WW1 Homefront

WW1 home front refers to the activities of the civilians during WW1. The governments of affected countries required their civilians to assist in the war effort. In the U.S., up to 30,000 women worked on the front.

1,450 Questions
World War 2
WW1 Homefront

Is there a list of military cross winners?

YES

507508509
World War 1
Veterans Affairs and Issues
WW1 Homefront

How many World War I Veterans are still alive?

In 2010, only a handful of WW1 veterans were still alive. By early 2012, they were all deceased.

In early 2012, the last person serving in any armed service during WW1 passed away. The last combat veteran of WW1 died in 2011.

Florence Green (nee Patterson), who joined the Women's RAF at age 17 in 1918, was the last surviving armed forces member. She died on February 4, 2012, two weeks before her 111th birthday (born February 19, 1901).

363364365
Politics and Government
WW1 Homefront
US Foreign Policy

Why is foreign policy so important?

The world is increasingly inter-connected or "globalized" as some might say. We are no longer a handful of individual states. In large part we rely on one another for both economic and military support. How the rest of the world views one state is very important. Harsh foreign policy is often coupled with military action or economic embargoes. One might suggest that we shouldn't be complicated with foreign policy and not deal with the complications of other countries and become isolationist. What these people don't realize is that the very act of becoming isolationist is in fact foreign policy.

305306307
World War 2
Vietnam War
History of the United States
WW1 Homefront

How many Americans died in Vietnam War?

60,000

262728
WW1 Trench Warfare
WW1 Naval Warfare
WW1 Homefront

What does BRAT stand for in World War 1?

hecticNerves

hecticCease

259260261
World War 1
WW1 Homefront

Did American Progressives favor world war 1?

initially the progressives believed that the war was violent and uncivilized but by the time the United States joined the war, they had realized that the war was filled with many opportunities for American society.

183184185
World War 1
WW1 Homefront

Why was DORA introduced in ww1?

> to prevent people spying on the British military and naval operations

>to protect Britain from the threat of a foreign invasion

>to increase the production of weapons and war materials

>to make sure there was a sufficient amount of food for the British population

C.T was here :)

127128129
World War 1
WW1 Homefront

Who was Austria's biggest ally?

Germany

103104105
Cold and Flu
Military Medicine
WW1 Homefront

How did wartime conditions help spread the Spanish flu?

Wartime conditions are attributed partly as the reasons for the spread of the Spanish Flu in 1918 during WW1, causing it to be a pandemic that killed millions world wide. Soldiers were moving from home front to battle field and then home again taking the influenza virus with them around the globe during the war. It is believed to have started in the US and then spread. The conditions of men in foxholes, closely packed in transport and in barracks helped the virus spread due to their close proximities. The physical and mental stress of war, poor nutrition, lack of sleep and bacterial infections from wounds can contribute to cause the immune systems of the troops to be overwhelmed and at less than peak functioning.

105106107
World War 2
World War 1
WW1 Homefront

What was the attitude of people toward World War l?

they hated it at the end, but were pumped in the beginning

102103104
History, Politics & Society
World War 2
Britain in WW2
WW1 Homefront

What was life like for women after world war 2?

For many women the years from 1945 till the early 1960s were extremely frustrating. In World War 2 women's labour had been valued. Many had been paid well, and some had had highly responsible jobs. When the war was over they came under enormous pressure to go back to the home and be housewives and mothers ... The pressure to conform was very great. Women's Liberation didn't emerge as a movement till the 1960s. Joncey

101102103
WW1 Homefront
Decade - 1920s

How did the hardships of World War 1 affect Australian fashion in the 1920's?

The hardships of world war one affected Australian fashion for women especially. Due to their participatin in world war one it gave them independence, and confidence knowing that they can work equally as the men. The women in the 1920's were very different from a decade ago, and it was not only shown in their fashion but also in their social life and activites as well. There outfits became more "radical" and shorter and their new form of independence was seen. Their social life also changed as the women started to smoke and drink in public and wear there new outfits which not only showed them to be of a higher social standing but also gave the women of this decade more confidence and freedom.

and thay wanted to be treated as equals.so thay took on more maskline jods.

99100101
World War 1
Australia in WW2
WW1 Homefront

What was the Australian homefront?

The Australian Home Front, or any Home Front for that matter refers to the efforts of civilians and servicepersonnel during a war that takes place within their home country. This can include internal propaganda, manufacturing, agriculture, war bonds etc. It needn't be military, for example one of the big issues faced by women in the Australian Home Front is that of fraternisation with American servicemen. This caused upset amongst Australian men as they believed the Americans had an unfair advantage given they were paid much better wages, so could spend more money on a date. I believe they use the term Front, because they wish to make reference to the fact that even if you weren't on a fighting Front like the Western Front in WWI, you were still assisting in the overall war effort, even if it was though something simple like using less electricity, or recycling paper. So in answer to your question the Australian Home Front in this context refers simply to the day to day activities that took on the Australian mainland during the second World War.

969798
World War 1
WW2 Homefront
WW1 Homefront

How was the home front organized during the world war 1?

kiss my but

737475
World War 1
WW1 Homefront

How many Americans died in World War 1?

about 120, 000

636465
Iraq War
Iraq
WW1 Homefront
Gas Prices

How has the war in Iraq affected America so far?

Look at the gas prices, really if you see price gouging going on, there the answer! Keo

707172
WW1 Trench Warfare
WW1 Naval Warfare
WW1 Homefront

What was the consequences of the battle of the somme?

there were 57,000 casualties on the first day, about a third of them were killed. it was the worst in the history of British army. There was no order to prepare the soldiers for the situation they found themselves in. The British casualties were around 420,000, the French around 200,000 and the Germans around 500,000

697071
World War 2
Britain in WW2
WW1 Homefront

What was life like for women working during World War 2 and what jobs did they do?

Hi Jamie Life for women during WW2 was bittersweet. Their loved ones were at war, yet they discovered they were able to hold down men's jobs (which was foreign to them during these times). AMERICAN WOMEN IN WW2 More than 60,000 Army nurses served stateside and overseas during WWII. 67 Army nurses were captured by the Japanese in the Philippines in 1942 and were held as POWs for over 2 1/2 years. The Army established a Women's Army Auxiliary Corps (WAC) in 1943. The Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP) were organized and flew as civil service pilots. WASPs flew stateside missions as ferriers, test pilots, and anti-aircraft artillery trainers. More than 14,000 Navy nurses served stateside, overseas on hospital ships and as flight nurses during the war. 5 Navy nurses were captured by the Japanese on the Island of Guam and were held as POWs for 5 months before being exchanged. A 2nd group of 11 Navy nurses captured in the Philippines were held for 37 months. The Navy recruited women into its Navy Women's Service (WAVES) starting in 1942. Before the war was over, more than 80,000 WAVES filled shore billets in a large variety of jobs in communications, intelligence, supply, medicine and administration. The Marine Corps created the Marine Corps Women's Reserve in 1943. Marine women served stateside as clerks, cooks, mechanics, drivers, etc. The Coast Guard established their Women's Reserve known as the SPARs (after the motto Semper Paratus-Always Ready) in 1942. SPARs were assigned stateside and served as storekeepers, clerks, photographers, pharmacists mates, cooks, etc. The Cadet Nurse Corps, established in 1943 trained some 125,000 women for possible military service. More than 400,000 American military women served at home and overseas in nearly all noncombat jobs. The nickname given to women factory workers was "Rosie The Riveter." This term is dedicated to all races of women during that served in some way during WW2. Once the war was over and the men came home, women were basically told to go home and do their "wifely duties" much to the dismay of these brave and hard-working young women. CANADIAN WOMEN IN WW2 Whether serving overseas, or keeping "the homefires burning" Cdn. women did their part during WWII. They were not given the option to enlist for combat duty, but many served in other areas. 45,000 Cdn. women enlisted in the Women's Div. of the Royal Cdn. Air Force, as well as the Women's Royal Cdn. Naval Service and the Cdn. Women's Army Corp. July 1941, the Women Div. of the RCAF was authorized by the gov't. Thousands of young women flocked to recruiting offices to enlist. By 1945, 17,000 women were in the Cdn. Armed Forces. Hundreds of Cdn. women worked in machine shops, welding shops, and manufacturing plants, making the equipment that was necessary to fight a war. Manpower was at a premium and fuses, guns and shells were urgently needed. Women were strained to the max, working hard to fill men's jobs and also cleaning their homes and looking after their children. Luxuries (like the American women) were few. Only 1 in 9 of the 45,000 women who signed up were selected for duty overseas. As the war progressed women began to be assigned to clerical and other duties in the combat zone. In 1945 when the war ended there were 2,000 CWAC's overseas. Women wanted to be shipped overseas. Just like the men, they had a yearning for adventure. Once they arrived the reality of the dangers became evident. Aug. 13/41, the Cdn. Women's Auxillary was established and took over jobs as clerks, vehicle driver, messangers and canteen workers and only being paid 2/3 of the men's wages. July 31 1942 the Women's Royal Naval Serve was established. The navy wouldn't look at a woman who didn't have excellent references. The active role of women in war was not a new concept. Many didn't feel that women were suited for military life, but soon realized, "what would we have done without them!" Cdn. nurses became the first in the world to achieve officer status in May, 1942 and had close contact with Cdn military operations overseas. While serving in the military during WWII women did everything the men did. After the war many wanted to carry on their military careers. Those at home wished to continue working in the jobs that they had become comfortable in. Women had tasted freedom. In the 50s and 60s women continued to enter the workforce and the world would never be the same.

697071
World War 2
WW1 Homefront
Population

What was women's involvement in World War 2?

At the start of world war two women were conscripted into war work. Alot of women worked in the munition factories others worked in the land army producing crops. W.A.A.F (womens auxiliary air force) which had over 180,000 members in the war.

676869
World War 2
US Civil War
World War 1
WW1 Homefront

What were the political and social effects of World War 1 on the US?

Socially I think that the great migration had a big effect on African Americans. African Americans migrated to escape the widespread racism of the South, to seek out employment opportunities in urban environments, and to pursue what was widely perceived to be a "better life" in the North {in other words African Americans drifted from the South to the north not only to get away from Jim Crow laws but to also get better job opportunities}. Also a boll weevil infestation that had destroyed many African Americans crops in the south made it hard for blacks to provide money and with out income there was no way to feed there families so hundreds of thousands of African Americans packed up there life's and headed up north.

Packed up THEIR LIVES. Back to 1st grade for you.

596061
US Civil War
War and Military History
WW1 Homefront

What political economic technological and social changes were caused by the Civil War?

The most obvious thing is that slavery was ended and the freed slaves became citizens of the United States.

575859
US Civil War
Slavery
WW1 Homefront

What problems developed on the Confederate home front during the war?

Slaves, having heard about the Emancipation Proclomation, began to become restless in anticipation of the arrival of Federal troops.

131415
World War 2
Britain in WW2
WW1 Homefront

What was life like in Britain in the years immediately after World War Two?

The basic characterising word would be "Austerity" Rationing was not brought to and end by the war finishing, and some items remained on ration until 1954. The railways and industries were worn out and consumer goods were hard to come by as much that was produced had to be exported, in a drive to pay off war debts and stabilise the economy. The BBC2 "People's war" site may be of help: http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/ww2/A2082584 for example, looking at Christmas 1945. The Festival of Britain in 1951 has been noted as a mark of the recovery of spirit and colour in post-war Britain, but there was argument at the time as to whether it was a frivolous waste of scarce resources better dedicated to rebuilding damaged cities.

555657
WW1 Homefront

What is it called when neither side can gain the advantage during war?

A stalemate

535455
World War 1
WW1 Homefront

What did they call the Germans in World War 1?

krauts...after the sauerkraut that German soldiers commonly ate

495051

Copyright © 2020 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.