Fables and Folklore

Fables and folklore are stories that convey a moral story. They usually contain some kinds of supreme being and try to explain where certain things come from. Folklores are usually stories passed down in a culture.

Asked in Fables and Folklore

Do shapeshifters exist?

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In myths and fairy tales, yes. In real life, no.
Asked in Fables and Folklore

What idea does the beauty myth refer to?

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Generally speaking, most sayings about beauty refer to beauty being skin deep, or beauty is in the eye of the beholder. The first, and others like it, refer to the fact that while you may be good-looking, or a beautiful person, what your face looks like won't matter if you act like a wretch. The second, beauty being in the eye of the beholder and such, implies that different people find different things to be beautiful, or worthy of adoration. A mathematician might find a particularly complex equation to be beautiful and worthy of adoration, whereas an artist would think colors and paintings and a scenic view are beautiful and worthy of adoration.
Asked in Mythology, Fables and Folklore

What are all gods of Love and Lust deity?

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Albanian folklore Prende, goddess of love Armenian mythology Astghik, goddess of fertility and love Aztec mythology Xochiquetzal, goddess of fertility, beauty, and female sexual power Buddhism Aizen Myō-ō or Rāgarāja, a deity who transforms worldly lust into spiritual awakening; his red-skinned appearance represents suppressed lust and passion Canaanite mythology Astarte, goddess of sexual love, fertility, and warfare Qetesh, goddess of love, beauty and sex Celtic mythology Aine, Irish mythology|Irish]] goddess of love, summer, wealth and sovereignty Cliodhna Irish goddess, sometimes identified as a goddess of love and beauty[1] Chinese mythology Tu Er Shen, a Chinese deity who manages the love and sex between homosexual men Egyptian mythology Bes, god of music, dance, and sexual pleasure Hathor, goddess of the sky, love, beauty, and music Bastet, goddess of felines, love, sexuality, protection, beauty, and dance Etruscan mythology Albina, goddess of the dawn and protector of ill-fated lovers Turan, goddess of love and vitality Greek mythology Aphrodite, goddess of love, lust and beauty The Erotes Anteros, god of requited love Eros, god of love and sexual passion Himeros, god of sexual desire Hedylogos, god of sweet talk and flattery Hymenaios, god of marriage and marriage feasts Pothos, god of sexual longing, yearning and desire Peitho, personification of persuasion and seduction Guaraní mythology Kurupi, god of sexuality and fertility Hindu mythology Kamadeva, god of love Rati, goddess of passion and lust Lithuanian mythology Milda, goddess of love and freedom Mesopotamian mythology Inanna or Ishtar, goddess of sexual love, fertility, and warfare[2] Moroccan mythology Qandisa, goddess of lust who first seduces men then drives them insane[3] Norse mythology Freyja, goddess associated with love, beauty, fertility, gold, seiðr, war, and death Freyr, worshipped as a phallic fertility god, he was said to "[bestow] peace and pleasure on mortals" Sjöfn, goddess associated with love Roman mythology Cupid, the Roman equivalent of the Greek god Eros Venus, the Roman equivalent of the Greek goddess Aphrodite Slavic mythology Dogoda, Polish spirit of the west wind, associated with love and gentleness Dzydzilelya, Polish goddess of love and marriage and of sexuality and fertility Lada, fakeloric goddess of harmony, merriment, youth, love and beauty, who almost certainly never existed Siebog, god of love and marriage Živa, goddess of love and fertility Vodou Baron La Croix, loa of the dead and sexuality Baron Samedi, loa of the dead, sex and resurrection Erzulie Freda Dahomey, loa of love, beauty, jewelry, dancing, luxury, and flowers Yoruba mythology Mami Wata, a pantheon of water deities sometimes associated with love and lust Oshun, goddess of love, intimacy, beauty, wealth and diplomacy From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding reliable references. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (June 2008) The Birth of Venus by Sandro Botticelli (1485), depicting Venus, the Roman goddess of love, lust and beauty A love deity is a deity in mythology associated with sexual love, lust or sexuality. Love deities are common in mythology and may be found in many polytheistic religions. Contents [hide] 1 List of love and lust deities 1.1 Albanian folklore 1.2 Armenian mythology 1.3 Aztec mythology 1.4 Buddhism 1.5 Canaanite mythology 1.6 Celtic mythology 1.7 Chinese mythology 1.8 Egyptian mythology 1.9 Etruscan mythology 1.10 Greek mythology 1.11 Guaraní mythology 1.12 Hindu mythology 1.13 Lithuanian mythology 1.14 Mesopotamian mythology 1.15 Moroccan mythology 1.16 Norse mythology 1.17 Roman mythology 1.18 Slavic mythology 1.19 Vodou 1.20 Yoruba mythology 2 References 3 External links List of love and lust deities Albanian folklore Prende, goddess of love Armenian mythology Astghik, goddess of fertility and love Aztec mythology Xochiquetzal, goddess of fertility, beauty, and female sexual power Buddhism Aizen Myō-ō or Rāgarāja, a deity who transforms worldly lust into spiritual awakening; his red-skinned appearance represents suppressed lust and passion Canaanite mythology Astarte, goddess of sexual love, fertility, and warfare Qetesh, goddess of love, beauty and sex Celtic mythology Aine, Irish mythology|Irish]] goddess of love, summer, wealth and sovereignty Cliodhna Irish goddess, sometimes identified as a goddess of love and beauty[1] Chinese mythology Tu Er Shen, a Chinese deity who manages the love and sex between homosexual men Egyptian mythology Bes, god of music, dance, and sexual pleasure Hathor, goddess of the sky, love, beauty, and music Bastet, goddess of felines, love, sexuality, protection, beauty, and dance Etruscan mythology Albina, goddess of the dawn and protector of ill-fated lovers Turan, goddess of love and vitality Greek mythology Aphrodite, goddess of love, lust and beauty The Erotes Anteros, god of requited love Eros, god of love and sexual passion Himeros, god of sexual desire Hedylogos, god of sweet talk and flattery Hymenaios, god of marriage and marriage feasts Pothos, god of sexual longing, yearning and desire Peitho, personification of persuasion and seduction Guaraní mythology Kurupi, god of sexuality and fertility Hindu mythology Kamadeva, god of love Rati, goddess of passion and lust Lithuanian mythology Milda, goddess of love and freedom Mesopotamian mythology Inanna or Ishtar, goddess of sexual love, fertility, and warfare[2] Moroccan mythology Qandisa, goddess of lust who first seduces men then drives them insane[3] Norse mythology Freyja, goddess associated with love, beauty, fertility, gold, seiðr, war, and death Freyr, worshipped as a phallic fertility god, he was said to "[bestow] peace and pleasure on mortals" Sjöfn, goddess associated with love Roman mythology Cupid, the Roman equivalent of the Greek god Eros Venus, the Roman equivalent of the Greek goddess Aphrodite Slavic mythology Dogoda, Polish spirit of the west wind, associated with love and gentleness Dzydzilelya, Polish goddess of love and marriage and of sexuality and fertility Lada, fakeloric goddess of harmony, merriment, youth, love and beauty, who almost certainly never existed Siebog, god of love and marriage Živa, goddess of love and fertility Vodou Baron La Croix, loa of the dead and sexuality Baron Samedi, loa of the dead, sex and resurrection Erzulie Freda Dahomey, loa of love, beauty, jewelry, dancing, luxury, and flowers Yoruba mythology Mami Wata, a pantheon of water deities sometimes associated with love and lust Oshun, goddess of love, intimacy, beauty, wealth and diplomacy
Asked in Fables and Folklore

Why are myths told?

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Myths are told for fun, and also to convey a poetic truth, as well as to remember the past, in which myth was largely accepted as truth.
Asked in Fables and Folklore

How pilandok become a sultan story?

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The Sun and the Moon[1] Once upon a time the Sun and the Moon were married, and they had many children who were the stars. The Sun was very fond of this children, but whenever he tried to embrace any of them, he was so hot that he burned them up. This made the Moon so angry that finally she forbade him to touch them again, and he was greatly grieved. One day the Moon went down to the spring to do some washing, and when she left she told the sun that he must not touch any of their children in her absence. When she returned, however, she found that he had disobeyed her, and several of the children in had perished. She was very angry, and picked up a banana tree to strike hime, whereupon he threw sand in her face, and to this day you can see the dark marks on the face of the Moon. Then the Sun started to chase her, and they have been going ever since. Sometimes he gets so near that he almost catches her, but she escapes, and bay and bay she is far ahead again.[2] [1] These Visayan tales reflect old beliefs covered with a veneer of European ideas. The Visayan still holds to many of the old superstitions, not because he has reasoned them out for himself, but because his ancestors believed them and transmitted them to him in such stories as these. [2] A very old explanatory tale. In a slightly varying from it is found in other parts of the islands. by alag franz
Asked in Fables and Folklore, Vampires

Are humans better than vampires?

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As with all questions of this nature it is the responsibility of the asker to provide some criteria for the evaluator to make a comparison upon. For example: are humans better at chess than vampires are? The answer to this is No, most vampires that manage to perpetuate their existence are better at chess than the earth's population at large. This is because it isn't easy being a vampire and some degree of craftiness is required for the vampire to continue its existence amid a homicidally hostile human population. This craftiness is reflected in the vampires ability to play games of logic such as chess.
Asked in Fables and Folklore, Vampires

How and where has it been proven that vampires and werewovles exist?

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vampires do not exist. they are fiction, a creation of mind. i would have loved to be a vampire if they existed but the truth is they do not.
Asked in Fables and Folklore

What does the king do to solve his problem in the story of The Adarna Bird?

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The king in the story actually had two problems to solve - his sickness at the beginning of the story and the conflicting claims of two princesses who wanted to marry his youngest son Don Juan at the end of the story. In the Filipino epic, Ibong Adarna, the king loved his youngest son Don Juan so much that that when one night, he dreamed that two traitors conspired against Don Juan, the king became so frightened and depressed that he did not even want to eat or take a rest, and fell sick with a malady, of which none of the physicians of the kingdom were able to cure. The king was advised that the Adarna bird was the only creature in the world which could restore to him his lost health and tranquility by using its song. Acting on this advice, he sent out his oldest son Don Pedro to look for this coveted animal. Unfortunately Don Pedro fell asleep beneath the tree where the Adarna was accustomed to pass the night and the bird defecated on him, turning him to stone. The second son, Don Diego, met the same fate. The youngest son Don Juan succeeded where his brothers failed and not only captured the bird, but rescued his brothers, turning them back from stone to living humans. Even though he had rescued them, his brothers were jealous and conspired to beat him, leaving him unconscious in the middle of the road, and take the bird back themselves. Don Juan has several more adventures climaxing in him returning to the king with the princess Doña Maria in tow whose hand he had won through his great deeds. Waiting from Don Juan at the palace was another princess, Doña Leonora, who also wanted to marry Don Juan. The king consulted with the archbishop of the kingdom on the case and the church dignitary decided in favor of Doña Leonora. Doña Maria was not willing to give up Don Juan so easily however and used magic to bring on a great flood that threatened the whole kingdom, so the king convinced Princess Doña Leonora to be content with marrying Don Pedro, the brother of Don Juan, which she did for the good of all and Don Juan married Doña Maria.
Asked in Fables and Folklore, Science and Technology TV Shows

What happened to Carrie on myth busters?

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Kari Byron went on maternity leave, but returned to the Mythbusters as of the March 31, 2010 show.
Asked in Fables and Folklore, Aesop

What is a fable?

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A fable is a short tale, often involving animals as main characters, that communicates a piece of advice or some truth about human nature.
Asked in Fables and Folklore, Mermaids

What are winged mermaids called?

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winged mermaid are mermaid with wings some have 2 wings or none sirens and harpies.
Asked in Bats, Fables and Folklore, Vampires

Are blood elves vampires?

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No, blood elves are not vampires, in fact they are not even elves but a particular type of goblin.
Asked in Health, Fables and Folklore

How do you know you have lycanthropy?

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If you love werewolves, then lycanthropy could be your thing. (The only problem you may have is that werewolves are mythical figures.) The meaning of lycanthropy is having the ability to turn into a werewolf, along with having the power of one, as well.
Asked in School Subjects, Psychology, Fables and Folklore

Is the hawthorne effect a fact or a myth?

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First, the Hawthorne effect is a theory, not a fact. It has become "mythical" in its acceptance, but was based on seriously flawed research conducted over several years from about 1927 - 1932. Parsons has pretty much debunked the theory and it is no longer accepted by those who are familiar with his analysis and other data. See H. M. Parsons, Science, 8 March, 1974.
Asked in Fables and Folklore, The Twilight Saga, Vampires

What is the real history of Apotamkin the cold one?

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The Apotamkin is a demon or eternal creature that drinks the blood of humans. It supposedly lives in the dark, as in deep caves. This creature is unlike most other vampire folklore because it is exclusive to the Native American people. The creature is hairy with long fangs, and some consider it to be the Native American version of a vampire. This myth is used to instill fear into children from venturing into areas alone and without parental guidance. According to the book Vampire Universe by Jonathan Maberry, the Apotamkin is a legend of the Maliseet-Passamaquoddy tribe. There is only a fictional (Twilight) association of the Apotamkin with the Quileute tribe, whose histories say they are descended from wolves.
Asked in Fables and Folklore, Owls

What does it mean when you see a grey owl at night?

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It means you don't need glasses, unless you were wearing them when you saw the owl, in which case, you don't need a stronger pair of glasses.
Asked in Fables and Folklore, Urban Legends, Superstitions

Are shapeshifters immortal?

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It depends but most of them are not.
Asked in Movies, Fables and Folklore

What were the werewolves called van helsing?

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If I am correct, Lycans or Lycanthropes
Asked in Fables and Folklore, Word and Phrase Origins

What is the myth origin of the word narcissistic?

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Well Greek myth has the man named, Narcissus. The myth goes that this man was very beautiful, but he was also very vain and proud. Eventually the gods grew angry at him for his arrogance and punished him. They did this by making him fall in love with his face that reflected by a pond. He couldn't turn away and eventually wasted away and died. A more contemporary reference would be in Harry Potter with Narcissa Malfoy who was very proud and had believed greatly that her beauty surpassed everyone else's beauty.
Asked in Cats (Felines), Domestic Cat Breeds, Fables and Folklore, Demographics

Which is supposed to be bad luck - cat crossing your path or you crossing the cat's path?

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If a black cat comes across your path, it is considered bad luck. It could, however, just be superstition. Perhaps...
Asked in Fables and Folklore

What is the plot of the story coyote and the buffalo?

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In the myth of the Washington Indian mytho of how the buffalo never appears west of the mountains, the plot follows: Coyote is tripping along the prairie and crosses the path where Buffalo Bill has been killed by the younger buffalo. No plot there. So the plot kicks off the story beginning when Coyote takes revenge for the times Buffalo Bull "scared him" and no doubt chased him across the plains. His vengeance is to kick the bones and spit on the skull of the dead BB. (if he hadn't done this the plot would not have advanced to the next sequence) Magically, BB reappears alive and totally perturbed. The ongoing hostility between the 2 resumes. (as explained in the exposition in the 1st 2 paragraphs) BB chases coyote who ends up in a tree, about to be felled by BB. That's the 2nd stage of the conflict event. Then the coyote and BB come to an agreement, the 3rd big plot event: manufacturing (Acme, I'm sure) a new pair of horns for BB to rut the guts out of the young bull. When BB locates the young bull the climax of the story is reached with the death of the young bull and a reconciliation between coyote and BB. In the resolution, coyote is presented with a cow that he can take back to his people on the west side of the mountains. He kills the cow and is back to square one with nothing, and because of his greed and selfishness, and vanity, has deprived his people of the buffalo. And that is the theme. Denouement is the same as the falling action. The story stops building after the reconciliation, though I can see how the pivot in the story may be focused on the murder of the cow. Just taught this story to the class. Antagonist to my mind is BB, protagonist, coyote. My coteacher disagreed. As long as you can support your answer, you win.
Asked in Fables and Folklore, Unicorns

What is a unicorn?

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A unicorn is a animal of legends and folklore. It is said to have the body of a horse, tail of a lion and a single spiraled horn. Some legends say it will run from everyone but a young maiden. Then it will lay its head in her lap and fall asleep. Some say that the unicorn is the symbol of the Virgin Mary. The Chinese have their own version of the story.