Halloween

Halloween is a holiday celebrated on October 31. It has roots in the Celtic festival of Samhain and the Christian holy day of All Saints. Ask any questions associated with Halloween such as jack-o'-lanterns, trick-or-treating, ghosts, bonfires, costumes, haunted houses, reading scary stories, and watching horror movies, to name a few.

Asked in Halloween, Languages and Cultures, France

What is Halloween called in France?

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It is called just the same, but this isn't part of the culture in France.
Asked in Halloween, Costumes, Vampires

How do you keep the collar up on a vampire dress?

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You have to borrow your puppy's collar with lots of rhinestones on it and spruce up your vampire dress collar with multiple jewels.
Asked in Thanksgiving, Halloween, Utah

Where did trick or treating come from?

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The custom of 'trick or treat' probably has several origins, mostly Irish. An old Irish peasant practice called for going door to door to collect money, bread cake, cheese, eggs, butter, nuts, apples, etc., in preparation for the festival of St. Columbus Kill. Yet another custom was the begging for soul cakes, or offerings for one's self - particularly in exchange for promises of prosperity or protection against bad luck. It is with this custom the concept of the fairies came to be incorporated as people used to go door to door begging for treats. Failure to supply the treats would usually result in practical jokes being visited on the owner of the house. The tradition started with a fear of the god of the dead taking over the sun on November 1, the Celt's new year. They dressed in costumes to hide from the god and some tried to trick him by putting on demon costumes (this is where the whole "scary costume" thing started). The costumes eventually evolved into what it is now. the reason people give away treats on Halloween is because people were afraid of a certain god (I don't know his/her name) and offered treats in return of leaving them alone. This evolved into people giving this for fun. Halloween was the celebration the farmers did because it was the end of harvest and they traded goods to each other, but if you didn't give you would get a mean trick that could even kill you. There were cultist and on Halloween that warded off evil spirits by wearing mask and lanterns, but instead of a Jack-O'-Lantern they used turnips to scare away the spirits another story of the jack o lantern is that there was a trickster named jack that tricked the devil into climbing up a tree and the devil got stuck, so he cursed Jack's soul to walk in the darkness with just a turnip lantern to guide him. Of course turnips weren't common in the U.S.A so they used Pumpkins And that's the stary of the Jack-O'-Lantern. And if your thinking Halloween is evil its not if any thing the church is evil, the Irish people were visited by the "Saints" and they wanted them to stop worshiping all of their Gods and stop their holidays but the peope loved Halloween and wouldn't give it up. So if you can't beat them join them, so the church made all Hallows Eve.
Asked in Halloween

What is the origin of trick-or-treating on Halloween?

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Although trick-or-treating did not gain popularity in the United States until the 1950s, the tradition has Celtic roots. October 31 is known as Samhain, a day when the dead returned to the earth. During Celtic celebrations of Samhain, many people wore disguises to ward off evil spirits. Groups of "guisers" performed plays in homes they visited. They were rewarded with treats of food. The children would also carve out lanterns from a turnip (now we use pumpkins) to resemble a scary face. The children would go around the neighborhood, carrying their turnip lantern on a piece of string and knock on doors and say "please help the guisers." The kids would be required to sing a song, or say a poem or tell a joke for which they would receive sweets, fruit, nuts or money. After they had been guising they would go home and put some nuts and fruit in a basin of water. With their hands behind their back, they would attempt to lift the fruit and nuts out of the water with their mouths. This was called "dookin", and sometimes called "dookin fer aiples" (now known as "bobbing for apples"). These traditions are still practiced today in Scotland although many children will now say "trick-or-treat" instead of "please help the guisers" since they see this on TV and in American movies. The children do not however play tricks on the neighbors, they still have to recite a verse or sing a song for their reward. Another explanation for trick-or-treating is that it comes from "souling," a tradition in Ireland and Great Britain. While souling, the poor would go from home to home and pray for each family's dead, and the families gave them small cakes to eat. Others believe the tradition of trick-or-treating is related most closely to old urban Thanksgiving traditions of costumes and pranks. This "ragamuffin" tradition was popular in urban areas like New York and Boston, and consisted of costumed children parading around the streets begging for coins or treats, and pulling pranks when they didn't get anything. Shopkeepers would often 'buy off' these pranksters, trading some sweet snack or bread loaf for security from soaped windows or pilfered shop signs. By the early 1900s these children would parade through the streets in their costumes, becoming an established holiday event, the 'ragamuffin parade.' However, spectacle parades like the Macy's parade began to overrun these prankster traditions in the 1920s, and the Depression of the 1930s, all but rubbed the begging traditions out. Instead, Halloween became the new time for tricks and treats--and as the treats became scarce, the tricks became vandalism. Things got out of control in the 1930s, with several brawls and acts of violence associated with Halloween pranking. To counter this, homes started to offer parties for children, as an incentive to curb vandalism. Candy and treats were offered, in other words, literally to stop children from misbehaving on Halloween. After a slowdown in WWII (when sugar was severely rationed), the post-WWII baby boom led to the solidification of modern trick-or-treating. It was bolstered by the manufacturing spirit of the 1950s, which saw the first real bags of bite-sized candy treats readily available for eager trick-or-treaters.
Asked in Halloween

At Halloween parties guest traditionally''bob'' for?

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Apples. The game is set up this way. A large tub of water is brought in and many apples are added to the tub. The player must not touch the apple with his hands but must retrieve the apple by biting it and lifting it from the tub. This results in a wet face and much hilarity.
Asked in Halloween

What day is trick or treating in fl?

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Halloween- 31st October
Asked in Halloween

Why do we celebrate Halloween?

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The current Halloween holiday comes from an old Celtic celebration called All Hallows Eve (translated to All Saints Day). During the festival they would bless and convert Pagans. We call it "Halloween" because "Hallow" means saints, and "-een" (originally e'en) means Evening. All Hallows Eve. The Celtics were the ones who originally wore masks to scare away evil spirits and prevent demons from identifying them as humans. Trick-or-treating represents how the spirits would visit Celtics' homes disguised as people in hopes of claiming a new soul. The treat part is for the feast after the whole fiasco was over. Bobbing for apples originally came from honoring a Celtic fruit god. Here are some popular reasons for celebrating Halloween from our community: The word Halloween is derived from All Hallow's Eve. November 1 is All Hallows' Day, or All Saints' Day. The festival has its roots in Pagan festivals surrounding the Autumn season as well. Various traditions of singing, lighting candles, and rituals to ward off evil spirits or put the dead at peace evolved in several different cultures. The commercialization of Halloween originated in North America. It has something to do with All Hallows Day. They would dress up as scary things to scare away the evil monsters and spirits. Halloween is the evening before All Saints' Day. For me it's just a day for me to wear costumes and trick or treat for free candy. Well to celebrate Halloween you need a couple of friends around the house, some kids... get ready with the spookiest trick o treats and amazing Halloween games... and yes not to forget the scary Halloween costume. Another reason is because in the earlier times they had gatherings and would dress up in a costume. That was out of the country at that time, but when the immigrants came to this country they brought their culture. So that's how Halloween came about. We dress up honoring the Celtics, who would wear masks to scare away evil spirits & not have the demons identify them as humans. Almost everything has to do with this whole celebration. Because it's fun! Halloween comes from the Pagan holiday of Samhain (sow-in). It was the Celtic new year, and it is believed to be the time when the portals between the spirit world and our world are the thinnest. People dress up on Halloween today because the original Pagan tradition was to dress up to scare off evil spirits. There are many differences between today's celebration of Halloween and the holiday that Pagans celebrate, including the fact that some pagan families leave an extra plate out at dinner for each of the family members lost that year. They put food on the plates and (at least in my family) they leave the food outside of the porch or on the alter so that the souls of the family members can find their way back to the family and be at peace.
Asked in Halloween, Word and Phrase Origins, Name Origins

Where does the name Halloween come from?

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Halloween was originally a Pagan holy day called "All Hallows Eve." It was one of four holy days - and the most powerful - throughout the year when spirits could walk the earth and communicate with the living. The word "Halloween" comes from All-Hallows-Eve as it is at the end off All-Hallows-Day, which is also know as All-Saints-Day. ("Hallow" is an Old English word for "saint.") Although nowadays All-Saints-Day falls one day after Halloween, they used to be celebrated together on the same day. Satanists have adopted Halloween as one of their three main seasonal days of celebration. (The others are Wallopings Noach on May 1 and the Satanist's birthday.) It is derived from the two words, Hallows Evening. Correctly spelled, Halloween is actually Hallowe'en. ; Halloween : c.1745, Scottish shortening of Allhallow-even "Eve of All Saints, last night of October" (1556), the last night of the year in the old Celtic calendar, where it was Old Year's Night, a night for witches. Another pagan holiday given a cursory baptism and sent on its way. Hallowmas "All-saints" is first attested 1389. See the Related Link below.
Asked in Halloween

What ancient priests first celebrated Halloween?

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The Druids were among the first people to celebrate Halloween.
Asked in Halloween, Candy

What is the history of Halloween?

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Halloween is an annual celebration, but just what is it actually a celebration of? And how did this peculiar custom originate? Is it, as some claim, a kind of demon worship? Or is it just a harmless vestige of some ancient pagan ritual? The word itself, "Halloween," actually has its origins in the Catholic Church. It comes from a contracted corruption of All Hallows Eve. November 1, "All Hollows Day" (or "All Saints Day"), is a Catholic day of observance in honor of saints. But, in the 5th century BC, in Celtic Ireland, summer officially ended on October 31. The holiday was called Samhain (sow-en), the Celtic New year. One story says that, on that day, the disembodied spirits of all those who had died throughout the preceding year would come back in search of living bodies to possess for the next year. It was believed to be their only hope for the afterlife. The Celts believed all laws of space and time were suspended during this time, allowing the spirit world to intermingle with the living. Naturally, the still-living did not want to be possessed. So on the night of October 31, villagers would extinguish the fires in their homes, to make them cold and undesirable. They would then dress up in all manner of ghoulish costumes and noisily paraded around the neighborhood, being as destructive as possible in order to frighten away spirits looking for bodies to possess. Probably a better explanation of why the Celts extinguished their fires was not to discourage spirit possession, but so that all the Celtic tribes could relight their fires from a common source, the Druidic fire that was kept burning in the Middle of Ireland, at Usinach. Some accounts tell of how the Celts would burn someone at the stake who was thought to have already been possessed, as sort of a lesson to the spirits. Other accounts of Celtic history debunk these stories as myth. The Romans adopted the Celtic practices as their own. But in the first century AD, Samhain was assimilated into celebrations of some of the other Roman traditions that took place in October, such as their day to honor Pomona, the Roman goddess of fruit and trees. The symbol of Pomona is the apple, which might explain the origin of our modern tradition of bobbing for apples on Halloween. The thrust of the practices also changed over time to become more ritualized. As belief in spirit possession waned, the practice of dressing up like hobgoblins, ghosts, and witches took on a more ceremonial role. The custom of Halloween was brought to America in the 1840's by Irish immigrants fleeing their country's potato famine. At that time, the favorite pranks in New England included tipping over outhouses and unhinging fence gates. The custom of trick-or-treating is thought to have originated not with the Irish Celts, but with a ninth-century European custom called souling. On November 2, All Souls Day, early Christians would walk from village to village begging for "soul cakes," made out of square pieces of bread with currants. The more soul cakes the beggars would receive, the more prayers they would promise to say on behalf of the dead relatives of the donors. At the time, it was believed that the dead remained in limbo for a time after death, and that prayer, even by strangers, could expedite a soul's passage to heaven. The Jack-o-lantern custom probably comes from Irish folklore. As the tale is told, a man named Jack, who was notorious as a drunkard and trickster, tricked Satan into climbing a tree. Jack then carved an image of a cross in the tree's trunk, trapping the devil up the tree. Jack made a deal with the devil that, if he would never tempt him again, he would promise to let him down the tree. According to the folk tale, after Jack died, he was denied entrance to Heaven because of his evil ways, but he was also denied access to Hell because he had tricked the devil. Instead, the devil gave him a single ember to light his way through the frigid darkness. The ember was placed inside a hollowed-out turnip to keep it glowing longer. The Irish used turnips as their "Jack's lanterns" originally. But when the immigrants came to America, they found that pumpkins were far more plentiful than turnips. So the Jack-O-Lantern in America was a hollowed-out pumpkin, lit with an ember. So, although some cults may have adopted Halloween as their favorite "holiday," the day itself did not grow out of evil practices. It grew out of the rituals of Celts celebrating a new year, and out of Medieval prayer rituals of Europeans. And today, even many churches have Halloween parties or pumpkin carving events for the kids. After all, the day itself is only as evil as one cares to make it. Halloween was started by christians as the day that the portal from the dead and the living was open thus spreading doom to the living.
Asked in Halloween

What is the most widely recognized symbol of Halloween?

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It is probably the Pumpkin that is the most widely recognized symbol of Halloween
Asked in Halloween

What was used to make Jack-o-Lanterns before pumpkins?

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Turnips were used before pumpkins to make Jack'O Lanterns.
Asked by Blaze Rogahn in Horror and Suspense Movies, Classic Horror Movies, Movies, Halloween

What is the best scary movie to watch on Halloween?

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The obvious answer, of course, is John Carpenter's Halloween (1978), which was one of the very first "slasher" horror films that became ever—so—popular in the 1980s. Other notable films in the horror genre that have given me the creeps in particular are The Birds (1963), Alien (1979), The Shining (1980), John Carpenter's The Thing (1982), It Follows (2014), The Witch (2015), Hereditary (2018), and this year's The Lighthouse.
Asked in Halloween

What time and when do you go trick or treat in Charlotte NC?

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I've been online searching for this answer and can't believe how difficult it is to get an answer in Charlotte, NC. Other cities and states have a straight forward calandar of times but there is no definate answer for Charlotte. Why is that?
Asked in Halloween, Costumes

Where can you buy elf ears?

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Depending on where you live there should be a lot of Halloween stores opening up (they do in Southern California). Or you could always buy them online its still early enough to get the ears in time for the 31st.
Asked in Halloween

How did Halloween get its name?

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Halloween was originally called All Hallows' Eve which means the evening before All Saints' Day. "Hallow" is an Old English word for "saint". This was shortened to Hallowe'en and finally to Halloween. Satanists have adopted Hallowe'en as one of their three main seasonal days of celebration. The others are Walpurgus Nacht on MAY-1 and the Satanist's birthday. All-Saints-Day and All-Hallows-Eve were never celebrated together. it has always been the day after. Halloween's name is a shortening of All Hallows Eve, the day on which some believe all the bad spirits come out.
Asked in Religion & Spirituality, Halloween, Pentecostal

What religion celebrates Halloween now?

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It is not a religious day. so, its celebration is based on the country practices and cultures. However, Muslims for sure do not celebrate it.
Asked in Child Health, Halloween, Candy

Why is candy involved in halloween?

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The Romans would pass out pastries to the poor. We just evolved it to passing out candy to kids.
Asked in Holidays and Traditions, Halloween

What countries celebrate Halloween?

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It's most common in America, Canada, Britain and Ireland, but is celebrated in many countries. In some countries Halloween is seen as disrespectful and is banned, or disapproved.
Asked in Halloween

Why is apple-bobbing a traditional Halloween game?

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The custom is mentioned along with apples suspended on a string passed through the apple in 18th century Ireland by a gentleman named Charles Vallancey in his book called The Collectanea de Rebus Hibernicis. The current game we have is based on a New Years eve tradition, where whoever may chokes on the apple first in the group will be the first to marry