Neuroscience

Any of the sciences that deal with the functions of the human nervous system and brain -- perception, memory, consciousness and learning.

4,420 Questions
Psychology
Neuroscience

Are empaths real?

Except for people with certain personality disorders, everyone can feel empathy. Those who claim to be empaths, however, take it to another level entirely. They say they can literally feel what is going on in someone else's body in their own.

It's a pretty extraordinary claim, and as such, it hasn't been conclusively proven, though there are studies that show some people are naturally more empathetic than others. For example, there's a phenomenon called mirror-touch synaesthesia in which someone who sees a person being touched feels that touch on their own skin.

On the whole, though, the levels of empathy empaths purport to possess aren't fully proven.

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Health
Neuroscience
Emotions

Does anger kill brain cells?

Actually, anger induces emotional stress, which takes a toll on brain cells by increasing adrenergic activity via the HPA (hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal) axis. This causes increases in cortisol, a stress hormone. Emotional stress also induces cumulative cellular damage due to increases in what is called oxidative stress (the increased metabolic breakdown of cellular materials leading to free radical production).

While young persons have bodies that have much less cumulative damage (due to youth), and have active DNA and cellular repair mechanisms, as people get older, these repair mechanisms accumulate damage themselves (through environmental factors and even the cells' own metabolic processes), and they work less effectively.

Since emotional/oxidate stress has been shown to increase the "load" on cells, increasing the rate of this damage, the older a person gets, and the more stress the body is under, the more likely their cells will be unable to repair this damage, and the more likely that brain cell death will increase.

Now, there are many other, more pronounced mechanisms that result in brain cell death or deactivation in the presence of emotional stress. The homeostatic, regulatory factors of the brain can sense prolonged adrenergic stress and will downregulate (desensitize) certain neural pathways in order to minimize the stress signal. It also "rewires" certain neural pathways to adapt to stressful environments. Large-scale changes based on high-stress are often found in neurotic (anxiety) disorders and in PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder).

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Human Anatomy and Physiology
Neuroscience
Nervous System
Emotions

What is permissive action as in the nervous system?

sdsgs

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Genetics
Mycology or Fungi
Neuroscience

How does cell shape change during osmosis and cell diffusion?

Osmosis and diffusion are processes in which water or other molecules move in or out of a cell respectively.

If the molecules/water move into the cell then the cell volume increases and the cell will expand in size (become more turgid).

If the molecules/water move out of the cell then the cell volume will reduce and the cell will shrink in size (become more flaccid).

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Neuroscience
Nerves

What is the effect when the neuron will not fire?

Then the signal will not be sent. The entire chain leading from the CNS to wherever it's going will be disturbed and will come to a halt.

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Health
Medication and Drugs
Neuroscience

The effect of a drug that is an agonist is to?

An agonist binds to a receptor and stimulates it (turns it on).

An antagonist binds to a receptor and blocks it from being activated by other molecules (turns it off).

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Science
Nerve Pain
Neuroscience

Why do you need nerve cells?

Organisms need nerve cells to respond to the environment. Plants respond to the environment through reactions to and the production of chemicals. Animals often have to react more quickly to the environment to avoid danger, capture food, secure a mate etc.

Nerve cells in humans allow us to think (the brain), see, avoid pain and danger. There is a rare disorder where people do not feel pain. This is very dangerous as the can break a limb or bleed without knowing they are injured.

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Health
Neuroscience

Can ephedra increase dopamine?

umm wouldn't it decrease sine ephedra is simliar to norephedrine and epinephrine, thus supressing them naturally and dopamine is precurser to those two hormones so if ephedra supresses those two it should supress dopamine too

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Blood
Conditions and Diseases
Neuroscience

What types of agnosia are there?

There are three major types of agnosia: visual agnosia, auditory agnosia, and tactile agnosia.

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Neuroscience

What is the function of stria terminalis?

It serves as a pathway for association of olfactory and visceral functions.

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Health
Neuroscience
Neurology

Who is regarded as the father of neurology?

S. Weir Mitchell

(1829-1914)

JMC Class of 1850

Answer 2

Jane Martin Charcot

see link below.

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Neuroscience

What can you do with a masters in neurobiology?

Companies need analysts (drug companies, venture firms). Also this is a good background to becoming a teacher at either the high school or community college level. Assistant researcher posts would also be avaialble to someone with a Master's degree. Of course if research is where your heart is, then you could use this degree for entry into a PhD program.

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Health
Conditions and Diseases
Neuroscience

Can seizures go undiagnosed?

With regard to grand mal seizures, it usually only takes one or more to be disruptive enough to warrant seeking medical help. If you have more than one seizure, and you continue to have them, then you are usually diagnosed with epilepsy. Your doctor will start you on medication to see if that will keep them under control. 60 to 70 percent of people with epilepsy are able to keep it under control with medication. With the other 30 to 40 percent there are other alternatives.

Now, there are other forms of seizures that can often go undiagnosed. These are called the petit mal seizures. They generally take of the form of lapses of consciousness for a very short period of time (usually on the order of seconds). During this time, a person's expression will usually "freeze" into a blank expression or smile, they appear to be dazed, and then they return to normalcy a few seconds later. This form of seizure is often benign and short-lived in duration, while it can remain persistent.

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Human Anatomy and Physiology
Zoology or Animal Biology
Neuroscience

What does the expression depolarization refer to?

Depolarization refers to the reversal of charges of neuron cell membrane, it occurs by moving in of 'Na' ions .

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Cats (Felines)
Neuroscience
Nerves

How many neuron connections does a cat have in its brain?

300 million

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ADD-ADHD
Neuroscience
Neurology

Can a neurologist help children with ADHD?

ADHD is most commonly, due to an deficiency in dopaminergic activity in the prefrontal cortex, which leads to more impulsivity, difficulty staying still (inhibiting movement), and diffculty maintaining focus or concentrating.

The most common reason for this is due to mutations (variations) in the dopamine receptor genes, which lead to reduced binding affinities for dopamine (dopamine can't bind as well to the existing dopamine receptors, leading to reduced dopaminergic activity in the brain).

That is why dopaminergic stimulants are most often used to treat ADHD, as it is a neurochemical disorder.

As such, a neurologist or psychiatrist can administer medication or help with alternative therapies to help treat the disorder.

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Health
Medication and Drugs
Depression and Bipolar Disorder
Neuroscience
Blood Transfusions

Can you give blood if you're taking medication for bipolar disorder?

Yes. Most of the drugs used in psychoactive disorders have relatively short half-lives, so even trace amounts would quickly get metabolized and eliminated by the new host. In any case, the Red Cross has guidelines for donors on certain medications (see link below).

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Health
Genetics
Neuroscience

Can DNA determine behavior traits?

Yes. But neuroscientists and behavioral scientists are both aware that behavior can impact DNA, as well.

Since DNA codes for neurotransmitter receptors, metabolic enzymes, regulatory factors, and so forth, they can affect the way in which neurons function, connect, and communicate with one another, which, in turn, affects behavior.

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Bridges and Tunnels
Hemispheres
Neuroscience
Brain

What connects the two hemispheres of the brain?

This bridge is a large bundle of nerve fibers called the corpus collosum.
Corpus Callosum

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Neuroscience
Immune System

The endocrine system has no direct role in?

The endocrine system has no direct role in?

A. Sexual

B. Sensory perception

C. Metabolism

D. Composition of blood and bones

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Neuroscience
Nerves

Which channel is mainly responsible for the resting potential of a neuron?

Potassium leak channel

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Biology
Neuroscience
Comparisons

What is the comparison between the nervous system and the endocrine system?

The best way to compare the nervous system and the endocrine system is to compare the characteristics of speed, specificity and plasticity (ability to respond and change permanently, particularly with respect to strength and speed.) The nervous system uses rapid electrical signals along nerve axons. Chemical signals are used between nerve cells at synapses. Although this chemical transmission is slower than electrical transmission, synapses are important in transmission between nerve cells. The endocrine system uses hormones, which are secreted into and transported to their target cells via the circulation of blood. Due to the delay of circulation, hormonal responses are generally slower than nervous response. Both systems involve diffusion (either diffusion out of blood and into tissue or diffusion across a synapse). However, the diffusion distances in synapses is considerably smaller in nervous communication so further increasing its speed over hormonal communication. The nervous system is not considered as specific as the endocrine system, with the nervous system supplying group of tissues or organs. For example, one motor neurone induces and effect of several muscle fibers. Organs such as skeletal muscle, smooth muscles and glands are targeted individually. Due to receptor sites on target cells, the endocrine system is able to be very specific is binding specifically to the appropriate cells. The nervous system is more associated with plasticity. Synaptic plasticity results in changes in the quantity of neurotransmitter released and how effectively the postsynaptic cells respond to the neurotransmitter. Although the effects of hormones are generally more permanent, the system is considered more elastic than plastic (changing but then returning to the original.) In conclusion, the body often combines the speed of the nervous system with the specificity of the endocrine system to create the neuroendocrine system. Neuroendocrine cells receive neurally transmitted information and release hormones in response which is carried via blood the the target cells. The neuroendocrine system is mainly organised by the hypothalamus.

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Energy
Electrostatics
Neuroscience

Conduction of an action potential in a myelinated axon is called?

Saltatory Conduction.

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Health
Conditions and Diseases
Neuroscience

What is uncinate disease?

Uncinate disease does not exist, per se. "Uncinate fits" were first described in 1881. These "fits" are now known as temporal lobe seizures. The disease is known as temporal lobe epilepsy.

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Conditions and Diseases
Neuroscience
The Difference Between

What is the difference between huntington's chorea and sydenham's chorea?

  • huntington's chorea:
    • it's an autosomal dominant inherited disease
    • it causes the degeneration of neurons mainly in caudate nucleus, which then will cause the widening of anterior horns of your lateral ventricles
  • syndenham's chorea:
    • it might affect children suffering from rheumatic fever
    • involuntary movements are transient and followed by full recovery
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