestations. Addicts use opiates to escape their own personal reality, and they're constantly going through highs and lows, while opiate patients are receiving maintenance levels that control their pain.

As a long-term chronic pain patient with over 15 years of dependence myself (you can read my supervisor bio for more detail), as well as a person who has dealt with relatives who have suffered from addiction, I can say with perspective that there is no comparison. Yes, I deal with withdrawal symptoms if I go too long without changing a patch or taking breakthrough meds, but I don't crave it, and I've been able to . I've never felt the need for any drug other than to ease pain, and there are many times I'll use OTC meds rather than breakthrough opiates.

Addiction in opiate patients is less than 1% or 2% if memory serves me right. Research has found over the years that patients who take their meds on schedule rather than wait until the pain is bad enough to warrant taking it, actually use less over time. It took a long time for me to get out of that old habit of waiting until the pain was too bad, but since I've changed I agree with the studies - I use less than I used to years ago before entering formal pain management.

It should be noted that opiate therapy via pain management is not a decision to be taken lightly - it should only be considered if there are no other therapy options that work. It is a Quality of Life decision - once you commit, you can of course stop, but unless you're able to effectively deal with the root cause of the pain, you're back where you started.

There's also the legal aspects, as well as the mental and physical aspects of opiate therapy over the long term. Legally, pain patients are required to sign a contract with their doctor stating that they won't "doctor shop" and only use one pharmacy. Patients who are in real pain don't have an issue with that, and anyone who does doesn't need opiate therapy to begin with. If you're prescribed Schedule 2 opiates (Percocet, Duragesic, OxyContin, Morphine, etc.) then you'll have to see your doctor every month to get new prescriptions - they cannot have refills, and they can't be called in. They can mail them to you, but I like them in my hand.

Physically, opiates cause mood swings and have various other side effects. It's the mood swings that typically alienate friends and family members who aren't educated prior to the patient starting therapy and are thus unprepared for the sudden change in mood. However, having said that, extreme pain 24/7/365 will do the same thing, so it's a 2 way street.

People who aren't knowledgeable about opiate therapy often wonder about being high all the time, and the plain truth is that it just doesn't happen. You might experience it at the outset, but your body becomes tolerant when the drug is in your system all the time. Over the years I've required pretty high doses of opiates, but aside from the pain control, it's like taking aspirin. I WISH I could get a buzz from drinking wine or Jack Daniels, but not to be. Bottom line is that once your body becomes tolerant, aside from the withdrawal tugs if you go too long past your dosage time, you won't really notice any difference other than the pain being relieved. I pretty much have a reasonably normal life - I can drive, work outside, do things I've been able to do for most of my life. The only thing I can't do is go back to my old job, but that's due to the nature of what I used to do.

The attitude in medicine toward opiate therapy has come a long way in the past 10 years, but I still see doctors using the word addiction in place of dependence, and for people like me it's extremely irritating. It does nothing to promote the use of opiates for patients who are in extreme pain and suffering, and there are many who don't come forward for needless fears of becoming addicted.

If you're wondering if it's possible to break dependence after using high levels of opiates, it is. It ain't fun, but it's not as bad as the daily pain. 3 years ago I had another disk collapse at L3/4 (I have Spondylolisthesis, besides stenosis problems and other spinal degeneration issues), and had to increase my opiate levels to the point where I was no longer getting any increased relief, only more side effects. Some of us call it a "ceiling" that you can reach. At that point I was using 2 100mcg Duragesic patches, 100mg Demerol tabs, 30mg MS Contin (morphine timed-release tabs), in addition to my normal breakthrough prescription of Percocet 10/325's. Earlier this year, I'd recovered enough to the point where I spent most of the year lowering my dependence level (incremental dosage lowering), to the point where I was able to stop using anything for a couple of weeks. I did it to assess my true current pain state (which unfortunately isn't as good as I'd hoped), but my point is that I was able to do it using methods I've used for years. It was only the last week of withdrawals that I needed some anti-nausea meds, but other than that it wasn't anything I hadn't experienced before, and I knew what to expect before I started and prepared for it. I've since had to start reusing opiates, and I resigned myself to the possibility that I'd likely be an opiate patient for the rest of my life. But the alternative for me, like many others, is constant agony, and that'll kill your spirit long before your body fails. Again, it's a quality of life decision.

Mental focus and even meditation shouldn't be discounted for therapy either - believe it or not, gaming is a sanctioned form of therapy for me, and is gaining acceptance in pain circles more recently. It doesn't really matter what activity it is, as long as your mind is focused on something other than the pain. Essentially, you're doing mentally what opiates do chemically, which is alter the brain's perception of the pain. If you're not thinking about it, it's not as bad. It's also how I got to be a WA Supervisor - answering questions keeps the mind focused and off the pain.

I had additional training as well, having trained in and taught Karate for several years before I became too ill. The mental focus I learned, as well as the ability to increase my pain tolerance, helped me significantly when the pain became constant and extreme. I do have a meditation routine that I use and used to teach that I still give to people - if you're interested (or anyone else) feel free to email me at my WA email on my Supervisor bio page at the top.

Only you can really assess your pain level, as all pain is individual and subjective to you alone. What may be nothing to me might be excruciating for you or someone else. But it doesn't mean that you're not suffering or don't require help. If you've exhausted other therapies (that are usually temporary at best) then opiate therapy might be an alternative. Remember too the psychological effect that pain has on us - when it hurts, we don't want to be active. But the body needs to be active to release endorphins to help with the pain. That'll only get you so far though - in reality, if you have physical damage or degeneration to the point where surgery is the only option left (which should only be considered when paralysis or loss of mobility is a factor), or nothing else works for more than a few days, then opiates should be considered, but again, not lightly.

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Medication and Drugs
Oxycodone
Painkillers
Chronic Pain Drugs
Fentanyl
OxyContin
Pain Management
Duragesic Patches

Are Oxycontin and Fentanyl patches safe to take at the same time?

You can, but they are typically not prescribed together since they perform the same function - long term dosage delivery of opiate for chronic pain. They can be prescribed together when the patient is making the transition from OxyContin to Duragesic or vice-versa, but there's really no reason for it. All Duragesic patches come with information instructing the patient and doctor on the minimum starting dosage with a morphine equivalence chart that allows them to estimate your current equivalence with the drug you're using to the equivalent Duragesic dosage. Janssen Pharmaceuticals does skew the dosage estimates lower than they normally should be though for safety reasons, since all patients should start at the lowest dose and then work up to maintenance levels.

The difference is in the time factor - OxyContin has an advertised dosage time of 12 hours effective dosage, while Fentanyl patches are good for either 48 to 72 hours depending on the individual. For most people it's 72 hours, but a small percentage of the population (myself included) only gets 48 hours.

Since they're both controlled delivery drugs, Fentanyl patches are often prescribed when OxyContin tolerance has lowered to the point where the patient is only getting relief for about the same time that an acute pain medication does - just over 6 hours. Before I started using Duragesic, I was barely getting 7 hours out of OxyContin. The idea in pain management is to maintain a controlled dosage with less medication at a steady rate over long periods so that the patient doesn't have to rely on more medication to achieve the same results. Of course as tolerance increases, dosages may have to be adjusted, or increased if the pain increases. I've had to do this several times over the many years I've used Duragesic, but ultimately was able to return to my normal dosage levels after the reason for increased need was dealt with.

the fentanyl patch is a long timed system patch in which it lasts up to 72 hours per patch and dosage in your system compared to the tablet of Oxycontin in which it only lasts about 6-8 hours per pill depending on dose and your tolerance of pain medications

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Health
Medication and Drugs
Drug Addiction
Chronic Pain Drugs
Pain Management

What is the drug called Roxinol liquid?

Roxinol Oral Suspension® (liquid) is a brand name of morphine sulphate, a powerful narcotic used to treat moderate to severe pain. Morphine is an opiate-class drug, the strongest painkiller used in medicine, available by prescription only, and a tightly regulated, schedule C narcotic.

The liquid form of morphine is fast-acting, and presents a serious health risk to anyone who is not already morphine-tolerant. It works by blocking pain receptors in the brain, but may also cause low blood pressure, slowed breathing, nausea or vomiting, drowsiness, and constipation.

Signs of overdose include stupor, pain insensitivity, deep, coma-like sleep, dizziness, light-headedness, sweating, nausea, vomiting, and slowed or shallow breathing. Anyone experiencing these symptoms needs emergency medicalassistance.

Morphine is a drug of abuse and is highly addictive, particularly when used recreationally. Even patients who are closely monitored by a physician will develop tolerance and dependence over time, and may occasionally need to have their dose titrated upward to receive maximum relief.

Morphine should never be stopped abruptly, except under the direct supervision of a doctor. Under most circumstances, discontinuation is done gradually, with the dose being slowly decreased to avoid the flu-like symptoms of withdrawal.

This answer is for educational purposes only, and is not intended as medical advice.

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Health
Medication and Drugs
Pain
Chronic Pain Drugs

What is the best non prescription pain medication?

Tramadol is the best non prescription pain medication.

Soma is also good but it is not allowed in some states.

Both of the above are not available in some countries so, paracetamol is ok too. (In the US, paracetamol is called acetaminophen, or Tylenol.)

Also available over the counter in the US is naproxen, an NSAID sold under many brand names including Aleve and Midol.

313233
Medication and Drugs
Painkillers
Chronic Pain Drugs
Fentanyl
Pain Management
Duragesic Patches

How can you keep Duragesic Fentanyl Transdermal Patches from falling off when sweating?

This has always been a problem for Duragesic users like myself, particularly during the Summer months. However, there are several ways you can help keep your patch(es) in place:

1. If you're using Duragesic and not the generic patches (most people like me who've used Duragesic for years can't use them), Janssen Pharmaceuticals, the maker of the patch, has a program for users of their patch to deal with the problem. Qualified individuals are sent a package of Bioclusive cover bandages to place over the existing patch. Bioclusives are transparent bandages that work like any other, but are just transparent and have different properties. The Bioclusive is large enough to fit over a single 100mcg patch and hold it in place. The information is in the Duragesic box, or you can call them directly at the number on the back of the box. The Bioclusive program is one of the menu items. Note that it is ONLY for Duragesic users; if you're using the generic patch, you're not qualified for the program.

2. Skin Prep - Skin Prep is a medical adhesive skin preparation, normally used by Colostomy patients who have much greater adhesive/adhesion requirements. Skin Prep preps the skin by adding a thin layer of a chemical that increases the adhesion of whatever it's stuck to. The key to using this though is that you must be absolutely precise in its application where the adhesive edges of the patch are to go. If careless, you can block the skin area where the patch membrane is when you apply your patch, thus preventing a full skin area for drug release.

There are 2 versions of the drug; one stings, the other is a 'non-sting" version. But the stuff works.

3. Medical/Surgical tape - You can use medical tape on the edges also. If the patch has come off, don't toss it if it's still intact and not stuck to itself. Clean the area where it was thoroughly, then put the patch back on using tape on the edges to hold it in place. Once removed from the skin, the patch adhesive is no longer strong enough to hold it in place on its own, so it needs tape or something like a Bioclusive patch to hold it. It takes a bit of time, but if you've got enough Fentanyl left in the patch, it'll start transferring within an hour or more depending on your body heat.

Having said that, at times requiring 2 100mcg patches myself every 48 hours (I'm in a small percentage of the population that only gets 48 hours out of the patch) I eventually figured out that the best way to keep them from coming off while sweating was to ensure they were put on properly in the first place. The only way to do this is to remove all skin oils from the area where the patch is going to be.

Ah, you say - but the directions say not to use alcohol for skin preparation, right? Actually, yes and no - the directions say not to use alcohol and THEN apply the patch. The reason for this is that Isopropyl Alcohol leaves a residue that can block drug release. So how do you get around this problem?

The answer is to use Isopropyl to clean the skin area, the to rinse/flush the area with water afterward to remove any residue left by the alcohol. Be sure not to use any soaps either, as they leave residue also.

Having used 1 or 2 100mcg Fentanyl patches for over 10 years now, I've always used them on my biceps, since for me they're the best place which affords the least skin flexing. Where you place your patch has a major effect on its adhesive capability as well. Any patch must be placed above the waist; many cancer patients I've known who've used them prior to passing on had them placed on the back. Anywhere you place the patch is supposed to be free of any body hair, as even small hairs can interfere with the patch. I've use mine for so long in the same place on both arms that hair doesn't grow there anymore, but when first starting I had to shave the areas where I put the patches. If you're wondering, I switch arms every time I switch change patches. You must give the area where you place your patch enough time to breathe and replenish itself.

I also offer this advice to any Fentanyl Patch user; as Schedule 2 opiate patients, all of us know the extreme restrictions placed on us by Federal Law, including the "minor problem" of only being given 30 days worth of medicine, only to lose one or more to sweating. I learned many years ago to maintain at least a 30 day emergency supply of all of my opiate medications, both primary and breakthrough (120/150 Percocet 10/325's per month). It is not easy to save up that much - if you have a good relationship with your Pain Specialist, you can always ask for extra, but be absolutely honest in why you're asking for it. Having had more bad doctors than good, it took a long time for me to find a good Pain Specialist, so be sure you've got a good one before saying anything if you should choose to try and bank extras for emergencies.

In my case, I used my breakthrough meds to substitute for my patches on those days when my pain wasn't as bad. It typically takes me a year to save that much - I've always kept my doctor informed, and he in turn has always given me a little extra in my prescription when my emergency supply ran low due to problems with my HMO or some other stupid reason. But I had the same doctor for 9 years, and I was one of his best patients. Never break the trust between you and your Pain Doctor - ever.

Those who have specific or further questions concerning patch adhesion may email me at the address at the top of my Supervisor Bio page.

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Medication and Drugs
Drug Tests
Chronic Pain Drugs
Pain Management
Nerve Pain

How can you tell a new pain management doctor about a failed drug test from a previous pain doctor?

Just tell them. They should also be able to check records (since you moved to a new doctor, the old doctor's records must be made available to them).

Mistakes happen, twice I have bee told that my drug screening showed that I had been taking a much higher dose than I was prescribed for pain. I told my doctor that I wanted to find out how this happened and we discovered that he had increased my dosage of pain medication and the Lab who was screening did not have the information. Mistakes do happen.

My doctor also advised me that their was a 15% of incorrect screening of urine samples. It is definitely something that should be looked into if you know that their is an error.

262728
Medication and Drugs
Chronic Pain Drugs

What pill is round and white with m on one side and T7 on the other?

This is likely a 50 mg tramadol, manufactured by Mylan pharmaceuticals. For a confirmatory image, please see related link..

151617
Chronic Pain Drugs

How do you get prescribed to opana?

opana is mainly perscribed for back and neck pain. severe back and neck pain. my 5th lumbar is fractured and i have multiple fractures up and down my spine and still have yet to be perscribed to any painkiller. good luck

212223
Oxycodone
Painkillers
Chronic Pain Drugs
OxyContin
Hormones

What is the function of oxytocin?

Reduces stress and produced positive feelings.

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Oxycodone
Chronic Pain Drugs

What does 15mg Oxycontin look like?

Brand name 15mg OxyContin looks strikingly similar in size, shape and color to 80mg OxyContin. The only difference I noticed is the imprint "15" rather than "80". Although I am just slightly colorblind, I am confident that it is pretty much the same shade of green.

------------

The 80 mg pills are slightly larger than the pills of other strengths (which are all the same size) and, like was said, the 80 mg pills are green but the 15 mg pills are actually black. Perdue (the manufacturer of OxyContin) has a chart on their website showing the various strengths and what they look like.

http://www.purduepharma.com/imagesour_productsproductoxycontin.gif

202122
Men's Health
Chronic Pain Drugs

What is Watson 852?

watson 852 is a markings that indicate the drug is APAP with Codeine #3

It contains 300mg of acetaminophen and 30mg of codeine. It is a scheduled drug (narcotic) and is used for treatment of pain

Visit http://www.SCPharmacist.net for reliable health care information and prescription saving resources.

192021
Conditions and Diseases
Codeine
Chronic Pain Drugs

Treatment for a chip fracture?

It depends on the part of the body the chip is in - if it 's part of an appendage (arm, leg, toe, finger, etc.) usually there's not much to do except let it heal, unless it's interfering with mobility or the use of the limb itself. In those cases it can simply be removed.

Same goes for chips in other parts of the body - depending on where it is and whether or not it's a threat to an organ or is in a position to cause further harm, the decision might be to remove it. In most cases though it's just left alone if it's not a threat to anything.

131415
Acetaminophen (Tylenol)
Ibuprofen
Chronic Pain Drugs
The Difference Between

What are the main differences between acetaminophen and ibuprofen and acetylsalicylic acid and naproxen?

Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) has antipyretic (fever reducing) effects, as well as analgesic (pain reducing) effects and anti-inflammatory effects. It is also an effective anti-platelet medication, helping to prevent heart attacks, strokes and blood clotting. however, aspirin should not be used for children, as there is a risk of Reye's Syndrome. In adults, aspirin is quite effective, but limitations include stomach irritation, gastritis and ulcers (and this is further exacerbated in those who consume alcohol - especially concurrently).

Acetaminophen is an effective antipyretic and analgesic, but not particularly effective as an anti-inflammatory, although it does help to decrease the pain of degenerative joint disease. Acetaminophen may be given to children as it does not carry the risk of Reye's Syndrome (as aspirin does). However, acetaminophen is dangerous in overdose. Acetaminophen toxicity is the leading cause of liver failure in the U.S. Acetaminophen has no significant anti-platelet activity.

Ibuprofen belongs to a large group of medications known as NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs). Ibuprofen is an antipyretic, analgesic and anti-inflammatory agent (just as aspirin is). However, it carries only mild anti-platelet activity. It is useful, in its own right, and when combined with opiates for pain treatment (especially post-operatively). Ibuprofen, like all NSAIDs has GI side effects, especially when used in excess (e.g. gastritis, ulcers) and also renal (kidney) toxicity in overdose (or situations of excess high-dose usage, chronically). Ibuprofen has less risk of drug-drug interactions than either aspirin or acetaminophen.

Naproxen is a NSAID medication (in the same general NSAID class as ibuprofen. it is, therefore, an antipyretic, analgesic and anti-inflammatory medication). It is used in all forms of arthritis, as well as gout, ankylosing spondylitis, menstrual cramps, tendinitis, bursitis, headaches, and the like.

All of the above four medications are potentially very effective when used correctly.

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Dilaudid
Chronic Pain Drugs

What is dilated pain medicine?

Dilaudid is a very strong and addictive medication, used for moderate to severe pain. DO NOT play with this type of pharmacuetical, it has an incredible potential for abuse, and overdose.

91011
Medication and Drugs
Oxycodone
Painkillers
Acute & Breakthrough Pain Drugs
Percocet and Percodan
Chronic Pain Drugs
Fentanyl
Duragesic Patches

How does percocet interact with Fentanyl patch?

Duragesic (Fentanyl Transdermal) patches are used for Primary Chronic Pain; they last for up to 3 days depending on the patient and tolerance level. For example, I'm one of a small percentage of the population that only gets 48 hours from my patches, and that's due to my high tolerance level - I've been using them for 9 years.

Percocet (Oxycodone and Tylenol) is used for Breakthrough Pain - Breakthrough Pain is that pain which the patient feels after activity causes pain being controlled by the patches to exceed the pain controlling capability of the Fentanyl. Percocet, being an Acute pain drug, is used to compensate for the temporary increase in pain.

The combination of Fentanyl patches and Percocet is very common - I myself have used the combination in varying strengths and doses for a very long time. While I'm currently using the strongest doses available, at times I've had to increase my dosages and augment them with other opiates such as Demerol and MS Contin.

131415
Morphine
Chronic Pain Drugs
Opiates

What would the lethal dose of morphine be if administered rectally?

It depends on weight,age,and,health of patient.

121314
Health
Medication and Drugs
Chronic Pain Drugs

What is the disadvantage of using generic name of drugs?

i couldn't possibly think of one thing... its the same medication. i can think of an ADVANTAGE... it'd be cheaper!

121314
Opium
Painkillers
Chronic Pain Drugs

How do you know if you are a drug user?

You know your a drug user when you do the drugs

111213
Health
Marijuana
Oxycodone
Chronic Pain Drugs

Does qcarbo32 detox formula work?

Works everytime. Gotta use the real stuff at gnc and follow directions to the T

345
Methadone
Chronic Pain Drugs
Drug Withdrawal

How long does one dose of methadone last?

Well depending on the dose, its half-life is usually 24-36 hours. My first dose of methadone was 30mg and it lasted almost 48 hours and I was really "high" from it. But after a few weeks that high feeling goes away and you start to feel normal. But yes, methadone is a very long-acting opiate and will last much longer than most other opiates.

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