US Presidents

The US President is the head of state and the head of the federal government of the United States of America. The president's power is checked and balanced by the two other branches of the US Government, which are Congress and the Supreme Court.

Asked in US Presidents, George W. Bush, George H. W. Bush

What is the religion of George W. Bush?

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He is a "born again" Christian, who is a member of the United Methodist Church. He is a long-time member of the Episcopal Church.
Asked in US Presidents, Barack Obama

Where did Barack Obama spend most of his life?

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He lived in Hawaii (where he was born) as a young boy; when his mother re-married, he spent four years of his childhood in Indonesia before returning to Hawaii. As an adult, he lived in California, New York, and Massachusetts, before moving to Chicago, Illinois after getting his law degree from Harvard in 1991. So, the two places he spent most of his life were Honolulu and Chicago.
Asked in US Presidents, India Government, Reserve Bank of India

Who is the current president of RBI?

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Duwuri Subbarao was appointed in 2008 and his term was extended to 2013.
Asked in US Presidents, John F. Kennedy

What is wrong with Robert Kennedy Jr's voice?

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Bobby Kennedy Jr. suffers from a rare but harmless voicebox disorder called "spasmotic dysphonia." It affects only about .02% of the population.
Asked in US Presidents, US in WW2, Japan, Nuclear Weapons

Who was President during World War 2 when a nuclear bomb was dropped on Japan?

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Harry S. Truman was President of the United States on August 6, 1945, when the first atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima, Japan.
Asked in US Presidents, George Washington

What did George Washington do?

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He was the 1st US President, from 1789 to 1797 and set many precedents concerning that office. Background: · Birth - February 22, 1732 in Westmoreland County, Virginia · Wife - Martha Dandridge Washington, a widow with children · Political Party - none ( later associated with Federalist in spirit ) · Vice President - John Adams · 1st president · Height: 6 feet 1.5 inches · Age at Inauguration: 57 years old Careers: · A self-taught Surveyor, beginning at age 16 when living with his older brother in Virginia First Surbeyor to cross the Blue Ridge Mountains in Virginia · Farmer, Distiller, Land speculator, Politician · Statesman Sent to Ohio in charge of troops in The French and Indian War-- he lost that first battle and swore he'd never fight again, though he admitted he enjoyed the sounds of war  Recruited to be Commander in Chief of Continental Army during the American Revolution and not only conducted the military campaigns that won the war, but constantly had to work to get the colonial governments to supply men and material for his army. Almost froze to death. Government Positions: · Member of Virginia House of Burgesses, 1759-74 · Member of Continental Congress, 1774-75 · Chairman of the Constitutional Convention, 1787-88 · President of USA 1789-1797 Honors and Statistics · A 60-foot (18 m) sculpture of his head is carved into Mount Rushmore · Death - George Washington died on December 14, 1799 in Mount Vernon, Virginia · Age when he died - 67 · He suffered from: malaria, smallpox, tuberculosis, dysentery and pneumonia · He was one of the richest men in America · Died of a simple throat infection Major accomplishments · Bill of Rights (1791) · American Revolution (1775 - 1783) Commander-in-chief of the victorious army · Constitution of the USA (1787) Served as the first President · Whiskey Rebellion (1794) Revered and Honored to this day. George Washington was the first president of the United States of America. You can see him on a one dollar bill in America. He was elected president for the Constitutional Convention on May 25,1787. he looks after his place his country he is a president. he was kind to soldiers
Asked in US Presidents

Who was the 2nd President of the US?

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John Adams (1735-1826) was the second President of the United States. He was previously the Vice President to George Washington, the first President of the US. John Adams was a Federalist and he served as President from March 4, 1797 to March 4, 1801. Under his Presidency, Thomas Jefferson served as Vice president and went on to become the 3rd president of the US. Adams also played one of the leading roles in the adoption of the Declaration of Independence and also was a signer of the document. Adams fought for separation from Great Britain and under his term, congress established the departments of the Navy and the Marine corps. Adams was elected vice president in 1789 and was re-elected vice president in 1792 then was elected president in 1796, where he served only one term. Adams died July 4, 1826. Adams was married in 1764, to Abigail Smith and they had a son John Quincy Adams, who later became the 6th president of the United States. Some may not know that John Adams was the first president to live in what is now known as The White House.
Asked in US Presidents

What US presidents were never married?

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James Buchanan (15th President, 1857-1861) was the only president who never married. He is also the only president from Pennsylvania.
Asked in US Presidents, US Government, Andrew Johnson

Why was Andrew Johnson impeached?

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The main official reason was his violation of a tenure in office law which he was charged with breaking when he fired his Secretary of War, Edward Stanton. There were a lot of people in Congress that wanted him out of office and were looking for some reason to get him out. He was unpopular because, like Lincoln , he did not want to punish the defeated southern states, but rather to take them back into the union as seamlessly as possible. He was a converted Democrat and from a slave state, Tennessee, and so had no natural power base to work in his favor. President Johnson was primarily impeached for 1) violating the 1867 Tenure of Office Act. Other charges included 2) violating the Command of the Army Act and 3) libeling Congress with "inflammatory and scandalous harangues." Explanation The Tenure of Office Act prohibited the President from firing any official who had been placed in office with the "advice and consent" of the Senate unless the Senate also approved the removal. President Johnson wanted to replace Secretary of War, Edwin M. Stanton, whom Lincoln had appointed Secretary of War in 1862. Stanton had informed the President that the military chain of command had been changed, and that the Southern military leaders would henceforth answer only to Congress, and not the President. In August 1867, Johnson responded by attempting to fire Stanton and replace him with Ulysses S. Grant, but the Senate supported Stanton and refused to confirm Grant's appointment and reinstated Stanton against the President's wishes. In February 1868, Johnson appointed Lorenzo Thomas as the new Secretary of War and ordered the Southern military leaders to report directly to him. Stanton refused to step down, instead barricading himself in his office where he lived for three days until the House of Representatives brought eleven Articles of impeachment against Andrew Johnson for "high crimes and misdemeanors," among them violating the Tenure of Office Act in defiance of the Senate. Johnson was impeached by a vote of 126-47 on February 24, 1868, but was acquitted by a single vote (35-19) at the conclusion of his Senate removal trial on May 16, 1868. Johnson completed his Presidential term and left office March 4, 1869. He was succeeded by Ulysses S. Grant. For more information, see Related Questions, below. The U.S. House of Representatives votes 11 articles of impeachment against President Andrew Johnson, nine of which cite Johnson's removal of Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton, a violation of the Tenure of Office Act. The House vote made President Johnson the first president to be impeached in U.S. history.
Asked in US Presidents, United Nations

How much does Ban-Ki Moon earn in one year?

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The Secretary General's salary is $227,253. This amount is determined by the General Assembly. He also receives a budget for personal entertainment as well as free housing and security protection? To compare, George H.W. Bush earned nearly $400,000 as President of the US.
Asked in US Presidents, US Constitution, US Government

Who presides over the impeachment trial of a US President?

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The Chief Justice of the Supreme Court (real title: Chief Justice of the United States) presides over the Senate impeachment trial. Explanation: Impeachment is a two-step process; the impeachment phase is similar to a Grand Jury hearing, where charges (called "articles of impeachment") are presented and the House of Representatives determines whether the evidence is sufficient to warrant a trial. If the House vote passes by a simple majority, the defendant is "impeached," and proceeds to trial in the Senate. The Senate trial, while analogous to a criminal trial, only convenes for the purpose of determining whether a Justice, the President (or another officeholder) should be removed from office on the basis of the evidence presented at impeachment. At the trial a committee from the House of Representatives, called "Managers," act as the prosecutor. Per constitutional mandate (Article I, Section 3), the Chief Justice of the United States(Supreme Court) must preside over the Senate trial of the President. If any other government official is being tried, an "Impeachment Trial Committee" of Senators act as the presiding judges. This procedure came into practice in the 1980s, with the passage of Senate Rule XII. At the conclusion of the trial, the full Senate votes and must return a two-thirds Super Majority for conviction. Convicted Presidents (and other officials) are removed from office immediately and barred from holding future office. If the President is acquitted, he continues to serve out his current term, and may be eligible for reelection if term limits permit. For more information, see Related Questions, below. (One must realize that the impeachment proceedings actually occur in the House of Representatives which is presided over by the House speaker. If an impeachment bill passes, the Senate holds a trial which is the result of the impeachment, but is not really impeachment.) The senate.
Asked in US Presidents, Franklin D. Roosevelt

Did Franklin D. Roosevelt cheat on Eleanor?

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Yes. There is little question that FDR was unfaithful to his wife, Eleanor.
Asked in US Presidents

How much surplus did President Clinton leave?

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According to Factcheck.org and other similar sites, President Clinton left office with a huge budget surplus: the amount was $1.9 billion in fiscal 1999, and then, $86.4 billion in fiscal 2000. In fact, the last three years of his presidency, the government regularly took in more money than it spent.
Asked in US Presidents, Illinois, US Senators and Representatives

Who is the senator from Illinois now?

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The 2 senators from IL are Richard Durbin and Mark Kirk
Asked in US Presidents, John F. Kennedy

Where is archaic diction in John F. Kennedy inaugural address?

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Archaic diction: old-fashioned or outdated choice of words "... beliefs for which our forebears fought..." -JFK
Asked in US Presidents, Companies

What is a higher rank CEO or president?

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In the US government the President is higher, but in a company the CEO is the highest. In order to clarify this it should be noted that the office of CEO does not exist in the US Government. Also, in the business world a person can be both the CEO, Chief Executive Officer and President.
Asked in US Presidents, US Constitution, U.S. Electoral College

What are the disadvantages of the US electoral college system?

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The aspects of the system that some people object to are (1) the fact that a person can win the popular vote but lose the election , (2) the 'winner-take-all" method used by most states to cast their electoral vote. and (3) the way in which the electoral votes are divided among the states. These objections and the ways to try to fix are all quite debatable. Below are some more opinions. ======================================================== A major problem is Plurality. A number of votes cast for a candidate that is greater than the number of votes for any other candidate but not necessarily a majority For ex, a 40% vote can win and the person can become pres The electoral college is often considered to be an outdated system of popular voting. It requires a state population to select electors to vote for the popular candidate. Electors represent a group of people in the population of the state. The higher the population a state has, the more electors it is allocated to send. In most cases, it is not representative of the United States population as a whole, but rather a handful of critically important "battleground states". These states include Texas, Florida, California, and New York. Once a presidential candidate secures most of these states, he/she is almost guaranteed a win as these states have the highest population. In most elections, smaller states are given a less important voice in the subject matter as they are usually unconsidered by candidates running for president. In an example, the 2000 Presidential Election of the United States was one of four that did not reflect the popular vote. There was much controversy over the results of the election. However, such instances do not occur for every single election. 1.Popular vote does not always determine the winner of an election. 2.Larger "swing" states receive the most attention 3.Discourages third parties 4.Discourages voter turnout 5.Favors the smaller less populous states
Asked in History of the United States, Politics and Government, US Presidents

Who becomes president if the president dies?

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If the president Obama dies then Joe Biden is the president. See if the president dies then the vice president will be president. The answer depends on the country/organization. In the case of the President of the United States, the Vice President becomes president if the president dies or resigns. In some countries the Vice President becomes acting president. In other countries a new election must be held, or a new president appointed. In other countries, the Speaker of the House of elected representatives becomes president. If the President of the United States dies, or is unable to perform his duties, the Vice President becomes President for the remainder of the current term. Quick Answer: The Vice President of the United States is the first person in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president, should he or she accept the position. Upon ascendancy to the office of President, the former Vice President-now-President must nominate a new Vice President as per Section 2 of the 25th Amendment ratified in 1967, " Whenever there is a vacancy in the office of the Vice President, the President shall nominate a Vice President who shall take office upon confirmation by a majority vote of both Houses of Congress." If however only the Vice President dies while in office or is unable to fulfill the duties of the office, the President remains the President and appoints another Vice President. If both the President and the Vice-President die or cannot fulfill their duties the Speaker of the House of Representatives becomes President.
Asked in History of the United States, US Presidents, US Constitution

What are characteristics of vice president?

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Vice presidents will become president if anything happens to the president (sometime described as a heartbeat away from the presidency.) So, they need all the qualifications of a president, at least in theory. In practice, until Eisenhower made a special point to give VP Nixon responsibility, vice-presidents were essentially useless unless the president died. The only official duty of the VP is to preside over Senate debate and to vote if there is a tie vote- not very likely to be important, since the Senate can delay a vote if the VP could really make a difference. The VP candidate was often chosen to balance off the presidential candidate in hopes of picking up votes from people not likely to vote for the presidential candidate. For example, Lyndon Johnson, a powerful Texas Senator was added to the Kennedy ticket. Andrew Johnson, from Tennessee, once a slave state, was added to the Lincoln ticket.
Asked in Coins and Paper Money, US Presidents, US Banknotes

Which president is on the face of a US five dollar bill?

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The 16th President, Abraham Lincoln appears on the front of the five dollar bill. Without trying to be too snarky, you could have saved yourself time and hassle by simply taking the bill and moving your eyes very carefully to the bottom of the portrait. It says "Lincoln", right there underneath his picture. == == The Lincoln Memorial is on the back. It also has a caption identifying it.
Asked in Politics and Government, US Presidents, US Constitution

What were two key elements of the Madisonian model?

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To keep most of the power outside of the majority and to separate the power into different institutions.
Asked in US Presidents, US Senators and Representatives, US Vice Presidents

Does the president of the Senate have a vote in the Senate?

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The President of the Senate in the United States is also the Vice President of the US. He is allowed to vote only when a particular Senate vote is tied. He is not a senator. He is not allowed to vote to create a tie. There is also a president pro tempore of the Senate. He is a senator who is elected by the Senate. He votes in the Senate like every other senator.
Asked in History of the United States, US Presidents

What were Thomas Jefferson's two most notable achievements as president of the US?

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Two notable achievements of Jefferson's administration were the purchase of the Louisianna Territory from France and the ending of tribute to the Barbary Pirates.
Asked in Politics and Government, US Presidents, US Constitution

How is the number of electoral votes determined for each state?

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Electoral votes in the Electoral College determine the President of the United States. Every state and DC are awarded a certain number of electoral votes with which to elect the President. Each state has electoral votes equal to the total of the 2 representative the state has in the U.S. Senate plus the number of representative the state has in the House of Representatives.