Scones

Scones are British single-serving cakes or quick-bread. They are made with either wheat, barley or oatmeal and baking powder. They are usually lightly sweetened with sugar, cinnamon or honey - or a mixture of each - and may contain fruit such as raisins or cherries. Sometimes they are glazed with icing. They are often eaten by the British with tea and cream. Their popularity was spread throughout the globe via the British Empire. Scones are not to be confused with tea cakes or sweet buns, which are entirely different British cakes.

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What is the history of scones?

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scones are from scottland
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What is the recipe for scones?

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cooking time: 10 to 30 minutes preparation time: less than 30 minutes Ingredients 225g/8oz self raising flour pinch of salt 55g/2oz butter 25g/1oz caster sugar 150ml/5fl oz milk Method 1. Heat the oven to 220C/425F/Gas 7. Lightly grease a baking sheet. 2. Mix together the flour and salt and rub in the butter. 3. Stir in the sugar and then the milk to get a soft dough. 4. Turn on to a floured work surface and knead very lightly. Pat out to a round 2cm/¾in thick. Use a 5cm/2in cutter to stamp out rounds and place on a baking sheet. Lightly knead together the rest of the dough and stamp out more scones to use it all up. 5. Brush the tops of the scones with a little milk. Bake for 12-15 minutes until well risen and golden. 6. Cool on a wire rack and serve with butter and good jam and maybe some clotted cream. hope this helps x
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Are scones eaten in France?

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I'm very sure of it.
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What can you put in savory scones?

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The classic thing to put in the scone mixture is cheese; sourcream and chive is also good. Choritzo or some other kind of spiced sausage might be quite nice, possibly with saffron. Or you could try adding some cornmeal/polenta, lemon, coriander and ancho chilis (cream cheese or creme fraiche filling). Black pudding might make an interesting addition (cubed, to the dough). The possibilities are fairly limitless; just think of a meal that you enjoy and see what elements of it you can add to a scone. Nb. For most of these flavors, the scone dough will need plenty of salt in it, to ensure that it cannot be mistaken for a "sweet scone" and to enhance the flavors of the other ingredients. In savory scones, salt is even more important than in sweet scones.
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When do Irish people eat Irish scones?

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because britan can only make half as much food is they need so we need to make the other half for them and our own food so it is better if we eat only irish food then less people will lose their jobs and less companies will shut down if we eat our own food we are helpin irish people get more money to make more food
Asked in Scones, Cornbread

Can glass baking dish be used for scones or cornbread?

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Yes, both cornbread and scones can be baked in glass baking dishes.
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What is a group of scones called?

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I would say the same for biscuits of cookies: batch.
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Whats the collective noun for scones?

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The collective noun for scones is batch. 'A batch of scones'
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Do you eat scons or scones?

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You eat scones... They are yummy... Scons is a computer software tool... I don't think it would be really appetizing... Yum gigabytes...?
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Are scones good for you?

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They're fine; the sugar content of plain scones is low and the fat (usually butter) isn't too high. The other ingredients - flour and milk - balance well. Fruit scones are much higher in sugar than plain. Don't, however, make a habit of regularly eating scones covered in jam and butter or cream. Once in a while is okay, as a treat.
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How are scones shaped?

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Like a biscuit.
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When preparing biscuits scones or other breads made with the rubbed-dough method it is important to?

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your work surface should be cool to very cool to keep down the heat that will be caused by friction when working with the dough. if you happen to have a marble cutting board that works great
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What can you eat a scone with?

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you can enjoy a scone with sweet butter, clotted cream, or fresh lemon curd:)
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Why do you need ingredients to make scones?

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Simple Scones INGREDIENTS * 2 cups all-purpose flour * 1/3 cup sugar * 1 teaspoon baking powder * 1/4 teaspoon baking soda * 1/2 teaspoon salt * 8 tablespoons unsalted butter, frozen * 1/2 cup raisins (or dried currants) * 1/2 cup sour cream * 1 large egg DIRECTIONS # Adjust oven rack to lower-middle position and preheat oven to 400 degrees. # In a medium bowl, mix flour, 1/3 cup sugar, baking powder, baking soda and salt. Grate butter into flour mixture on the large holes of a box grater; use your fingers to work in butter (mixture should resemble coarse meal), then stir in raisins. # In a small bowl, whisk sour cream and egg until smooth. # Using a fork, stir sour cream mixture into flour mixture until large dough clumps form. Use your hands to press the dough against the bowl into a ball. (The dough will be sticky in places, and there may not seem to be enough liquid at first, but as you press, the dough will come together.) # Place on a lightly floured surface and pat into a 7- to 8-inch circle about 3/4-inch thick. Sprinkle with remaining 1 tsp. of sugar. Use a sharp knife to cut into 8 triangles; place on a cookie sheet (preferably lined with parchment paper), about 1 inch apart. Bake until golden, about 15 to 17 minutes. Cool for 5 minutes and serve warm or at room temperature. Cranberry-Orange Scones Follow the recipe for Simple Scones, adding a generous teaspoon of finely grated orange rind (zest) to the dry ingredients and substituting dried cranberries for the raisins. Lemon-Blueberry Scones Follow the recipe for Simple Scones, adding a generous teaspoon of finely grated lemon rind (zest) to the dry ingredients and substituting dried blueberries for the raisins. Cherry-Almond Scones Follow the recipe for Simple Scones, adding 1/2 tsp. almond extract to the sour cream mixture and substituting dried cherries for the raisins.
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What country do scones come from?

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Scotland/England
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Can you freeze scones and would you do it before or after baking?

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i make and freeze them all the time... you cook them 1st let them cool that wrap each school with cling warp they should last up to one month in the freezer other things u can freeze are cooked pancakes any muffins any cakes bannana bread.
Asked in Baking, Baking Powder, Scones

Do you have to use baking powder in scones?

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yes you should use baking powder in scones because that makes the scones rise when they bake.
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What can you put into scones?

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You can make many different kinds of scones including raisin, blueberry, chocolate chip, pumpkin and lemon, just to name a few. I have a very simple raisin scone recipe that is quite good. The ingredients include flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, salt, unsalted butter, raisins, sour cream, eggs.
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How do you make scones?

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Method Preheat oven to 220°C. Measure all your ingredients. Combine the self-raising flour and caster sugar in a medium bowl. Use your fingertips to rub in the butter until the mixture resembles fine breadcrumbs. To help incorporate some air into the mixture, keep the palms of your hands face-up as you lift the flour to rub in the butter. This will help make the scones lighter in texture. I have found that room-temperature butter gives a better result than chilled butter in scones. It is also easier to incorporate into the flour when at room temperature. Butter helps give the scones a tender texture as well as adding flavour. Add the milk all at once. Use a round- bladed knife to mix together using a cutting motion until evenly incorporated and the mixture begins to hold together. Do not over mix. Again, I have found that room-temperature milk is better to use in scones than milk straight from the fridge. The flour mixture needs less mixing to incorporate the room-temperature milk evenly, resulting in a lighter texture. The dough should be soft but not sticky. If it is a little dry, simply add a little more milk. Then bring dough together with your hands. Turn the dough onto a lightly floured surface and knead gently about 4-5 times with your hands, by pressing and then turning, until the dough is just smooth. It is important that you knead gently and don't handle the dough too much. If it is overworked, gluten in the flour will develop which will cause the scones to be tough in texture and heavy. Use a lightly floured rolling pin to roll out the dough until about 2cm thick. (Alternatively, you can flatten the dough with the palm of your hand). Then use a round 5cm pastry cutter to cut out the scones. Dip the cutter into the extra flour before cutting out each scone. Use a straight-down motion to cut out the scones. Do not twist the cutter as this will cause the scones to rise unevenly during cooking. You can re-roll any scraps and cut more scones; however, these will be slightly less tender than the scones cut from the original dough and will rise less evenly. As you cut out the scones, place them on a baking tray about 1cm apart. Placing them this close together will also help them rise evenly. I have found there is no need to grease or flour the tray. Sprinkle the tops of the scones with a little extra flour. Bake in preheated oven for 10-12 minutes or until golden and cooked through. The best way to tell if the scones are cooked is to tap the top of one with your fingertips - if it sounds hollow when tapped, they are ready. Alternatively, insert a skewer into a scone - if it comes out clean, they are ready. Remove the scones from the oven and immediately wrap them in a clean tea towel. Wrapping the scones will keep them warm and will give them a soft crust. Serve warm with lashings of butter or with jam and whipped or thick cream. Notes Variations: Wholemeal scones: Replace 150g (1 cup) of the self-raising flour with 160g (1 cup) wholemeal self-raising flour and add an extra tbs of milk. Continue as in the basic recipe. Herb scones: Add 2 tbs chopped fresh continental parsley, 2 tbs chopped fresh chives and 4 chopped green shallots to the flour mixture before adding the milk. Continue as in the basic recipe. Buttermilk brown sugar scones: Replace the caster sugar with brown sugar and replace the milk with buttermilk. Sprinkle the scones with a little extra brown sugar instead of the flour before baking. Continue as in the basic recipe. Cheddar scones: Leave out the caster sugar. Add 55g (1/2 cup) coarsely grated cheddar and 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper to the flour mixture before adding the milk. Sprinkle the scones with 25g (1/4 cup) extra grated cheddar instead of the flour before baking. Continue as in the basic recipe. Spiced currant scones: Combine 75g (1/2 cup) currants and 60mls (1/4 cup) water in a small saucepan and cook over low heat for 5 minutes or until all the liquid is absorbed. Set aside to cool for 5 minutes. Add 1 1/2 tsp mixed spice to the flour mixture before rubbing in the butter. Add the currants to the flour mixtue before adding the milk. Sprinkle the scones with a little sugar instead of flour before baking. Continue as in the basic recipe. With autumn upon us at Taste.com.au, we're turning to autumn recipes, savoury pie recipes and curry recipes.