Medieval Warfare

Medieval Warfare refers to warfare during the Middle Ages (5th – 15th century). This period saw a significant change in military weapons and tactics, with the introduction of gun powder, personal armor, and siege warfare.

1,893 Questions
Middle Ages
Medieval Warfare
Knights

Is the armor worn by knights bulletproof?

319320321
Middle Ages
Medieval Warfare
Knights

Who created the weapons in the middle ages?

Better weapons were made by armorers. Blacksmiths made weapons, and peasants made weapons by putting agricultural tools like scythe blades and bill hooks on poles. Bowyers made bows, fletchers made arrows, and heavy weapons like catapults were made by engineers. The early cannons were sometimes made by bellfounders.

275276277
Digital Video Recorders
Jobs & Education
Medieval Warfare

What is the abbreviation for obsolete?

OB is the abbreviation for obsolete.

177178179
Castles
Medieval Warfare

What is a siege tower used for?

Siege Towers enabled soldiers to scale the Walls of besieged cities. Inside were different levels where archers loosing arrows or catapults hurling rocks could break the Resistance of a defending army. If the besieging army couldn't force a surrender, the Siege could last months until starvation made the city's give in.

EDIT:

One of the key features of siege towers was very different from most other siege equipment. Rather than trying to destroy walls, gates and other defences, the siege tower was designed to allow invaders to scale the walls without damaging them at all, allowing for large-scale attacks without the need to wear the outer defences down first.

155156157
Medieval Warfare

How does a crossbow trigger work?

169170171
Middle Ages
Medieval Warfare
Knights

Did knights in the medieval times use flails?

Knights probably never used flails. The flail is a tool used for threshing grain. The first known use of it as a weapon in Europe was in the Hussite Wars, which were in the period of 1420 to 1434, where it was used by farmers.

There is a link to a very short article below.

145146147
History of China
Medieval Warfare
Great Wall of China

What year did the Mongols conquer all of China?

Kublai defeated the song in 1279.so the answer is year 1279 :)

135136137
Cooking Equipment
Medieval Warfare
Breads

Where can you get the cooking tool that can weigh down an English muffin while you grill it in a pan or skillet?

Check out Mission Restaurant Supply. They stock a few steak weights and other food presses. Here's a link: http://www.missionrs.com/presses-weights.html

You dont have to use a weight you can use a pan or just dont use anything just cook an both side but you can get one at any food supplys and ex. stores

*They are called a grill press or bacon weight, and you can find one at the Lodge Cookware site.

you can also use a stone or a brick wrapped in aluminum foil

ANSWER:Or you use what I use. Its an inverted coffee cup saucer made out of corningware. It works great for grilled cheese sandwiches too.
135136137
Medieval Warfare
Knights
Celtic History

Did the Celts wear plate armor?

As a general answer, no - but with some possibilities.

the Celts were skilled craftsmen in the production and creation of iron and steel, and are known to have produced maille (chainmail) for defence. They are likewise known to have produced helms which involved the creation of metal plates it is not impossible that the same skills were used for body defenses.

Tacitus makes reference to the German Celts wearing strong metal armour, but it is uncertain if this is solid plate, or maille.

Therefore, it should be concluded that it is certainly possible that a few rare peices of plate defence such as breastplates were made by the Celts, but there is insufficient evidence of its use to state so with absolute certainty. What is absolutely certain is their use of metal, non-plate armours.

123124125
Ancient History
Medieval Warfare

What changes in government did the mongols make?

they were more violent and increased taxes. They did not know the same language as the Chinese.

117118119
History of Asia
Medieval Warfare
Ottoman Empire

What is significant about Sultan Mehmed II and Suleiman the Magnificent?

Sultan Mehmed II of the Ottoman Empire was famous for mainly conqoring the one of the Holy Christian city of Constantinople and reforming its power and people to Islam beleifs. After conqoring the city, he moved the Ottoman Empire capital from Adrianople to Constantinople. To control his people from Christian uprisings, he gave them a choic; switch to Islamic or die. The Christian men who feared death chose to change religions, as though who were true to God and his son, chose death. The migration of people to Constantinople increased ideas, for individuals from all over where sharing ideas. Besides conqoring the city of Constantinople, Sultan Mehmed is also given credit for Eastern European urbanization.

113114115
Archery
Technology
Medieval Warfare

Do bow and longbow arrows work with crossbows and do crossbow bolts work with bows and longbows?

No and no.

Specifically, arrows for bows are longer and more flexible as a slight flex can improve an arrow's flight, but crossbows would be too powerful and break the arrow.

Crossbow bolts/quarrels are far too short to be used correctly in a bow, as a real archer would never partially draw the bow to shoot an arrow, yet a bolt would not be long enough for the archer to draw back to his or her anchor point (that same place on their face they always draw back to, to make shots powerful and consistent).

105106107
Middle Ages
Medieval Warfare

Was there a second in command in medieval battles?

Sometimes, but usually not. Because battles were mostly conducted by Royalty, there would usually only be someone to take the place of a killed or injured leader if there were other Royals on the field. There was nothing like the chain of command and the organised leadership transfers that there are in today's armies

To expound on the above, Western medieval combat was basically a semi-organized mob. Each side would consist of several groups, each usually commanded by the noble from whose lands the soldiers came. There would be a single "commander" of the whole army, but this person was often not in operational control of the army. There did not exist any sort of chain-of-command; rather, the assemblage of nobles would usually pick a leader (and often a deputy) to be in overall command. This commander could then issue what we would now call directives (rather than orders) to each of the nobles' groups.

For instance, here's how a medieval army might be "structured":

King A brings 100 knights, 1000 man-at-arms, and 500 archers.

King B bring 200 knights, 5000 man-at-arms, but no archers.

Noble C (who nominally owes fealty to King B) bring 100 knights.

Noble D (an independent noble who isn't royalty, but isn't a vassal of King A or B) bring 500 man-at-arms and 500 archers.

A, B, C, and D would all retain "command" of their individual groups of soldiers (it would be very unlikely to do something like combine the archers of A & D into one group under someone else's command). Probably, King B sould be selected as the leader of the whole army. King A would likely be elected deputy commanders. In all likelihood, though, Noble C and D would NOT take "orders" from A unless they knew that B had been killed or otherwise out-of-action.

If that sounds horrible, it was. Medieval battles were notoriously uncoordinated and chaotic, with bad battlefield communication technology making the situation even worse.

Formal chain-of-command structures didn't start occuring until the end of the medieval period, when warfare shifted towards nation vs nation rather than traditional feudal warfare. That is, things didn't really improve until the Renaissance.

103104105
Middle Ages
Medieval Warfare

What eating utensils were used during the medieval times?

The fork had not quite gained all its tines so there was a pointed stick, knives, and spoons. Forks were in fact hardly used at all until after the renaissance.

Most cutlery in the medieval period was made out of pewter or sometimes wrought iron. Silver cutlery was sometimes used by the gentry, but even they often used pewter and wrought iron.

919293
Middle Ages
Medieval Warfare
Police and Law Enforcement

What weapons did Medieval police use?

The weapons available to enforce the law were basically peasant farm tools. The law keepers of the Middle Ages were quite different from what we have today, and there were no official police organizations. The types of law keeping organizations differed from place to place as well.

In England, for example, there were constables, who were able to get support by recruiting from local peasants, when that was necessary, and tithings, which were the groups of peasant families from which the constables got their support. A tithing was nominally a group of ten households and was held responsible, as a group, for maintaining the peace. If one of the members of a tithing got into trouble with the law, the tithing was held responsible for seeing that the person was available to be tried.

838485
Medieval Warfare

What time in history were catapults used?

Catapults have been used since before Alexander the Great. Around 400 BC I think. These were simple ones like a bow tilted sideways on steroids. Called a gastrophetes or belly bow. Then Romans made some nice catapults called onagers (100 BC to 300 AD was their high time). Eventually you get to trebuchets which had counterweights and were the biggest and baddest of all. These were used in medieval times up to the late fourteen century until cannons beat them out. Hope this helps!

838485
Medieval Warfare

Why were mongols barbaric?

Yes very. They were known as the bane of christianity as they moved in to eirope on their military campiagns and killed Christians.

Generally, people throughout history have used the term "barbaric" to mean "something different than the way we do things", implying that the "barbaric" way was inferior. Which, of course, was not strictly true.

In that sense, the mongols were "barbaric", because they most certainly were very different than the European cultures of the time.

In the other sense of the word "barbaric", meaning "cruel or brutal", the tactics of the Mongols could certainly be characterized as such. The Mongols were famous for butchering to the last person any city which refused to surrender to it. That is, the Mongol army would arrive at a city, and demand it's surrender. If it refused, and the Mongols later captured the city (which, happend the vast majority of the time), then Mongols would then kill everyone inside. Even if the city surrendered immediately, the typical Mongol response would be to depopulate the city (move everyone out) into the local countryside, raze the entire city to the ground, then sell large portions of the remaining population into slavery, while forcing the rest into agricultural work.

818283
Ancient History
Castles
Medieval Warfare

Why were catapults built?

Catapults were built for infiltration of reinforced areas. also used for terrifying citizens during a siege

818283
Middle Ages
Medieval Warfare

Why was warfare such a constant feature of late medieval life?

I think war has always been a constant feature, except recently. We know more about wars in the Late Middle Ages than we do of the Early Middle Ages, but that is probably because records were not kept in the Early Middle Ages quite as well in the later times. Remember, the Early Middle Ages was prehistoric for large parts of Europe, and we have very little information about what was happening in those places.

As English speaking people, our sense of history is also very much formed by the history of England. The Late Middle Ages is often dated as being from 1300 to 1453, and the Hundred Years' War lasted from 1337 to 1453, nearly the entire time. When we consider the broader picture, we see that in the years from the start of the Late Middle Ages to the beginning of the Hundred Years' War, there were other conflicts going on, with the English being involved in the Wars of Scottish Independence from before 1300, with only four years' break, until 1357. So there were only four years in which England was not at war in the Late Middle ages.

But if we compare this with the Early Middle Ages, Britain was occupied by a large number of small kingdoms, and there was always conflict among them. We read about the heptarchy, which had seven kingdoms, but in fact the number was closer to twenty, and that was just Anglo-Saxons. Include Scots, Picts, Welsh, and others, and there was quite a number of small nations. And we have not begun to talk about Vikings, who were at constant warfare with All of these people.

In the High Middle Ages, England was often warring with the Welsh, Scots, and each other. Of course, we must remember the crusades.

Since the Middle Ages, there was nearly always some sort of war going on in Europe, until the late 19th century.

Before the Middle Ages, there was a time some historians refer to as the Pax Romana. But you might consider the gates of Janus, which were closed when there was peace everywhere for Romans. During the first centuries of their existence, under the kings and the republic, they were only closed twice for short times. Augustus closed them two or three times, each time to be reopened. They were occasionally closed under later emperors, to much celebration. But they never stayed closed for long.

Hopefully, the 20th century taught us something, which is that wars are too costly for anyone to win. When a war starts, the most likely result is that everyone loses.

757677
Timing Belts and Chains
Middle Ages
Medieval Warfare

What was the time period of the Medieval Flail?

AnswerIn Europe, particularly the mid-13th to late 15th centuries. Variations on the flail have been used since far earlier, and until more recently, in Asia. AnswerHe is right -the flail, in some variation had been around for much longer - a flail was one of the symbols the Pharaohs of Egypt carried AnswerThe flail is an agricultural tool used by farmers for threshing grain, and as such existed from the most ancient history. The pharaohs used it to symbolize the fact that they were the providers of food. It is one of many tools farmers use that can make effective weapons.

According the the Wikipedia article on flails, the earliest recorded use as a weapon was in the Hussite wars, which took place in about 1420-1425. These wars also saw the first effective use of personal handguns, or hand cannons.

There is a link to the article below.

757677
Archery
Medieval Warfare
RuneScape
The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim

Is a 'crossbow' really a bow?

Crossbow
For practical purposes, yes, a crossbow is really a bow. It uses a short arrow, technically called a bolt, by means of the spring action caused by releasing the tension on the crossbow's limbs. The "bow" of the crossbow is called a "prod".

It differs from a traditional bow however, in that it can be drawn before it is needed and kept ready to use for a considerable period of time. Holding a "regular" bow, such as a self-bow, longbow, recurve, or compound bow at full draw for any length of time may not be feasible, depending on draw weight. Traditional bows (recurves, longbows, etc), unlike modern compound bows, often do not have sights while modern crossbows do; this, coupled with the fact that it doesn't cause a lot of strain on the shooter to hold the crossbow at a full draw, makes it easier for an unskilled individual to use the weapon. The crossbow can be cocked either manually by simply pulling the string back, or by mechanical means - which means handicapped persons can use crossbows in those states which allow their use. Most crossbows sold today have about the same arrow speed as compounds: about 330 - 350 ft/sec.

While the crossbow is a bow, it offers a great advantage over Traditional bows. It should also be noted, so does the modern compound bow. In the 1970's there was a debate whether or not compound bows should be allowed for hunting. State-by-State, compound bows were allowed, and today more than 80% of all bow hunters use compound bows; this is an approximation, of course, as the use of Traditional bows (and arrows) has been increasing. Overall, the acceptance of compounds has been good for archery. Now with more and more crossbows being sold, crossbow hunters are asking why they can not also be included in the archery season, because compounds and crossbows have such similar performance.

The answer to that question is that the modern crossbow is so easy to use; some claim that it is more like using a rifle than a bow. Modern crossbows tend to incorporate the camming (the "wheels" at the ends of the bow-limbs) which makes the compound bow easier to use than Traditional bows.

The Chinese developed a repeating crossbow, where a new bolt would drop onto the rails of the crossbow each time the string (called a "cable", due to its thickness) was pulled back to the "ready" position (cocked, ready to use). The real trick would be to keep the bolt-hopper loaded - and have each bolt facing the correct direction in the hopper.

During the Middle Ages, the crossbow was taken to sometimes extreme designs. Weapons such as the Arbalest and the ballista are basically over-sized crossbows. Of course, crossbows were also slightly simpler in design back then; see the weblink ("Torneo della Balestra") under "Related Links" for some photos of (possibly)the oldest-surviving Crossbow Society in the Modern World.

Persons interested in hunting with (modern)crossbows should contact The American Crossbow Federation, Box 251, Glenwood, MN 56334
727374
Roman Empire
Medieval Warfare
RuneScape

When can you use crossbows?

In runescape. You can always

676869
Castles
Medieval Warfare

What is the largest castle siege in history?

Troy if the myth is correct well at least i think so

656667
Castles
Medieval Warfare

Is castle drogo medieval?

No it is the most modernly build castle in the U.k. Build after world war 2.

616263
History of China
Medieval Warfare

Did the Japanese conquer the Mongols?

NO. They successfully staved off 2 invasion attempts made by the Mongols in 1274 and 1281.

616263

Copyright © 2020 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.