Zoroastrianism

Based on the teachings of prophet Zoroaster, Zoroastrianism is monotheistic religion with a majority of adherents in India. As of 2004, there are between 145,000 and 210,000 Zoroastrians in the world.

917 Questions
Religion & Spirituality
Zoroastrianism

Is Zoroastrian teaching still relevant today?

If you say "relevant" and mean true, than no. But if you mean "relevant" as a currently-surviving religion, than yes. There are around 200,000 Zoroastrians in the world today. They still practice fire rituals as well. Thus it is quite difficult to be a practicing Zoroastrian today.

265266267
New Testament
Jesus Christ
Zoroastrianism

How far did the three Wise men travel to find the baby Jesus?

That is uncertain, it is also unlikely there were only three (the number comes from the number of gifts not the number of men), however it is most likely they were priests of the Zoroastrian religion so they most likely traveled from somewhere in Persia.

179180181
Judaism
Zoroastrianism

Which religion is older - Zoroastrianism or Judaism?

Zoroastrianism was founded in southern Russia sometime before 1700 BCE and possibly even before 2000 BCE. Monotheistic Judaism is believed to have begun in Judah during the seventh-century-BCE reign of King Josiah, although worship of Yahweh as the national God probably goes back before 1000 BCE.

Either way, Zoroastrianism is far older than Judaism.

163164165
Zoroastrianism

Is considered the sacred text and holy scriptures of Zoroastrianism?

Zend Avesta

145146147
Ancient Religions
Zoroastrianism

If you practice Zoroastrianism what are you called?

A Zoroastrian

123124125
Ancient Religions
Zoroastrianism

How did Zoroastrianism influence other religions?

They where the only monotheistic religion at that time. That means that they only belived in one god.

103104105
Religion & Spirituality
Ancient Religions
Comparative Religions and Denominations
Zoroastrianism

Where did the religion zoroastrianism originate?

Zoroastrianism originated in Persia (today - Iran) before 6th century BCE.

103104105
Zoroastrianism

What events led to the development of Zoroastrianism?

The events that led up to the development of Zoroastrianism...

-people of the Fertile Crescent had endured many hardships, including war, conquest, and famine

-they began to question

Why so much suffering and chaos should exist in the world?

-The prophet Zoroaster taught the teaching that earth is a battleground where a great struggle is taking place between the spirit of good and the spirit of evil

-according to his teaching, every person plays a role in this fight

-they believe in one god; Ahura Mazda

939495
Judaism
Zoroastrianism
Heaven and Hell

Why do Jews believe bad things happen?

Jews believe that evil exists in the world to create free choice and that God is ultimately responsible for the presence of evil as one of the safeguards to free will. To a certain degree, evil is viewed as a question of punishment for bad choices, the bad choices of other people, tests, and questions of perception (e.g. something is evil because of your point of view).

Unlike Christianity and Islam, Judaism does not ascribe evil to a devil or the Satan and the Satan is viewed a loyal follower of God, who happens to be the loyal opposition.

495051
Zoroastrianism

In Zoroastrianism what represented darkness and evil?

In the early stages of the religion, the cosmic dualism that was canonized at the time of the Arsacid parthians and Sassanid Persians was absent. The main dichotomy seemed to have bene between Asha (righteousness and truth) and Drugh or Druj (lie).

The content of the Gathas however (being the oldest part of the Avesta and comprising the original work of Zarathushtra) remain unclear due to the difficulty of the Avestan language and its remote antiquity. Various translators have argued for dualistic, monotheistic and even patheistic tendencies. This ambiguity perhaps reflects the early stage of Zoroastrianism prior to its canonization in later times. Arguments in favor of all can certainly be made.

Most translators and scholars however agree that the earlier stages of Zoroastrianism seem more concerned with an ethical dualism represented by a personal inner struggle to overcome the negative aspects of the self. That still remains unclear however as various deities or "angels", assigned to oversee creation and lead the righteous to salvation and enlightenment are antagonized by their "opposite numbers" whose sources does not stem from Ahura Mazda and their origin remains unclear.

The cosmic dualism that was later assigned to Zoroastrianism from foreign travellers, observers and historians in ancient times ranging from Greeks, Armenians, Syrians and Romans, evolved sometime in late Achamenid times and possibly in the Seleucid period. Some believe that Babylonian religion had a deep impact on the development of the cosmic dualism that saw the universe as a battleground between forces of light and darkness, manifested at every level of creation down to the most primitive lifeforms.

Dualism however is present in the Gathas though not as pervasive as in the Younger Avesta. One is constantly reminded by Zarathushtra of the right path as opposed to the wrong one; of the bliss of paradise of house of song as opposed to abode of darkness; of the benevolent immortals and lords (Asuras) as opposed to the bad divinities (Daevas); of the good farmer as opposed to the bad nomad who plunders and wages war.

Whereas early Zoroastrianism saw Ahura Mazda as uncontested and the dichotomy being between Spenta Maynu and Angra Maynu, later centuries saw the evolution into a full scale battle between Ahura Mazda's creation and assistants and Angra Maynu's miscreations.

To resolve the issue of dualism, various sects later evolved and tried to resolve the issue of dualism by assigning to Zurvan-immortal time- the origin of both light and dark, good and evil. One sect, known as the Gayomardian saw evil as arising from Ahura Mazda or Yazdan (God)' s own self-doubt and thus again assigned to the same source the origin of light and dark.

858687
Zoroastrianism

What are people who believe in zoroastrianism called?

zoroastrians

808182
Philosophy and Philosophers
Zoroastrianism
Friedrich Nietzsche

Did Friedrich Nietzsche agree with Hitler?

There is no doubt that Hitler and many of his fellow Nazi's found a hero in Nietzsche. The philosophers preference for wars is clear. Hitler was a frequent visitor to the Nietzsche museum and was an avid reader of the German philosopher. In particular, Nietzsche's hope for a coming "elite" to rule the world fit nicely in Hitler's ideas. Now, as to what would Nietzsche would think of much of Hitler's politics of war, we do not know. As for anti-semitism, many Europeans had that in their bones, most prominently Martin Luther.

But, if there were no such people as Jews, it would not have changed Hitler's views of world conquest.

596061
Religion & Spirituality
Zoroastrianism

When did zoroastrianism begin?

Zoroaster founded the religion that bears his name. There is no consensus on when Zoroaster lived. Both his birthplace and the dates of his lifetime are unknown, with opinions ranging from around 550 BCE, to around 1000 BCE, with others stating that he lived prior to 1300 BCE, or as early as 1700 BCE.

383940
Judaism
Zoroastrianism

What are some similarities between Judaism and Zoroastrianism?

It is not an easy task to find similarities between two faiths that are quite different, and almost polar opposites of each other.

Judaism does not recognize any duality within God, except for God's aspects of justice and mercy. (There is no evil god within Judaism, and the character of Satan has no magic powers whatsoever. He is merely a sounding board in some biblical narratives).

Another answer:
There are many similarities between Judaism and Zoroastrianism: they are both monotheistic, believe in angels, and so on. They also have different scriptures and different histories. Judaism accepts Satan to be the loyal assistant of God with the role of testing the righteousness of people, while Zoroastrianism says that Angra Mainyu is an evil adversary. Judaism looks forward to the arrival of the messiah (who is a mortal man with nothing supernatural about him), but Zoroastrianism teaches that the coming savior, the Saoshyant, will be born of a virgin and lead humanity in the last battle against evil.
There are many striking similarities and many differences between Judaism and Zoroastrianism. Of course, the key differences are that Judaism is the religion of the Jews and their deity is God, while Zoroastrianism is the old religion of the Iranian people (most notably Persians and Medes) and their deity is Ahura Mazda ("Wise Lord"). Traditionally, Zoroastrians could neither burn nor bury the dead, because the soil and fire are both sacred; instead, they exposed the bodies of the dead, so that vultures could dispose of them without defiling the elements. The Jews went through a phase when the dead were exposed, but this was only to allow the flesh to rot, after which the bones were stored in an ossuary.

  • Answer:
Judaism has always been monotheistic. Even at the height of the unfortunate spread of idolatry among the less-loyal Ten Tribes, there were thousands who remained loyal to God (1 Kings 19:18).

The Zoroastrians, however, believed in two gods, not one. The Jewish Sages who collated the Talmud in the early centuries of the Common Era lived in Babylonia, witnessed the practices of the Zoroastrians, and recorded this fact (Talmud, Sanhedrin 39a). In addition, Zoroastrianism is unlike Judaism in that:

  • its deity is not immanent
  • it believes in worship through intermediaries, who are themselves "worthy of worship"
  • evil has its own creator, Angra Mainyu or Ahriman, which had always existed
  • some of its adherents believe in a self-creating universe
  • some modern scholars see it as a form of pantheism
  • it has "fire-temples," with worship in the presence of flame
  • its adherents are not required to marry within their faith
  • some Zoroastrians dispose of their dead through ritual exposure to the open sky, while some others cremate the dead
  • dogs are considered sacred
  • such creatures as snakes, ants and flies were "not created by the creator of good"
  • it includes a virgin birth, in which its messiah will be conceived without sexual penetration.
333435
Judaism
Ancient Religions
Zoroastrianism

Is the Jewish religion older than the Zoroastrian religion?

It is difficult to say. Judaism was heavily influenced by Zoroastrianism and the concept of final judgment, heaven and hell, the arch-angels, the concept of an ethnical-uiversal God as opposed to a tribal one came from Zoroastrianism.
The general concensus on Zoroastrianism presently is that it is between 3,300 and 3,400 years old. Some say 3,700 but that is unlikely. Most scholars believe on 3,000-3,500 range.
These dates are based on linguistic evidence and archeology and not the usual Greek anachronism which often corrupts historical fact.
Judaism on the other hand goes back to Moses and not Abraham so around 3,300-3,400 years at the most. It is possible that they are contemporary. Answer: Zoroastrianism and Vedic Hinduism are contemporaries and among the oldest organised religious systems on earth.

  • Answer:
The date of what time Zoroaster lived and when the Old Avestan Gathas were composed cannot be declared with certainty. Commonly quoted dates are: either around 600 BCE, or at an undetermined time in the second millennium BCE.
Judaism was founded by Abraham shortly after his birth in 1812 BCE.
Judaism borrowed nothing from Zoroastrianism. Any similarities are because certain basic concepts go back to the original Noahide teachings.
The dualism in Zoroastrianism is repudiated repeatedly in the Talmud.
535455
Zoroastrianism

What is zoroastrianism method of reaching salvation?

Zoroastrianism is not a strong believer in reaching salvation. They much prefer doing good deeds. acts, and living "good"

697071
Comparative Religions and Denominations
Zoroastrianism

Who brought Zoroastrianism into India?

Zoroastrianism was in India at the time of the Achamenids and possibly before. Ancient texts mention the Kambojas, a tribal people who lived in the region of Taxila (Takshashila) and practiced Zoroastrianism. their presence was noted well into the time of the Gupta Empire and they lived side by side with Hindus, Buddhists and others.

Successive waves of Zoroastrians came to the Subcontinent at various times in history, mostly as merchants from the Zoroastrian Iranian lands of Soghdia, Bactria and the Parthian-Persian Empires. They lived and traded there mostly in the cities of Northern India.

After the conquest of Persia and Iranian Central Asia by Arab-Islamic armies, Zoroastrianism was frequently suppressed and relegated to second-class status by Islamic authorites and shari'a law. Lack of opportunities and equal rights and heavy Jyzzya taxation imposed on non mohammedans, and sporadic outbreaks of violence against Zoroastrians by mohammedans prompted many to seek welcome in lands where they could practice their religion freely and on equal footing with the rest of the population.

In the 10th century, a group of Zoroastrians departed from Khorassan, the region adjoining Iran, Turkmenistan and Afghanistan and landed in northwestern India and evenutally settled in Gujarat.

Successive waves arrived subsequent to the 10th century migration from Khorasan from various parts of the former Sassanian Persian Empire. Some migrants from Tabarestan (the modern region of Mazandaran in northern Iran) founded Now-Sari (New Sari) in honor of their former home.

Over the course of the next few centuries, more Zoroastrians arrived from Iran and Afghanistan, especially after the brutal rule of the Saffavids who sought to wipe out Zoroastrianism from Persia. Waves of migrants continued to arrive until the time of the Qajars. These latecomers are known as "Iranis" whereas the people descended from earlier times are known as "Parsis".

626364
Christianity
Comparative Religions and Denominations
Paganism
Zoroastrianism

How does Zoroastrianism differ from pagan beliefs?

Paganism is generally polytheistic, involving many gods, spirits, etc. Zoroastrianism is what is called a dualistic religion. It features two deities, one good (Ahura-Mazda) and one evil (Ahriman) who are considered to be equally powerful (unlike the Christian version in which, although there is a God and a devil, it is not an equal contest; God rules the universe and the devil just makes trouble, supposedly).

575859
Religion & Spirituality
Zoroastrianism

Why is Zoroastrianism considered a highly moralistic religion?

I believe it was highly moralistic because the followers of Zoroastrianism believed that if 'you were a honest and moral indivisual you would enter a heavenly paradise' during the afterlife. They also believed that if 'you did something bad, demons would fling their evil brethen into a hellish realm of pain and suffering.'

535455
Ancient Religions
Zoroastrianism

What is the name of an Iranian Sect practising a modern version of Zoroastrianism?

There is no 'modern version' of Zoroastrianism, it si still being practised as a religon even now.

535455
Jesus Christ
Zoroastrianism

Was Jesus influenced by Zoroastrianism?

He was not. He is the Son of God, and together with his heavenly Father created all things and all men, including Zoroaster, and so the creator is not influenced by his creation. Rather it should be the other way around

515253
Islam
Animal Life
Zoroastrianism

What makes Muslims a Muslim?

The testimony of faith a.k.a. the shahada or the kalima, which is to testify that:

"None has the right to be worshipped except Allaah and Muhammad is the slave and Messenger of Allaah."

This is the first pillar of the five pillars of Islaam. One must believe this statement with sincerity, truthfulness, compliance, acceptance and act upon what it entails i.e. not to associate partners with Allaah in any act of worship.

91011
Christianity
Islam
Judaism
Zoroastrianism

What is the role of Zoroastrianism in the formation of Judaism Christianity and Islam?

My answer is coming from a presupposition that all religions are man-made and that Christianity, Islam and Judaism are all have values and beliefs found in earlier animistic religions. Zoroaster (or Zarathustra) was the first to hold a belief in monotheism (Zoroastrianism's god is Ahura Mazda) and start a religion based on monotheism. prior to him, religions were mainly polytheistic. the idea of Satan, the idea of angels and demons, the final resurrection and final judgement are also other concepts that were found first in Zoroastrianism. Countries in the Middle East have many cultural influences from Zoroastrianism as well, especially Iran, formerly known as Persia, where Zoroaster spread his religion. The flame around the head of pious or holy individuals in old Islamic art is something originating in Zoroastrianism with their strong reverence for fire.

111213
Religion & Spirituality
Zoroastrianism

What are the basic teachings of Zoroastrianism?

Zoroastrianism seems to be pragmatic, possibly ' khrafstars' like insects, ants were seen as deadly for hygienic reasons. Cleanliness was very important.

Maybe that's why khrafstars that were seen as turned to benificial by 'the creator of good'

567
Religion & Spirituality
Ancient History
Ancient Religions
Zoroastrianism

What religions are related to Zoroastrianism?

Some have claimed a limited connection between Zoroastrianism and Judaism.

Since the two groups lived side by side in Babylonia, there may have been some borrowing in language or other minor matters. But in terms of beliefs, the two are quite different.Judaism, according to tradition, has always been monotheistic. Even at the height of the unfortunate spread of idolatry among the less-loyal Ten Tribes, there were thousands who remained loyal to God (1 Kings 19:18).


The Zoroastrians, however, believed in two gods, not one. The Jewish Sages who redacted the Talmud in the early centuries of the Common Era lived in Babylonia, witnessed the practices of the Zoroastrians, and recorded this fact (Talmud, Sanhedrin 39a). In addition, Zoroastrianism is unlike Judaism in that:

  • its deity is not immanent
  • it believes in worship through intermediaries, who are themselves "worthy of worship"
  • evil has its own creator, Angra Mainyu or Ahriman, which had always existed
  • some of its adherents believe in a self-creating universe
  • some modern scholars see it as a form of pantheism
  • it has "fire-temples," with worship in the presence of flame
  • its adherents are not required to marry within their faith
  • some Zoroastrians dispose of their dead through ritual exposure to the open sky, while some others cremate the dead
  • dogs are considered sacred
  • such creatures as snakes, ants and flies were "not created by the creator of good"
  • it includes a virgin birth, in which its messiah will be conceived without sexual penetration.
Compare: What do Jews believe God is like?
345

Copyright © 2020 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.