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Ford Taurus

The Taurus is a vehicle manufactured by the Ford Motor Company. Introduced in 1986, it was initially offered as a mid-size vehicle. The Taurus is now offered as a full-size all-wheel drive vehicle.

8,714 Questions
Headlights Tail and Brake Lights
Ford Taurus
Mercury Sable

How do you replace the tail - turn or brake light bulbs on a Ford Taurus?

You go through the trunk and on either side is the light housing unit that you remove 4 nuts from, pull out and there will be the individual bulbs to be replaced.

IN DEPTH:

In order to replace the light bulbs you will have to remove the entire rear light housing unit. In order to do this you must do the following:

  1. Pop the trunk.
  2. Loosen the trunk lining in order to reach the 4 nuts that are located on the right or left side and hold the light housing in place.
  3. You loosen the trunk lining fabric by removing two small, black plastic fasteners that anchor the trunk lining fabric. These either screw loose or you will need to pop off using a blunt- nosed pliers ( a flat head screwdriver works in a pinch) by first pulling the square bit out (towards the direction of the back seat,) followed by the circular components.
  4. Pull the fabric loose on either the left or right side to expose the 4 nuts holding the light assembly in place.
  5. Now, look for the four gold colored washer and nut assemblies surrounding the tail-light assembly. Find yourself a 7/16 socket and remove those bad boys. The tail-light itself should be able to pop- out, otherwise you've missed a washer- nut.
  6. Ease the tail- light assembly off of it's perch on the car and hold it red- side down. This will expose the wiring and "turn- locks" for the blinker and tail- light.
  7. Remove the bulbs from the assembly by turning the turn- locks in the direction (counter- clockwise) indicated by the plastic molding, and pulling upwards, off of the tail- light assembly.
  8. Pull the bulb from the turn- lock with a moderate tug of the hand.

She's out! Success!

And don't forget to put the other one in before you close everything back up

- 2000-2005

These procedures are well detailed and illustrated in the Owners Manual - See "Related Questions"

The tail light, brake light, turn signal and backup light bulbs are located in the same tail lamp / lens assembly. Follow the same steps to replace either bulb.

Sedan

  1. Open trunk and remove two plastic mushroom nuts, five push pins and the plastic cover from inside the trunk to get at the lens mounting nuts

    The nuts are likely 10mm - and a deep-well socket will handy to speed removal

  2. Remove three nuts and washers and the lens will pull away making it easy to get at the bulb sockets. Turn counter-clockwise to release the socket

Wagon

  1. Open the liftgate to remove the 2 lens assemblies mounting screws -
  2. Pull the lens assembly from the tailgate
  3. Twist the bulb socket counterclockwise to release
  4. Pull the bulb straight out of the socket and push in the new bulb.

Tip: the old adage if one goes, the other is likely to follow shortly is true in my experience. While you've got the tools out, and typically you get 2 bulbs in the package, just do the bulbs on both sides of the car - you'll be back out there real soon anyways.

It's done from inside the trunk -- there are 5 11mm nuts behind the lens assembly area. The upper three nuts remove the tail lamp assembly.

There are two bulbs..running light and break light bulbs. The bulb to the red glass compartment / portion of the lens is the brake light bulb. Takes about 5 minutes unscrewing the nuts, replacing the bulb, screwing the nuts back on and finally replacing the liner.

You have to remove the 'carpeted' panel behind it in the trunk and then remove all of the bolts that holds the brake light assembly in place. The assembly will pull out and then you remove the light socket from the assembly, replace the bulb and reverse this process to re install. The clips to remove the carpeted panel require a flat screwdriver to 'pry' them out and then they pull straight out. Whole process takes about 10 minutes if you know what you're doing (I didn't the first time, took about 30 minutes)

Additional Information1996-2005

Bulb Numbers:

  • FRONT Turn-signal - 3457 AK (amber)
  • Headlamp - 9007 QL (9007LL optional)
  • Tail lamp/brake/turn lamp 3157
  • Tail lamp/brake lamp (wagon) 3157
  • Rear turn lamp (wagon) 3456K
  • Backup lamp 921
  • Backup lamp (wagon) 3156
  • License plate lamp (2) 168
  • High-mount brake lamp (2) 912
  • Rear side marker lamp (wagon) (2) 168

The above information extracted from the Owners Manuals(see below)

tail light 2000 Taurus

Open the trunk and pull the carpet away from the back of the tail lights and then all you have to do is twist and pull out old bulb

As answer above except. I own a 2000 Ford Taurus SES and I found when you pull the sides over inside the trunk there you'll find three (3) nuts. Take the three nuts off, then carefully pull on the light cover. Once you have the tail light off the car, turn it over. Ya'll see the back of the light socket. Carefully turn the light socket and pull it out. Now you can change your balb.

To remove the tail light lens on a 2003 Taurus you open the trunk. Inside the truck below the opening on the left and right side are black knobs. Remove the knob on the side of the truck that you wish to remove the tail light lens. This knob is on a stud with a nut that needs to be removed as well as the interior insulation. The insulation right behind the tail light lens needs to be pulled away to expose the nuts that attach the tail light lens.Remove these nuts/washer and carefully pull the lens away from the car. To remove the two bulbs/wire assemblies from the back of the lens turn the bulb socket 1/4 turn counter-clockwise. The lens is now free of the vehicle.

You will need to remove two trim clips, the first one is on the edge of the hard plastic trim and the second one is right behind the light. you then should be able to pull back the carpet trim, you should be now able to see the three bolts that hold the light assembly in place. You may see five bolts, but only three need to be removed. The lower one on the outside and the lower one on the inside do not need to be removed. you will need a 7/16 nut driver or socket, and once the three nuts are removed the assembly should just pull off. you may have to unclip the power cord so that you can turn the socket a 1/4 turn and it should just pull out. the replacement bulb is a 3157. good luck.

You can fix it on your own but another pair of hands will make this fix alot easier. Open the trunk, remove the inside panel, the side that you want to change, that's right behind the tail light. Use a flat tip screw driver to remove the plastic anchors locate at the face of the panel(s), usually black. You will see hex nuts that are holding in the light assembly. Use a deep socket, it works better. Once the nuts are removed the light assembly will slide out and you can rotate the light holder assembly and then change the bulds. When putting it back together, make sure the rubber around the light assembly is placed correctly, if not, water my come into the trunk compartment. You can email me if this helped you out at rwb4u2c@msn.com Bob Blaze

After pulling up the lining in the trunk, you must remove all the nuts, including the one behind the knob for the cargo netting. Twist off the cargo netting knob and then remove the nut behind there and the whole taillight assembly will be removable.

YOU MUST REMOVE THE CARPET IN THE TRUNK THAT COVERS THE TAIL LIGHT THEN REMOVE THE BOLTS THAT HOLD THE TAIL NLIGHT IN. FROM THE OUTSIDE, REMOVE THE WHOLE TAILLIGHT ASSEMBLY AND THE THE BULB IN QUESTION. SIMPLY REPLACE THE BAD BULB THEN REVERSE YOUR STEPS ABOUT 15 TO 30 MIN. GOOD LUCK

In order to get to the rear turn signal, you will first need to remove the center panel located below the opening of the trunk lid. This is held in place by three push rivets. They are about 3 inches long and will come out with some tugging. Now, lift up on the panel to remove it. Once the center panel is out, all you need to do now is unscrew the mushroom hook located at the edge of the side panel. The light assembly is located behind this panel. The light bulb socket will loosen by twisting it approx. 1/4 turn counterclockwise.

Since the plastic "rivets" are difficult to remove, I recommend replacing them with screw type push rivets for the next time you do this. I found some a NAPA that works pretty well. The part number for these is 665-2114.

Check the bulbs. If one isn't flashing, replace the bulb by turning it counterclockwise in the rear of the light . Sometimes you have to remove the light from the car to get to the back of the light. If they all burn but still blink fast it is a sign of a partially grounded circuit which will have to be manually traced or an incorrect bulb in the circuit.

open the trunk and usually there is screws there. on the top as well as the bottom. unscrew those and pull out.

Open the trunk and remove the lining on the side you are changing. There are some plastic pins that hold the lining in place. You can pull those out with a flat screwdriver and pliers. You will see usually three large black wing shaped nuts that you can unscrew by hand. Sometimes a little tight so you may use pliers to get them started. Once they are off you can pull the whole tailight out. Hold the receptacle that holds the bulb you are changing turn it counter clockwise till it stops then pull it straight out. Pull bulb straight out of the socket push new bulb in and replace everything in reverse order. Test lights before you put it all back together.

Open the trunk. REmove the trunk liner from around the tail lights. That will expose the retaining nuts that hold the tail light assembly in place. Remove the nuts. Remove the tail light. Twist the bulb socket 1/4 turn and pull out. Reverse to install.

first open the trunk then remove the plastic panel on the rear trunk wall this is done by removing the two cargo net hooks or round nob looking things unscrews by hand no tool needed and two push clip. once plastic is removed then carefully pull the corner carpeting back on the side you want to replace. finely locate the four mounting studs just behind ware the lens is on the inside trunk area.remove the 10mm nuts with a deep well socket.

You must first remove the plastic cover directly inside the rear of the trunk. Then you mush remove the trunk lining from what ever side you need access. There are 3 nuts on the back side of the cover inside the trunk area. You must revove these e nuts, and they push the assembly out from inside the trunk. You may have to use something to pry the assembly away from the body. Once removed, you have access to the lamp socket. You muse turn the socket counter clockwise and remove the socket and bulb. Change the bulb and reverse the process.

Tail-light 98 Taurus

When you first open the trunk, you will see the grey lining being held with multiple black fasteners. Depending on what side the bulb is on, you need only remove two or three of the fasteners on the desired side. Once you locate and remove the fasteners, pull the lining back and you will see the multiple stud/nuts that hold the tail-light assembly in place. I believe it is a 3/8 deep socket that will remove those nuts. The assembly will pull out as a whole so take caution not to use extra force removing it from the vehicle.

Open trunk. Remove trunk liner. Remove bolts that hold light assembly in place. Pull light assembly out. Rotate socket 1/4 turn and entire socket will come out.

I own a 2000 Taurus SE and was surprised to see how much trouble it was to change a tail light. On my Taurus, I have to remove the interior panel on the inside, back of the trunk. You have to pop the plastic round clips off---which means you may have to go buy replacments. Once you get the panel off, the light is right there. Simply twist to remove the socket and then twist out the bulb.

open trunk, pull back trim (after removing nuts), remove nuts securing lens to body, twist connector and gently pull back, pull bulb out. reverse to install

In the trunk pull back the trunk lining. There will be plastic wing nuts. remove the wing nuts and pull out the brake light housing. You can change the bulb when you pull out the tail light assembly

open the trunk, remove the inside trim panel closest to the tailight assembly you are trying to service. Remove the three of four 7/16 nuts that hold the tailight in, and remove the assembly to access and replace the bulbs.

Open trunk.

Remove carpet on the side that the the bad bulb is on. Use kitchen fork to remove the plastic buttons that hold carpet if you don't have a puller.

Remove plastic twist nuts that bsecure tail light.

Pull out tail light and you are at the bulb.

Look in the trunk pull back the fabrick and youll see the back of the light plug twist it and pull out take the bad bulb to auto store and replace with new one

Be sure to review the "Related Questions" below for much more about Taurus lights

Turn the bulb holder counter-clockwise to remove it from the taillight assembly. Remove the bulb and install new one.

1.05k
Ford Taurus
Mercury Sable
Late Model 1979-New Ford Mustangs

Does a Ford Taurus - Mercury Sable have a radiator drain plug?

Yes it does, To access it:

Remove the lower valance panel that runs across the bottom of the frontend of the vehicle from the driver's side to the passenger's side. It is held on with three 8mm bolts and about a dozen 5.5mm screws. After you remove that, then you will see the bottom of the radiator where there is a drain cock on the driver's side. It looks like a plastic bolt and takes a 3/4 wrench to open it. Some models have one that can be twisted open by hand.

There are a dozen tips/tricks/hints in the "Related Question" below for finding and accessing the 1996 and newer Taurus/Sable radiator drain plug / petcock

when looking at the car from the front...it's at the bottom of the radiator on the driver's side.

Flushing and draining the radiator is important maintenance and prevents problems down the road such as clogged heater cores, blown headgaskets, and can help detect, or prevent water pump damage which can cause your vehicle to overheat.

:Buy a one inch hole saw from the hardware store, cost $2.00. Use it on a drill to make an access hole on the driver's side of the air dam underneath the radiator right where the drain plug protrudes down. Then use a socket wrench to turn the plug two turns counter clock-wise. It drains in about 10 minutes. The white drain plug can be seen from the front of the car just over the bumper on the driver's side.

Bill, I have a 1996 Ford Taurus GL and it indeed has a radiator drain plug. However, to drain it, there is a slight catch - (you saw this coming, right?) - you must remove about a gazillion screws and bolts from the "apron" underneath the front of the car and remove said "apron" to reach the drain plug on the driver's side. THEN you must use a socket wrench or hex wrench to open the plug(it's plastic-BE CAREFUL) and drain the radiator(make sure to open the radiator filler cap to relieve the vacuum created). While it's draining, go watch a video or something, it'll be awhile. Closing up the radiator is the reverse of all the above. I wish you luck. - Ted

Yes it has a drain plug but it can jam up if not used. It is far better to take off the bottom hose and point that into a large bucket to catch the coolant. While the coolant in the overflow looks like something from hell, the engine coolant in the radiator, engine block and heater cores looks good when I drained it. I just ran a lot of water through the block and the engine, started it up with the defrost on full for about 2 minutes to push some stuff out, then drained it and poured pure antifreeze in it. There is enough water left in the block to do the dilution....I checked it and got minus 34 so good enough up here

It's a pain in the butt, let me tell ya. There are two vent-type holes in the front of the car. Get a flashlight and look in the driver side one. move some tubes around and you'll see a plastic spigot type thing pointing down at an angle with a plastic knob underneath it. If you're lucky the thing won't be clogged. Attach a piece of tubing to the spigot and turn the knob (if that's not jammed). If it's clogged you're going to have to take the apron off the bottom of the car. On mine i just kept turning the knob and eventually the antifreeze started to come out from around it. It was slow going, but it worked. .

While it is indeed a pain, it only hurts the first time! To drain the radiator fast. Remove the lower cover underneath the front of the car. On the passenger side is a 1-1/4" hose connection. Disconnect here to drain fast. Otherwise, the radiator drain is on the bottom drivers side of the radiator. After carefully marking the location on the lower cover, then removing from the car, I used a hole-saw to cut a 1-1/2" hole directly under this drain plug. Now, I no longer have to remove the cover. A pair of needle nose pliers will reach the plug to unloosen. I also drilled a 1" hole slightly forward of this one for the angled drain. Which I slip a hose on to help direct the antifreeze draining..

It is easiest to pull the lower radiator hose. Be sure to save and dispose of the coolant according to epa instructions. A lot of parts houses will dispose of it for you. GoodluckJoe

The drain is located on the drivers side of the radiator. You have to remove the black apron to get to it. There were three bolts, and then 4 smaller screws holding it to the molding. There is more info here on this subject, as I originally found the answer to my question (which was similar to yours here).

I have a 97 Taurus, pretty much the same car. I have not found it. All I do to empty fluid (or orange water) locate the thermostat and hose the is clamped to it on the right side of the engine. Use some pliers to squeeze the clamp and move down about 3 or 4 inches. Pull hose off of thermostat housing and fold hose downward. Most of the fluid will empty from the radiator. As for the rest of the fluid. You can remove the thermostat housing and put water hose in the reservoir until clear water comes out of engine at housing that was just removed. When you reinstall, make sure you have a new gasket or you will have a leak, and use gasket glue to secure a tight fit. Make sure you clean out fluid frequently because the dirty water clogs your heater core and then you will have a large head ache.

Under the front of the sable is a water/dirt shield made of a plastic material that is bolted on with 4mm bolts ( about 8 )... there is also a single ( up to 3 ) 8mm bolt at the back of the shield that all need to be removed ( very easily done ) then remove the shield and you will see the bottom of the radiator assembly on the driver side of the car with a cream colored petcock valve and the outlet all pointing straight down. Open the fluid reservoir to help the discharge rate once you open the petcock.

There is a plastic protective panel/shroud you need to remove under the front end (some real tiny bolts near the bumper and three larger ones towards the engine) and you will see the draincock on the driver's side end of the radiator on the bottom (it's vertical, not horizontal). Recommend you cut a 2" x 2" hole in the panel for future access.

There is a piece of black trim under the front bumper that is attached with 4 Phillips screws, 5 or 6 5.5 mm screws and 3 or 4 8 mm screws . The trim piece, or cover, is over a foot wide and runs the entire width of the car. Remove the screws and bolts and you can access the drain petcock on the right hand (driver) side of the radiator . 19 mm head on the drain, which is an off-white plastic hex head on the underside of the radiator. (Note: some are attached with 5 7/32" head screws and 3 8mm head bolts. No Phillips screws at all.)

Remove the lower valance panel that runs across the bottom of the front end of the vehicle from the driver's side to the passenger's side. It is held on with three 8mm bolts and about a dozen 7/32 screws. After you remove that, then you will see the bottom of the radiator where there is a drain cock on the driver's side. It looks like a plastic bolt and takes a 3/4 wrench to open it.

Should be drain plug at lower radiator either at bottom or at rear may be hidden be lower hose or just remove lower hose

if i remember correctly its in the bottom of the radiator the under engine cover is in the way

:Yes, In order to access it you must first remove the air dam which is held to the bumper (on 1996-99's) by 5.5MM bolts and 3 SAE bolts (cannot remember the size. Will edit when i get it.) Once the lower air dam is removed the petcock can be seen, it simply unscrews to the left and drains out a spout.

Either at the bottom or rear of radiator

Drain radiator at bottom or rear of same

Remove the lower valance panel that runs across the bottom of the frontend of the vehicle from the driver's side to the passenger's side. It is held on with three 8mm bolts and about a dozen 5.5mm screws. After you remove that, then you will see the bottom of the radiator where there is a drain cock on the driver's side. It looks like a plastic bolt and takes a 3/4 wrench to open it. Some models have one that can be twisted open by hand.

There are a dozen tips/tricks/hints in the "Related Question" below for finding and accessing the 1996 and newer Taurus/Sable radiator drain plug / petcock

when looking at the car from the front...it's at the bottom of the radiator on the driver's side.

See "Related Questions" below for more

The radiator drain plug for a 2001 Taurus is located underneath the car on the bottom of the radiator on the driver side of the car. It is very hard to see and get to. You must first remove the plastic cover that is attached to your front bumper. Take it completely off, then look underneath the car on the driver side. On the bottom of the radiator you should notice a white plastic nut. It is easily removed with a 9/16 wrench.

This was a great answer and saved me a lot of time. The only difference was that on my 2001 Taurus SES with 3.0 Flex Fuel Engine was that the white plastic nut took a 3/4 wrench. Also, the plastic cover that's attached to the front bumper is also attached to the plastic fender wells with one screw per fender.

It is located at the bottom of the radiator on the driver's side of the vehicle. If you look straight up from the ground under the front of the car, you will see a black plastic panel that spans the distance form one side of the car to the other. This panel can be removed for easier access to the radiator petcock. The panel is held on with approximately eight to ten 7/32 (very small) screws, and three 5/16ths bolts. This car's petcock is not a wingnut type, but is plastic and in the shape of a bolt head, and will require a 3/4 inch wrench to loosen.

I would suggest you take it to a auto shop and have a flush done as draining the radiator really does little for you. There is still a large amount of the coolant in the engine and in the heater core that does not get changed and will contaminate your new coolant as soon as your thermostat opens. Also draining the radiator does not remove very much of the deposits that are built up in the system.

Check at the bottom of radiator perhaps under lower hose

See "Related Questions" below for more

The radiator drain plug for a 2001 Taurus is located underneath the car on the bottom of the radiator on the driver side of the car. It is very hard to see and get to. You must first remove the plastic cover that is attached to your front bumper. Take it completely off, then look underneath the car on the driver side. On the bottom of the radiator you should notice a white plastic nut. It is easily removed with a 9/16 wrench.

This was a great answer and saved me a lot of time. The only difference was that on my 2001 Taurus SES with 3.0 Flex Fuel Engine was that the white plastic nut took a 3/4 wrench. Also, the plastic cover that's attached to the front bumper is also attached to the plastic fender wells with one screw per fender.

It is located at the bottom of the radiator on the driver's side of the vehicle. If you look straight up from the ground under the front of the car, you will see a black plastic panel that spans the distance form one side of the car to the other. This panel can be removed for easier access to the radiator petcock. The panel is held on with approximately eight to ten 7/32 (very small) screws, and three 5/16ths bolts. This car's petcock is not a wingnut type, but is plastic and in the shape of a bolt head, and will require a 3/4 inch wrench to loosen.

I would suggest you take it to a auto shop and have a flush done as draining the radiator really does little for you. There is still a large amount of the coolant in the engine and in the heater core that does not get changed and will contaminate your new coolant as soon as your thermostat opens. Also draining the radiator does not remove very much of the deposits that are built up in the system.

829830831
Ford Taurus
Mercury Sable

How do you remove a door panel on a Ford Taurus - Mercury Sable?

Removing the Door Panel
  1. Remove triangle-shaped plastic cover forward of door window (speaker cover on some models) - gently pry it off
  2. Remove screw from the plastic cover behind door open lever / handle
  3. Remove door lock plunger. (unscrew)
  4. Remove screws down inside the door pull hand-hold area
  5. Look for other Phillips screws, 2 or 3, around the lower 1/2 of the panel
  6. Pry hidden plastic hold down fasteners from around the edge - pull the panel away from the door and where you see it 'stuck' to the door, slide a pry tool, a stiff putty knife works well, up in that area and pop the fastener off.
Answerremove the 2 screws from the door handle and then just pull the panel, it has plastic clips inside that you just push back in to lock. AnswerFirst remove all the screws on the door panel. Then take a big screwdriver or door puller and start at the bottom and pop the 10 clips along the bottom and sides of the door. Lift the door panel up and over the handle and door lock and the top clips should come off also. Be careful as there may be wires attached to the door panel for windows and door lights. AnswerThe door panel is simply held on by some plastic clips that pop in or out of place. Remove the two black screws that hold on the panel (one on the left edge, one on the right edge. Then remove the screw at the bottom of the place where your fingers go when you close the dorr from the inside, then remove the piece of plastic trim that goes around the inside door handle. This pops out from the top of the trim piece, not the bottom. A small flathead screwdriver is all that is needed to pry up the top portion of the trim piece.

After the three screws and th trim piece is removed, you can pull gently from one of the lower corners to release the first plastic snap, just work your way around the panel till all the clips have been released.

The electrical connectors come off by pushing the small button on the top of the electrical connector then pulling on the connector to remove it from the base while pushing the button down.

AnswerIt is suggested that you first disconnect the negative battery cable.

Then look around and you will see some screws... anywhere from five to seven of them. Remove those.

There are five plastic push pins (from 2000 and on) that need to be pried loose. Use a flat pry bar and start at the bottom and pry the panel away from the door. The male part of the pin will stay with the panel, and the female part will stay in the door. Move slowly around the door and take your time. You may have to pry harder than you might expect. Be careful, as plastic gets old and brittle with time.

Disconnect the electrical connectors, and you're done.

It's pretty easy. There are 6 (if I recall) screws. Just get them out and then use a small pry bar (or butter knife) and work your way around popping out the hidden plastic fasteners. Start at the bottom right side of the panel. Don't be afraid to give it a yank.

After this is done, just lift up to release it at the top. There are two electrical connectors to unhook once the panel is loose. Install in reverse order, beginning with top first.

goto your local library and find a manual. It will show you where all the clips and screws are. After that you just have to pop the clips off gently but firmly so you minimize damage to them.

Answerhey i just dismantled my door panel for my 97 Ford Taurus because i have to change my window motor. It pops right off,it's only being conected by plastic fasteners and if you ruin any of the fasteners you can buy them at an auto part store.You can just use a flat head screwdriver, put it in between the panel and the actual door and push forward or towards you and it should pop right off

Get a flathead screw driver and a cloth. Cover the screwdriver with the cloth, and gently go around the outside of the panel, insert the screwdriver behind the panel and gently pop out the retaing clips. The plastic clips do brek easy so you have to be as firm, yet careful as you can.

Answerbelieve it or not, they just pop off. they are held on by ittle plastic buggers that look like screws. make sure to unscrew everywhere that has one, then it just pops right off. be careful, the plastic holders are easy to snap and strip.
793794795
Headlights Tail and Brake Lights
Ford Taurus
Ford Expedition XLT
How To

How to change headlight headlamp bulb on 1996-1999 Taurus?

# Make sure headlamp is off and open hood.

# Facing the driver's side headlamp, and looking at the headlamp itself, at clock positions 8, 11 and 1 are the headlight housing screws. They all look the same. Using a 10mm socket wrench, remove these 3 screws and set them aside.

# Just to the right of the "11 o'clock" housing screw is a clinch bolt (same hexagonal 10mm sized top as the housing screws). This just needs a few turns to loosen it. As soon as you loosen that up the whole assembly comes right out.

# Gently pull the whole headlight forward. Now you can get at the bulb.

# Disconnect the electrical connector from the bulb. Now the headlamp is free to work with.

# Remove the bulb from the lamp assembly by pulling straight back.

Do not twist, as there are alignment slots built into the lamp assembly socket. It may take some effort to remove the lamp because it has a rubber o-ring type seal - try a bit of wiggling side-to-side while pulling

# Insert new bulb into headlight assembly - don't touch the glass - use gloves, paper towel, or similar

Make sure that the flat surface of the bulb socket is facing upward, and is firmly seated

# Re-attach retainer ring by rotating clockwise

# Reconnect the electrical harness

# Place headlamp back into position. Line up screw holes. Tighten the clinch bolt. Replace housing screws and tighten.

Passenger side headlamp is mirror image of driver's side. Screws at 11, 1 and 4 o'clock positions. Bolt should be to the left of the "1 o'clock" housing screw.

* Do not touch the glass of the new halogen bulb - the oils in the skin will shorten the life-span of the new bulb, or possibly cause the bulb to explode when first turned on

If the bulb is accidentally touched, it should be cleaned with rubbing alcohol before being used

Bulb Numbers:

* FRONT Turn-signal - 3457 AK (amber) * Headlamp - 9007 QL (9007LL optional) * Tail lamp/brake/turn lamp 3157 * Tail lamp/brake lamp (wagon) 3157 * Rear turn lamp (wagon) 3456K * Backup lamp 921 * Backup lamp (wagon) 3156 * License plate lamp (2) 168 * High-mount brake lamp (2) 912 * Rear side marker lamp (wagon) (2) 168 The above information extracted from the Owners Manuals (see below) == == == ==





1. Make sure headlamp is off and open hood. 2. Taurus model years 1990-1999: you must remove the whole headlamp to replace the bulb. Not a horrible task. Just annoying. 3. Facing the driver's side headlamp, and looking at the headlamp itself, at clock positions 8, 11 and 1 are the headlight housing screws. They all look the same. Using a 10mm socket wrench, remove these 3 screws and set them aside. 4. Just to the right of the "11 o'clock" housing screw is a bolt (same hexagonal 10mm sized top as the housing screws). This just needs a few turns to loosen it. 5. Gently pull the whole headlight forward. Now you can get at the bulb. 6. Disconnect the electrical connector from the bulb. Now the headlamp is free to work with. Remove the bulb, replace with a new bulb, make sure the bulb housing cylinder is in place and reconnect the electical. 7. Place headlamp back into position. Line up screw holes. Tighten the bolt. Replace housing screws and tighten. 8. Passenger side headlamp is mirror image of driver's side. Screws at 11, 1 and 4 o'clock positions. Bolt should be to the left of the "1 o'clock" housing screw.

748749750
Ford Taurus
Transmission Fluid

How do you change the transmission oil and filter on a Ford Taurus - Mercury Sable?

See "Related Links" for a photo How-to tutorialProcedures

You will be removing the transmission pan, and draining the transmission fluid (so make sure you have several quarts of new transmission fluid ready). The pan is attached to the bottom of the transmission by 17 or 19 (depending on the transmission model) 8mm bolts. Assuming you don't also want to do a full flush of the transmission fluid (which would be desirable if the transmission fluid is visibly oxidized (brownish with little or no sign of its original red-clear color)), do the following:

  • Raise the car's front end: either drive up onto drive-on ramps, or jack up the front of the car using a floor jack (check data on your model's proper front jacking point, though usually it's the strong front frame piece behind the radiator), then slowly lower the car onto suitable jack stands placed under the two side frame pieces near the front wheels. Don't rely just on a jack, even a good one, to keep a car raised.
  • Get a large container, at least 6 liter, to put under the pan as a drain bucket.
  • Remove the pan's bolts, starting with the ones closest to the passenger side. Remove the 6 bolts around the corner of the pan. This will allow the fluid to start to drain and not make too much mess. Catch the fluid in the drain bucket.
  • Start removing the remaining bolts, but leaving in place the bolts on the driver's side of the pan. This allows the pan to drop slowly and drain out most of the fluid.
  • Let it drain about 10 minutes.
  • Remove the remaining bolts, while holding up the pan with one hand. When you get to the last bolt, slowly let the pan down and hang on the last bolt.
  • Remove the last bolt, and lower the pan into the drain bucket.
  • Examine the bottom of the pan for metal shavings. Many or all will collect on a magnet that normally sits in the pan. If you see metal shavings, the transmission is damaged and may need repair.
  • Remove the filter: it turns to the side to remove it from its retaining clip and just pulls down to remove. Be sure the rubber o-ring seal comes off too--if it doesn't, pry it off with a screwdriver. It will often be a metal band coated with rubber.Sometimes only part of the seal will come off, which will prevent the new filter from fitting onto this location.
  • Let the fluid drain some more, for a while, until draining stops.
  • Clean the pan using brake cleaner, and the two mating surfaces for the new gasket. There's normally no need to clean other parts of the transmission.
  • Install the new filter: A new O-ring seal should be built into the new filter. If the new filter doesn't slide into place properly, often the cause is a remaining part of the old seal that hasn't been removed yet.
  • Put the new gasket in place on the pan (if the pan's old gasket is cork, replace it with a new rubber gasket (which comes with most new filters), but if the old gasket is rubber, you can re-use it if you don't have a new gasket), then place the pan against the bottom of the transmission. Manually thread (finger-tight) a few bolts in place to hold it, then manually install the remaining bolts, again finger-tight.
  • If you have a torque wrench, tighten the pan's bolts to nine foot-pounds. To prevent the gasket from deforming and allowing leaks, start with the middle bolt that's along the edge of the pan closest to the middle of the car, then the bolt farthest from this one on the opposite edge, then the two bolts at the middle of the other two sides, then back to another bolt on the pan's inner edge; repeat this alternating pattern until you're done. Do NOT overtighten the bolts, since they can break and strip easily, and deform the gasket too.
  • Once you've reinstalled the pan, add 5 liters of new transmission fluid before you start the car. Check your car's owner's manual for the proper type of transmission fluid, since variations in models and their transmissions may not always make this determination easy. However, in general, for Taurus transmissions made in 1996 and earlier, use regular Mercon (NOT Mercon V), or Dexron III, or F type fluid. For transmissions made in 1997 and later, use only MERCON V fluid. Using the wrong fluid can cause your transmission to burn out.

    NOTE: Ford issued a TSB regarding the phasing out of Mercon, and specifying Mercon V as the replacement fluid for 1986-1997 Taurus/Sable (and most all Ford car products). Refer to TSB linked below

  • Start the car, and let it run until normal operating temperature is reached (usually 15 minutes is enough). Then check the transmission fluid level using the transmission dipstick, and add more fluid in small amounts (one ounce at a time is good) until it reads full. DON'T OVERFILL THE TRANSMISSION FLUID (as shown on the dipstick), as this can eventually damage your transmission. If you overfill, drain some out until the proper level is reached.

    Filter Prices

    A check of Autozone & O'Riely's shows: $12, $18 & $29 (Motorcraft)

Check with auto parts to make it has a filter -- some do not If so drain and remove transmission oil pan Clean oil pan Filter should be held in place by 2 bolts Remove bolts and filter should pull out Replace filter and "O" Ring Install new gasket and replace oil pan

I'll take a stab at this one since i just did this on our 1988 mercury sable 3.8l with AXOD transmission. i assume your transmission will be similar.

The oil pan from the transmission must be removed. It can be a messy job because there are no drain plugs in the transmission oil pans. i think that's so the filter HAS to be changed each time the oil is changed.

TIP - I got around the ultra messiness of it all by using a device called a "dock mate" which is used on boat engines. On boats you change the oil by putting a plastic tube down the dipstick, then pumping on the dock mate to create a vacuum. if you do this when the oil is hot, it comes out really fast, like in a couple of minutes. By doing this first, the oil pan had much less oil in it.

  • Remove the bolts from the oil pan. You may wish to wait until it has cooled.
  • The filter is on the bottom of the transmission, which was covered up by the oil pan. Our transmission had a clip on the filter, which you just move out of the way & the filter pulls straight down.

    NOTE: Check to make sure the O-ring that is on the filter did not stay up in the hole. It did when i changed it, so i just used a small tool to pull it out, being careful not to scratch the walls.

    The transmission fluid pan gasket comes with the filter and O-ring. ours was about $11.50 @ NAPA>

  • I cleaned out the bottom of the pan and the bottom of the transmission lines. There might be some light gray colored material. this is pretty normal, as long as it is like a liquid, not pieces you can see.
  • Then you are to put the new filter in with the new O-ring, and clean the bottom of the pan with a solvent, then air dry with waterless air. You should also do this to the bottom of the transmission. i just used lens paper. the idea is not to leave any lint.
  • Put the new gasket on ( ours was cork, which is much cheaper). I applied some black Permatex non-hardening sealant to the bottom side of the gasket & the pan & let them sit until tacky, then mated them. on the top of the gasket I put a light coating of wheel bearing grease. The idea for that is so the gasket doesn't stick to the transmission when you change it next time.

    NOTE: The directions actually said to use NO sealants of any kind, but i got my ideas off the web. It held anyway.

  • Next, bolt the pan back up using a cross-pattern so as not to warp the pan. use a torque wrench. the specs for the AXOD are 12.5 ft/lbs (actually 10-15 ft./lbs.)

Then you are done & can have a nice cold margarita ( no salt on mine, please)..

OK, now this question has been ed. Jenni

You'll have to take it to a dealership and ask to have a transmission flush. It used not to be possible to get ALL the fluid out unless the transmission was completely removed from the vehicle which could cause other problems if all the outer seals were not replaced.You could get most of it out by draining the pan and the Torque Converter. However, there is no longer a drain plug on most torque converters these days so a flush is just about the only way to do it with the transmission still in the vehicle. It is a fairly new procedure that is now possible thanks to the new flushing machine which hooks up to your cooling lines (the metal tubing that runs from your transmission to your radiator).

I have been a mechanic for MANY years and as stated, the flushes havent been around very long. I have changed just 4-6 quarts of fluid for many years and have had no ill effects from just changing that much especially if it is done every 30,000 miles. This is MY 2 cents worth. Good luck, Joe

747748749
Ford Taurus

Why does the door ajar light stay on and the over head light in a Ford Taurus?

== == This is a common problem and is caused by the door switch plunger sticking (due to dirt, other elements or rust). This can often be corrected by performing the following: 1. Thoroughly spray the door switches (on each door) with: * Cleaning spray - clear the sludge out of the mechanism - electronic contact cleaner, carb, brake, etc

* Air, canned or even better, from a compressor

* Spray lubricant - a dry lube (best), silicone spray, WD-40 or similar

2. Open and close each door several times to work the lube into the mechanism This is usually sufficient to clean the electrical & plunger mechanism inside the door switch. If this doesn't work, you could remove the door panel and do the spray treatment from the inside also.

This approach works for most, but the switch may have to come out for repair (see Windstar "Related Question" below), or replacement. I just bought a 1998 Ford Taurus SE and right away I noticed the Dome light wasn't even coming on. The 2 map lights did work. I asked the previous owner about it, but he had no idea. Today I bought a new bulb and noticed that the light stays on forever, and the door ajar icon stays lit. I read through some of the responses posted for the problem, so I tried the WD-40 idea and it fixed it in 30 seconds. What you need to do is spray light lubricant (WD-40) on the drivers door latch. This is right at the end of the door (where is swings away from the car). You'll see the latch looks like plastic. Give it a few sprays, then open and close the door several times. If it works, the light should go off in about 30 seconds, and the door ajar light will go out. What must be happening is that the door closes, but something is sticking, not allowing the switch in the door to close. Spraying on the lubricant loosens this up, and in my case fixed it right away. Hope this helps. Regards, Doug The door ajar switch on each door sends a signal to the GEM module that the door(s) is ajar and this module illuminates the door ajar light and the interior courtesy/map lights. I would suspect that it's more likely one or more of your door ajar switches inside the doors, located on the backside of the door latch assemblies are sticking.

Relay switch for the door ajar light is bad.it is located above the fuse box.have 96 ford Taurus same problem ---- Taurus everything - http://www.taurusclub.com/forum/index.php? A switch on the light itself is on, a bad door switch that is grounding all the time, if controled from dash light dimmer switch, is it turned on. Any possiblity dome light is in contact with roof and grounding out there? The light should have power to it all the time and the door switches provide the ground. its build into the mechanism, you need to remove door panel and get a llight and look inside unplug it turn it a quarter turn left ir right depending on the door once out shoot a little WD40 on it the little ball is usuall stuck or buy one at dealer they are only like 20$ I have a 96 Taurus GL and the the door switch is integrated into the door latch itself. If you are having problems with your dome light staying on and the door open indicator being lit with all the doors closed, you may try spraying some WD-40 into the latch to free up the switch. I know this because this has happened to me. If you need to replace the switch, you can remove the interior door panel and replace it from the inside. Hope that helps. The door switches are located inside the door right under the latch. They are a constant problem. Sometimes you can "ungum" them by soaking the latch mechanism in WD-40 or another brand of contact cleaner or rust penetrant. I had to do this on my 1998 Taurus SE. The switch is in the drivers door latching mechanism inside the door. Disconnect the battery, disassemble the drivers door inside door panel and you can get to the back side of the latching assembly. If I remember correctly, you need a Torx driver to remove the latching assembly from the outside of the door with the door open. I got a used latch from my local boneyard by slashing through the outside of a damaged door. It helped me see all of the rods and connectors hooked to the latching assembly. I replaced the assembly in my car with the used one and my "door indicator" problem went away. About 1 hour of work when you have the part. Steve WD-40 works best without having to replace any parts. Completely soak the hinges and open & close the door a few times, and the light should go away. My SHO had this same problem. If your interior lights are staying on, and "door ajar" iss lit up on dash, just take some WD40 and spray it into the latch assy. on all the doors. The switch is located in there and this will free it up so it works. I've had to do it to my 97 Taurus several times. First check to see if the light switch is not set to dome on, then check the door switches, they shut the light off when the door is closed.

Answer

The problem seems to be fixed now! I thought I had an electrical problem but it turned out to be more mechanical. I did what the person did that had the Ford truck, with the same problem. I used WD-40 on all 4 door latches. I had immediate and positive results. If things change I'll let you know.

660661662
Mercury Sable
Mitsubishi
Ford Taurus
Check Engine Light

What causes the check engine light to come on and how to read the trouble codes in a Taurus - Sable?

The check engine light (CEL for short) is triggered when one or more of the many sensors on the vehicle detects a not-normalreading,

There are 2 basic steps to determining the cause of the CEL coming on:

  1. Have the codes read - many places offer to read the engine codes for free. Autozone even provides a printout of the codes, and a short description of common causes
  2. Research those codes! Find out the true cause and reason for the not-normal reading. It is not often that the sensor itself is bad and requires replacing.

    There are countless sources of information on engine DTC (diagnostic trouble codes) on the internet - including WikiAnswers!

Real-life examples:

  • DTC code P0402 on 98 Tracer - replaced the EGR valve, light came back. Made my daughter live with it for 2 years. Yesterday I had a few minutes while waiting for the oil to drain and poked around the engine - found a small 2" piece of rubber hose that had softened and collapsed right where the PCV connects. A free piece of hose from Autozone and the light cleared after a few drive cycles!
  • Major auto parts chain told me my TSP (Throttle position sensor) was bad due to the CEL being lit up (might have been a P1120 DTC). $40 and 10 minutes to replace - ((_#*&$ light came right back. A few days ago, after doing some reading, I bought a $4 can of throttle body spray cleaner - used 1/2 the can on my 98 Sable - voila! CEL is gone again!

Pay attention to those check engine lights - they're there for a reason. And with the internet today, you can readily find the information to keep your car healthy, and even save some $$ in the process.

(end of editorial rant,... and no more acronyms!)

NOTE:This light has 2 other names it is referred to:
  • Service Engine Soon - SES
  • Malfunction Indicator Lamp - MIL
AnswerYour owner's manual will tell you. It more than likely means it is time to change the oil. It can also mean there is a problem with the emissions controls, depending on what term Ford uses. AnswerIf your car is a year 96 or newer, this usually means there is a problem with your emissions system. This light will also detect a problem with your transmission, as some transmission problems will in some way affect gas efficiency, therefore affecting emissions (i.e. problems with overdrive performance) I know, I'm having this problem now. I have a 97 Mercury Sable. AnswerCHECK FOR VACUUM LEAKS! Everytime my engine light comes on, I get it checked at Autozone and they always tell me its a vacuum leak. I then have to manually search for a "sssss" sound on every vacuum line and replace the hose. The first time this happened, I found a huge hole in the hose next to my PCV valve, causing that to clog. I would recommend checking there first.

You need to have it scanned,most of smaller repair shops will do it a reasonable price,and give you the trouble code.

Check engine light staying onYou need to go to a reputable shop and have them test the vehicle. They will use a scan tool to check for codes, then they will have an idea what system is causing the light to come on.

Just finding out the code doesn't tell what's wrong, so it may not be worth trying to buy a cheap "code reader". Find a shop you trust and take the vehicle to a professional.

AnswerThe scanner / code readers are very inexpensive now - I've seen them as low as $30. Autozone & Harbor Freight are just 2 places to look.

BEWARE - the parts stores are very happy to tell you the DTC code (Diagnostic trouble code), and then encourage you to buy the cited part.

For example, a P0171 or P0174 indicate an oxygen sensor issue - will buying and replacing the O2 sensor FIX the problem? NOT AT ALL LIKELY. Don't just blindly buy the part - been there, done that.

Get the codes read - then research them on the net or talk to a reliable mechanic.

Its the emissions light. On my mercury sable when I get bad gasoline the light tends to go on. Usually if I run the car almost empty and then fill up again it goes out. If not try disconecting the battery.

It could be one, more, or MANY things. That's why it is suggested that you take it to your dealer if it is still under warranty. You can take it to AutoZone and have your "Codes" (what causes the Check Engine Light or "SES" Service engine soon light) read.

It will usually tell you what caused the SES and it should be fairly simple to fix, such as a malfunctioning O2 Sensor.

Some things however can be very complex and it is recommended an AST Certified Mechanic takes a look at the vehicle.

most likely a severe engine misfire. you need to have it checked for codes

AnswerIt simply means that the engines computer is picking up a a problem from one of the sensors on the vehicles All of the sensors work together and feed their information to the Engines Computer (or ECU). The main reason for all of these sensors is to accomplish maximun fuel economy while buring as clean as possible thus keeping pollution and emissions to a minimal. AnswerThe light is on because the computer has detected a problem with the emissions system. This may be nothing more than a loose gas cap, or as serious as a bad catalytic converter. Have the computer scanned for fault codes. This will help to find the problem. After the problem is corrected the light can be reset with an OBD2 scan tool. AnswerPull the codes from the computer, match the code to the troubleshooting procedure, follow the procedure to find the source. Repair the source, light will go out if that was the only problem. There are "monitors" or self test the computer runs the car through, if a problem occurs, it may not run all of the self tests until that problem is taken care. Therefore, another problem may exist. It is emission related. See "Related Questions" below for moreAnswer

Open and read your owner's manual. There you will find the answer to your question. But I will tell you. The computer has detected a fault with the emissions system.

Answer

Pull the codes from the computer, match the code to the troubleshooting procedure, follow the procedure to find the source. Repair the source, light will go out if that was the only problem. There are "monitors" or self tests the computer runs the car through a drive cycle, if a problem occurs, it may not run all of the self tests until that problem is taken care. Therefore, another problem may exist. It is emission related. OR hook up a scanner that is capable of clearing codes, and hope that none are still active.

The " check engine light" is by far one of the most misunderstood technological advances by the public. I am sure I will revise this as time goes on, as it is an in-depth understanding for the public. It is a warning light that is illuminated when there is a problem with the EMISSION SYSTEM only. Emission system being the pollution control system. Don't get a hard on against it as it is a good thing once you understand it. One point that was brought up a a recent meeting of technicians was that the amount of hydrocarbons is greater when the gas cap is left off than when the engine is running. Hydrocarbons are part of pollution emitted as gasoline evaporates. Going a step farther, one facet of the emission system is the "Evaporative" portion. This is when the fumes from the gasoline are leaking from the system into the outside air. This is one part of the emission system that can trigger a check engine light. I would say that about 7% of the vehicles that have a check engine light are the result of a loose or inadequate gas cap. But understand that many scenarios are possible with the "check engine light" The vehicle's powertrain computer (note that some vehicles have 17 different computers) will run a series of self-tests. They will only run under certain criteria. And they can be vastly different from manufacturer to manufacturer. Some self-tests are not run until preceding ones have run successfully. So if there is a problem in one particular area that is preventing another self test from running, you can have a situation where one problem is fixed, but another still exists. If you fix a problem and drive the car through a drive cycle that sets the monitor (or self test) the light will go off as it passes that criteria that triggered it in the first place. After 1996, the auto industry went to a idea called OBD II (on board diagnostics). This was to get all the manufacturers onto a similar plane for troubleshooting and powertrain control. While they still differ vastly, many corrections and adaptations were made for technicians to better fix the check engine light problems. Prior to this there were so many different and poor troubleshooting data from a check engine light problem that resolving the problem was much more difficult. Many early warning light of this nature were set to illuminate based on mileage. An Oxygen sensor was one of the things that were meant to be replaced when that mileage was hit. This is much like many current "Change oil lights� that are set based on a pre-set mileage.

AnswerIt will be impossible to give you any better than a broad answer here, because there are literally hundreds of possibilities as to why a check engine light(CEL) comes on. The system would have to be scanned to retrieve whatever fail codes there are. Then we would use a manual (that is literally 3 inches thick)that contains flow charts with pinpoint tests, using a voltmeter, to hand diagnose, and find out what is wrong. This process can take a few minutes, it may take a couple of hours, depending on what is actually wrong.

Now here is the "why" of a CEL: What is actually turning on the CEL is the Powertrain Control Module(PCM), commonly known as the engine control computer. Inside of a PCM there are actually two separate systems. One is control, the other system is diagnostics. PCM diagnostics acts as "big brother," constantly looking over the shoulder of the control side of the PCM. Diagnostics is constantly monitering systems to see if the expected voltages and values are present. For example: If the PCM diagnostics knows that it has been so many minutes since the engine was first started, then the engine temperature should be around 195 degrees. In our senerio, if the engine is still 160 degrees, it sees a problem, and sets the CEL. The technician has to use pinpoint diagnostics to see if we have a stuck thermostat, if the Engine Coolant Temp(ECT) sensor if sending a false signal, if the wiring between the ECT and the PCM is bad, or if the PCM is faulty and interpreting the signal received from the ECT incorrectly. But the PCM is not capable of monitering everything all at once, so it basically goes down a checklist, over and over again, as you are driving down the road. Sometimes a problem can come and go intermittantly, at the right times so as to avoid detection by the PCM. That is why sometimes a CEL doesn't always come on everytime there is a problem. Sometimes you can unplug a sensor even while the car is running, and it takes a while for the CEL to come on, just because the PCM diagnostics hasen't gotten back around to looking at that area yet.

Our senerio only talked about one area that a PCM moniters. There are dozens of sub-systems that the PCM looks at, and dozens of possible failures within each of those sub-systems, that could cause a CEL.

Most often the cause of this light staying on is a bad EGR valve or a bad O2 sensor.

Y-THINK-Y

Answeryou might want to check your gas cap if it is loose it can trigger your check engine light
640641642
Ford Taurus
Mercury Sable

How do you fix a Taurus - Sable that is stuck in park?

Trick to get it out of park: Just turn key to ON position, put car in neutral, then start car.

I have had the exact same problem with a '94 Taurus. For me, the linkage had to be replaced. The linkage is the mechanism that connects the shift lever to the transmission.

Brake-shift interlock

This vehicle is equipped with a brake-shift interlock feature that prevents the gearshift from being moved from P (Park) unless the brake pedal is depressed.

If you cannot move the gearshift out of P (Park) with the brake pedal depressed:

1. Apply the parking brake, turn ignition key to LOCK, then remove the key.

2. Insert the key and turn it to OFF. Apply the brake pedal and shift to N (Neutral).

3. Start the vehicle.

If it is necessary to use the above procedure to move the gearshift, it is possible that a fuse has blown or the vehicle's brakelamps are not operating properly. Refer to Fuses and relays in the Roadside emergencies

It is probably like my 1998. There is a safety that won't let you shift unless the brake pedal is depressed. The same fuse for the brake lights is for the safety. If the fuse is good you might have to replace the safety that is connected above the brake pedal. You can usually override it by shifting while the car if off and key in accessory position.

If you have a console standard shift the push button on the shifter may not be releasing totally (specially if you have oem leather on it restricting its movement). Pry it loose. If not it might be your stop light switch if all your brake lights are not working.

There is a safety on the car that won't let you shift out of park unless the brake pedal is depressed. The fuse for the brake lights is the same one for that safety. Check to see if the fuse is good. If it is, then you might need to replace the safety that is connected above the brake pedal. Having the car off and key in axillary is overriding the safety. If you have the car owners manual it is described in there.

usually there is a lockout override (you can't shift out of park without the brake on), it will be a access in the console near the shifter, sometimes a slider or removable button that you can stick a key into to release the lock. check brakelight system, it usually powers the automatic release

check to see if you have brake lights. The brake light switch also sends power to the shifter lockout solenoid. Ususally the wiring at the connector to the brake light switch developes a break due to the constant movement of the brake pedal. If that happens or the brake light switch goes bad, or even if the fuse to the brake lights blows, you will be stuck in park.

The Break On/Off (BOO) switch has caused this problem for me. It's the only way that the rest of the car knows that you're pressing your brakes, thusly not letting you shift or triggering your brake lights when it is loose.

I've rather big feet, so I've kicked it loose several times since it first happened. It's a cheap little plastic connector on the brake pedal itself.

# Follow the pedal up to the wiring.

# Ensure that everything is plugged in properly.

# If the BOO switch is plugged in and the problem is still present, then is the time to check the fuse box according to the manual.

If you've never checked fuses for proper functioning, all you do is hold them up to the light to see that the connection is not broken within the fuse (ie, that the fuse is "blown")

631632633
Ford Taurus
Mercury Sable
Turn Signals and Hazard Lights

Where is the flasher located on a 1996-1999 Taurus - Sable?

What does it look like and where's it mountedThe flasher/turn signal is screwed into the metal support above the fuse panel, you must take the bottom of the dash off and remove the plastic cover. this is for a sable that has light out detection.

Look under your dash for a blue box screwed into the right side of the dash panel. This of course is done, with you laying on your back, and your feet in the back seat.

It's a blue box, about the size of half a twinkie (cream filled, golden sponge cake).

Remove the plug that holds it in, unscrew the screw that holds it to the frame, and go to Autozone or other parts store, to get a new relay.

You will have to reuse the metal piece that holds the relay to the dash panel, so be sure and save that before you throw the old part away.

Installation is the reverse.

First Squirt easing oil, No Kidding!Don't even try until you lubricate the "multifunction switch" behind the steering wheel, which usually causes this problem. Squirt easing oil into the hole where the Hazard switch sits. Be generous. Operate the switch repeatedly. Operate the turn-signal switch repeatedly. Add more easing oil if needed. If that doesn't work, get a replacement flasher from your local auto parts store for about $10 (or pay $40-50 at the Ford parts window). Look up under the dash to the left of the steering wheel for a blue plastic cube. Remove that and plug the replacement in. The easing oil trick worked for me!No kidding. It worked like a charm. I highly suggest trying it before you do anything else. easing oil also fixed my dome light switches. My Dome lights wouldn't turn off but after saturating the door latches on each door, the switches started working again. Fixing a Flasher on a 1996 Ford TaurusThe flasher (a single one for both turn signals and the hazard lights) is close under the dash left of the steering column. Original equipment is a blue plastic square that fits into a three-pole receptacle served by black, blue, and red-white wires.

But don't rush to replace it yet. First, do what my friend learned to do from WikiAnswers -- squirt easing oil down around the Hazard switch button behind the steering wheel, where the "multi-function switch" is located. Be generous with the lubricant. Soak the switch good. Work the hazard switch on and off a dozen times. Then work the turn signal switch right and left a dozen times. If nothing improves, let it sit a few minutes, then try the flashers again. Add more easing oil.

If you have to give up on easing oil, check the fuses for the hazard and the turn signals lights (separate fuses). If they're good, remove the flasher and replace it ($10 at your friendly universal after-market parts store, ($40-50 at your local Ford dealer). Save the receipt so you can return the flasher for a refund, as my friend did after easing oil did the trick.

TestimonialHoly Cow! I just happened to be stuck with my wife's Grandfather's 96 Taurus today and the turn signals and flashers didn't work. I followed the overly simple procedure in the preceding two paragraphs and it worked like a charm. Suhweeet! AnswerThe manual I have says the flasher assembly is under the drivers side of the instrument panel and it is held in by one retaining screw. It shows a small square unit with three blades which plug into a connector on the end of wire. It appears to be screwed into an under dash brace member which supports the instrument panel. My flasher is failing intermittently. I haven't gotten around to replacing it yet, so I can't guarantee this description is accurate. I hope this information helps. AnswerIndicator flasher assy 13550. This is an electronic combination turn signal and emergency warning flasher. It is attached on the left hand side of the instrument panel reinforcement above the fuse panel. The main wiring harness is assy 14401. AnswerIt could be the flasher, another fuse, the turn signal switch or an electrical connector. You will need to get a schematic for the turn signal system then track back to where you get power. Follow the line to the point where you no longer get power they you will have found the source of the problem. AnswerThe Flasher Relay is located behind the left side of the instrument panel.

There is no flasher on the 98 Sable, it has a LCM (Lighting Control Module) Dealer only item unless you wanna take a chance at the junk yard.

there is a light blue flasher relay under the steering wheel check and replace or check the fuse box in the same place

The flasher/turn signal is screwed into the metal support above the fuse panel, you must take the bottom of the dash off and remove the plastic cover. this is for a sable that has light out detection. Any questions, contact chrisvolkswagon@msn.com I know for Real. Look under your dash. Look for a Blue Box screwed into the right side of the dash panel. This of course is done, with you laying on your back, and your feet in the back seat. It sucks to get to, but it's the easiest to access once your under there. It's a blue box, about the size of half a twinkie. Remove the plug that holds it in, unscrew the screw that holds it to the frame, and go to Autozone to get a new relay. You will have to reuse the metal piece that holds the relay to the dash panel, so be sure and save that before you throw the old part away. Installation is the reverse. Be sure to read through the Related Question below on the Taurus - great tips & info that equally applies to the Sable. Flasher relay is located, behind left side of instrument panel. The Flasher sensor looks like a little aluminum can, and is located under the dash (provided they didn't include a dash cover) otherwise you'd have to unscrew it first from all it's mounting screws. The can is mounted on the steering column up a ways, (best way to see is to put your head up there, while your feet rest in the backseat, it's uncomfortable but it works. You'll see two cans, left/right, turn your key to the "on" position, and use the turn signals, and feel each can for a clicking feel/sound. Don't replace that one, unless you don't have turn signals either. Henceforth the other one is the Hazard/Flasher sensor. Pull out the wire clip (it's easier if you slide the can out of it's holding clip, pop in a new one, and get upright before you pass out. Check all of the fuses. If they are good change the flasher which is in the fuse box on some cars. The flasher on most cars is located around the fuse box under the dash, or attached to the underside of the dash. It is a small round cylindrical Can made of aluminum, or plastic.

Answer

If your turn signal flashers stopped working, play with the emergency flasher button on top of the steering column. Our 97 Sable turn signals quit once and luckily I pushed the emergency flasher button in and out many times and the signals have worked ever since. But the emergency flashers don't work, but I can live with that.

The turn signal flasher relay is located behind the left hand side of the instrument panel at the left hand side of the steering column.

IT'S USUALLY ON THE FUSE BLOCK UNDER THE DASH ON THE DRIVER'S SIDE. IT OFTEN LOOKS LIKE AN ALUMINUM CYLINDER(SILVER) AN SIMPLY PLUGS IN.

it is truly under the driver-side of the dashboard, but near the outer edge. it is truly a blue cube(original) and held in place with one 7mm screw into a built-in clip. it is left of the code-checking jack and the screw head faces down. once the screw is removed, the cube and harness drop down. there is no retaining clip-thank God-just carefully pry the three-prong cube away from the harness. now, my replacement cube didnt have a place on it for the clip, but the clip can be glued onto the new cube. or, ty-wrap the works in place....But,,, I did find that another's response was correct!!! i didnt need to change my flasher-the hazard switch WAS truly gummed-up!! i used a few drops of alchohol-not wd40 (that scares the electrician in me)-exercised the hazard and turnsignals feverishly and they began working miraculously! and , i appreciated other info on changing those pesky front turn signal lamps! it IS an easy job of removing the three bolts of the headlamp,removing the headlamp to get to the harness of the turn signal and voila!!! I'll even add that my signal lense was full of water, but nothing that a couple of well-placed weep holes didnt fix!! happy motoring!!!

I can;t believe it but the oil works. It worked in 10 seconds. Thanks for the quick fix!!

The flasher relay is located behind left side of instrument panel. Purchase the Relay and you will know what you are looking for.

583584585
Ford Taurus
Mercury Sable
Heater Cores and Blower Fans

How do you change the heater blower motor on a Taurus - Sable?

Recall and Technical Service Bulletin

The body style that ran from about '99-'03 had a issue with rain water getting into the blower case and ruining the blower resister assembly and the blower motor. There is a modified cowl cover that is supposed correct this condition. One tell tale sign that you have this problem is pull the blower resister assembly out and examine it. If it has corrosion or rust on the terminals, you have this problem. Replace the resister assembly, blower motor, and cowl cover.

There is a detailed posting on this problem in the "Related Links" below

It's very easy.

You'll see the round, black blower motor on the right side of the passenger side of the car, under the glove compartment.

Either remove the glove compartment door by taking out the three screws under the door itself (very easy) or gently push in the two retaining bars on either side of the glove box door and let the door drop down. I think removing the door is easier and more efficient.

There are three screws holding the motor in place. They are very obvious. Simply remove them (I think they are 9/32nd socket heads). Disconnect the wiring clip going to the motor (easy and pretty obvious). Then pull the motor out. It may feel like it's still attached, but if you took out all three screws, just a little pressure will get it out.

You may have to remove one of the plastic one-way fasteners holding the plastic piece under the glove box in order to get the motor out. I had to do this. Gently, but firmly pull the plastic piece until the plastic fastener comes out of it's hole. Or you can snip the fastener shaft. You'll have to replace the fastener if you do this.

Then just reverse everything and your motor is back in place. Answer

Look under the passenger's side dash, just below the glove box area. There may be a plastic shield underneath, that you remove by simply tugging down on it. On the heater box, you will see the blower motor held in with four 8mm hex head screws. Disconnect the electrical connector, remove the screws, remove, and replace the blower motor. It should take you about 15 minutes. It's pretty simple.

The blower motor is under right-hand side of the dash, remove panel to see it. If you want got to mechanixtrix.com they have pictures of it and how to remove it. Also check cowl panel on right-hand side it may be warped allowing water to enter and causing blower motor to break.

1. Disconnect the negative battery terminal. 2. Disengage the instrument panel insulator from the instrument panel 3. Detach the wiring connector at the blower motor. 4. Remove the 3 screws retaining the blower motor to the evaporator housing and remove the blower motor and wheel assembly. 5. If required, separate the blower motor wheel form the blower motor by removing the retainer from the blower motor shaft and sliding the blower motor wheel off the blower motor shaft.

Reverse to install.

I have the same problem with my 1989. I had to take the glove box out to get to it. But before you purchase the actual blower motor, take a tester to the wiring that goes to it (starting at the blower motor end and make sure its not one of the coiled looking "resistors" along the way or the switch) Turned out on mine that its not the blower motor itself, but something in the switch or the path of wiring to the blower motor. Sorry not more help.

Cathy

The blower motor is located in the a/c evaporator housing on the passengers side under the dash.

Remove the cover from under the glove compartment on passenger side. Once removed the blower motor is towards the passenger door. Unplug the blower motor and remove the 3 screws from the housing. Pull the motor out and reverse order of removal. Some brand new motors don't come with the fan, so you might have to take old fan off from old motor and reattach to new motor. Is very simple just be careful when taking clip off of shaft holding the fan on.

Chck behind the glove box area

575576577
Timing and Firing Orders
Ford Taurus

What is the cylinder layout and firing order for Ford Taurus 3.0 and 3.8 engines?

Ford settled on uniform firing orders covering many many years of vehicles:

2.5L Engine: 1-3-4-2

V6 3.0, 3.8: 1-4-2-5-3-6

Taurus SHO V-8: 1-5-4-2-6-3-7-8

V6 Cylinder numbering:

1 - 2 - 3

4 - 5 - 6

(Front of Vehicle)

The coil pack looks like this

--4 pin--

-----------------

--1--- 2--- 3--

----------------

--5--- 6--- 4--

----------------- Coil: with the connector positioned in the lower right hand corner, the upper row from left to right is: 4-6-5. The lower row is 3-2-1. ---- == == * http://autorepair.about.com/library/firing_orders/bl-ford-firing-02.htm

* http://autorepair.about.com/od/enginefiringorders1/ == == ---- The distributor cap should have a number one stamped on it indicating which one is number one. if not you should go and get a ford factory cap and it will tell you. Alternatively, the distributor has 2 screws to hold it down - starting from the back screw to the right going clockwise is 3-5-2-4-1-6 ---- * To aid in installation and avoid confusion, remove and tag the spark plug wires one at a time.

* Use di-electric grease on the plug wires to help keep them from sticking for future ease of changing

* A bit of anti-seize compound on the plugs - again to avoid future problems

The firing order is Cylinders 1-4-2-5-3-6 ---- Change one - AND JUST ONE - spark plug wire at a time. Route the new wire EXACTLY as you took the old one off. Shouldn't take you more than 10 - 15 minutes. (must be referring to the Vulcan engine ;)) 1,4,2,5,3,6 Look here for Taurus / Sable firing orders: http://autorepair.about.com/library/firing_orders/bl-ford-firing-99.htm 1,4,2,5,3,6 the firing order is 1,4,2,5,3,6 and the cylinders are numbered 1-3 up the back side starting at the belt area, and 4-6 are up the front side, starting at the belt area. yes. go to your local autozone and buy a haynes repair manual. it will give u the firing order and anything else you need to kno. 1 - 4 - 2 - 5 - 3 - 6




firing order is 1-3-4-2. fairly certain on that.





1 - 4 - 2 - 5 - 3 - 6

531532533
Ford Taurus
VW New Beetle
Ford Expedition XLT
Late Model 1979-New Ford Mustangs

How do you remove the door panel and replace the side mirror on a Taurus - Sable?

The best description of this procedure, including photos, I have found is at kwmuth.com. Just follow the first 14 steps and then reverse them to install your new mirror assembly.

See "Related Questions" below for direct link to the pdf file

ok, it is very simple. all you have to do is take off the door panel, and if you have the tweeter in the corner of the door, you are going to have to take the screen off and undo the bolts, then there are 3 bolts that hold the mirror on..... i would recommend to take a digital camera with you so you can take pictures of everything and that way you will be able to put everything back in place..

autozone.com has online manuals that give step by step how to

Removing the Door PanelIt's easy!
  1. Remove triangle-shaped plastic cover Fwd of door window - gently pry it off
  2. Remove screw from the plastic cover behind door open lever
  3. Remove door lock plunger. (unscrew)
  4. Remove screws down inside the door pull hand-hold area
  5. Look for other Phillips screws - sometimes around the lower 1/2
  6. Pry hidden plastic hold down fasteners from around the edge - pull the panel away from the door and where you see it 'stuck' to the door, slide a pry tool, a stiff putty knife works well, up in that area and pop the fastener off.
  7. Lift door liner enough to get to the mirror power connector and unplug.
  8. For some model years, with door panel loose, you can access the bolts / screws that hold the interior trim piece in place and remove.
  9. Remove Mylar cover for access to 3 Mirror mount studs, speaker screws, door lock actuators, window motors, etc.
  10. Remove nuts, (hold the mirror up from outside) and remove mirror. (Feed electrical harness through door openings as required to facilitate removal.
  11. Reverse order for installation.
96, 97 or 98 side mirror replacementFirst You have to pop the black cover off the speaker "triangle". That way you can get at the screws that hold the speaker bracket (2 or 3). Under that, and through access holes in the door, are three nuts that hold the mirror on 13mm I think. You will need a ratchet an deep socket or 2" extention. Take care not to dropthe nuts; there may be places they can go beyond the ken of men. The bad news is that I think you will have to pop the inside door skin to disconnect the cable . I just did this about two weeks ago, but I'm not sure sitting here at the computer. The door I replaced my poor door with was a 1996. My Taurus is a 1998. So there are minor variations. The '98 had three screws through the edge of the skin to hold the door skin besides the plastic reuseable grip plugs you can't see until the skin is removed. It would be an easy 15 min job if not for the skin. .

To take of the inside panel just remove the screws under the panel, on the left side, and one (that is hard to get to) on the inside. I don't know how to get to the mirror tho. If you know how to get that far can you email me at Chriscox06@yahoo.com I need to replace my whole mirror setup. I and if you already knew this, sorry i couldn't help.

In general, the primary mounting screws for the side mirror are under the triangle cover piece - often that is held in place with a single screw itself.

I have found the electric connector to be fairly short, so it may be possible to replace the mirror without removing the door panel.

Remove the speaker cover by carefully prying it off. From the inside of the car, remove the three nuts that attach the mirror bolts. Remove mirror. Re-install the same way.

go to a pic ur part junk yard and find a new one pull the wires out through the door panel its easy

515516517
Starters and Ignition Systems
Ford Taurus
Mercury Sable

Where to find and how to replace the starter on a Taurus - Sable?

What does a starter cost? 1998 DOHC: Autozone has two offerings: $135 for a re-manufactured unit and $155 for brand new

What about the starter solenoid? The starter solenoid is integrated into the body of the starter, and cannot be replaced separately. You will need to replace the entire starter assembly.

New Answer It is simple to replace. They are located at the front of engine.

  • Disconnect Negative Battery cable first,
  • raise vehicle and support vehicle,
  • remove the electrical wires from starter,
  • remove mounting bolts (2 or 3) and remove starter.
I know this because I used to work on them. Answer Remove - battery cable

Raise and support vehicle

Disconnect wiring harness at top of starter

Remove starter mounting bolts

Remove starter Where to find the starter the easiest way to find the starter on any vehicle is to follow the wire directly from the battery down to the starter, it may go from the battery to a junction post used for jump-starting, but it will go from there to the starter because you need a direct flow of current from the battery to turn the starter over. Starters are typically found at the front - bottom of the engine.

Note that the front end of the starter inserts into the place where the transmission and engine join up, so look in the middle section At the end of the rad battery cable coming off the battery. Answer Disconnect Battery First It's simple. 2 bolts, two wires. Raise the front of the car, put jackstands underneath. Crawl under the front, look up, there is the starter. Remove the two wires, note their positions, one is big, the other is small. Remove the two bolts, remove the starter, be careful not to let it drop on your head, it might hurt. Replace the install the two bolts, install the two wires(they will only go on one way). Lower the car, reconnect the battery, and Voila! 30 minutes later, you are done! Go get an ice cream or a soda, you deserve a reward! Remove one post from battery then wire connections from starter. Remove mounting bolts and remove starter. Towards the front of the car about a foot back from the radiator bolted to the engine/trans.; it is accessible from underneath.

Sable Starter The starter on a 96 Sable with a 3.0 litre is at the front of the engine (looking down on the engine compartment with the hood open standing at the front of the car) where th engine and transaxle bolt together.To lay down under the bumper and looking up is the best way to view. Answer It's simple. 2 bolts, two wires. Raise the front of the car, put jackstands underneath. Crawl under the front, look up, there is the starter. Remove the two wires, note their positions, one is big, the other is small. Remove the two bolts, remove the starter, be careful not to let it drop on your head, it might hurt. Replace the install the two bolts, install the two wires(they will only go on one way). Lower the car, reconnect the battery, and Voila! 30 minutes later, you are done! Go get an ice cream or a soda, you deserve a reward! Answer Disconnect the battery, raise the front end and crawl under the car. The starter is bolted to the transmission bellhousing, and will be held on with either 2 or 3 bolts. There will be two wires going to the starter, one held on with a 13mm nut, the other held on with either an 8mm or a 10mm nut, or it may have a small spade type connector. There will also be a ground wire attached to one of the starter bolts with a nut. Disconnect the two wires and the ground wire, unbolt the starer, and replace. It is noyt difficult, and it will probably take you about 30 mins to do, once you figure our what tools you need, which you should be able to do everything with a basic socket set, as long as you have some deep well sockets. Answer It's simple. 2 bolts, two wires. Raise the front of the car, put jackstands underneath. Crawl under the front, look up, there is the starter. Remove the two wires, note their positions, one is big, the other is small. Remove the two bolts, remove the starter, be careful not to let it drop on your head, it might hurt. Replace the starter, install the two bolts, install the two wires(they will only go on one way). Lower the car, reconnect the battery, and Voila! 30 minutes later, you are done! Go get an ice cream or a soda, you deserve a reward! Answer The solenoid is part of the starter. Replace the entire starter. It is located next to the oil filter at the front of the motor. Follow the positive battery cable; it will first lead to the starter solenoid and then continue to the starter.

Disconnect the - battery cable Raise and support vehicle Remove wiring from top of starter Remove starter mounting bolts Remove starter

Answer - 1992 remove + battery cable remove starter, I used a 3 foot extension to get to the one nasty bolt in back, put just in front of the left front tire..sometimes it pays not to get too close to your work!! Its not hard, but access to bolts are terrible. It look simple till you try and get a socket or wrench on the nut/bolt!! install new starter, hookup wires at starter, then battery+. crank, crank, zoom,zoom [with the 3.8] Inspect for damaged wiring in the harness for the starter. Sharp corners can cut..

Depends what year is it, on a 1998 it's at the bottom by the oil pan and there are three bolts

The starter is located just underneath the oil filter.

This is a fairly simple repair. You will need a socket set (you can do it with wrenches if you have to, but sockets make it much easier) and a jack.

1. Disconnect the negative terminal from the battery.

2. The starter is located directly below the oil filter. It is held on by two bolts which are to the right of the oil filter. One is easiest reached from the top of the car and the other from the bottom. If you have trouble locating the bolts, just take a look at your new starter to determine where the bolts are located. The bolts screw in from the driver's side of the car.

3. Once the bolts are off, the starter should be loose from the engine. (You can thank the designers at Ford for making this a particularly dirty job. The starter gets doused with oil every time the oil filter is taken off so get you can expect the bolts and the starter to be covered in grease and gunk.)

4. Maneuver the starter so that the terminals facing up so you can easily get to them from the top of the engine compartment. Pull the terminal cover off. Remove both cables from the starter. The starter should now be completely free.

5. Place the cables on your new starter and replace the terminal cover. Bolt the starter back in same position as the old one.

6. Reconnect the negative battery terminal and start the car.

Remove the Negative(black) wire off the battery Raise and support the car. using a 10mm wrench remove the smaller cable going to the starter. using a 13mm wench/socket remove the larger cable that comes strait from the Positive (Red) terminal of the battery from the Starter using a 13 mm wench remove the lower and upper starter bolts. The heads for these are on the engine side of the starter. They will likely be hard to turn at first.

the starter should now be easy to remove. Compare the old and new starter to make sure they match, then do the above steps in reverse.

498499500
Ford Taurus
Mercury Sable
Radio

How do you remove the radio from a 1986-1995 Taurus-Sable?

Use the removal tools to pull the radio assembly out of the dash - note: you do NOT need to remove the plastic trim piece! :)

  • Insert the tools into each pair of small holes on either side of the radio face
  • They're all the way in when you feel them hit an indent, or a bit of 'click'
  • Push the tops of the tools to the *OUTSIDE* while pulling the radio out from the dash. This is more "art" & feel than specific instructions.

- Disconnect the 2 or 3 wire harness connectors off & disconnect the radio antenna wire.

As you can imagine, re-installing is just a matter of connecting the wire harnesses & antenna - align and push the radio back in until you hear/feel the side-clips click back into place.

TIPS:

  • Be sure to spend the few dollars for the wire harness kit - This saves you from having to CUT the factory wiring. If you sell the car, it takes only 10 minutes to put the factory radio back.
  • Many places even give you the radio removal tools when you buy a radio from them, like Crutchfield.com
  • Do not try to save a few dollars and spend far more than $5 worth of your time with home made tools

In my opinion, the only way to properly install an after-market CD player in any vehicle would be to make a trip to your local electronics store and buy the adapter (harness) for that vehicle. They are pretty inexpensive and a lot more dependable.

first disconnect the positive& negative battery cables.then wait for two minutes.then insert removal tool into the four holes in the control panel. if you don't have one use a metal coat hanger and bend it so it has a u-shape.then insert them in all four holes about 1-1/2 inches until you feel the clips release.then push the tools outward and pull the assembly out of the instrument panel.disconnect the wiring harness & vacuum hoses. if you want to replace it with a CD player you will have to get the kit.go to www.scosche.com and they will have what you need.good luck!

Don't want to spend the money? You can insert 4 small slender rods in the 4 holes on the left and right side of the radio (small Allen wrenches or very long nails, or similar). insert until you feel some tension, then apply slight pressure towards the outside of the radio while pulling the radio out. There are clips that you need to press in towards the radio to release it. Sometimes, you can do one side at a time.

-donville

ClarifiedThe answer that donville provided is excellent, however it doesn't take you through it step by step.

You can use two long screwdrivers and put them into the side closest to the cassette dock. Then you can push away from the stereo while grabbing the front. This will kick out the one side of the device. Do the same on the other two holes, but have a firm grip on the front of the stereo. Otherwise the side that you have popped out will pop back in. From here you can pull the stereo out and tilt it up so the hook above the stereo will clear the top of the main housing.

By using this http://www.crutchfield.com/p_120865618/Universal-DIN-Tool-Pair.HTML?tp=990

OK, I have a Mercury Sable 93 and 94 - if you have the stock radio that is a similar in size to a retail headunit, then you have to buy the Ford radio removal tools. I'm not sure of the specific name, but they're in the shape of a U, and only cost about $3 to $4. Put them in both sides until you feel an indent - push the tools outward while pulling the radio towards you.

You can usually take the factory stereo mounting brackets off and put them on the new radio and it should pop in and lock and release the same way you took the factory radio out.

DO NOT USE WIRE HANGERS!! For only about $3 you can buy the Ford radio removal tools made for this.

Also, you do not have to remove any dashboard trim - the radio will slide straight out of the opening with the tools. I have found that the clips can be taken off the old radio and screwed onto the new unit.

I also agree to buy the wiring harness! It is $15 well invested and they are readily available from most autoparts stores. Crutchfield.com will usually even throw them in if you buy a radio from them. (if not free, very inexpensive.)

Cut up a wire clothes hanger so that you make a tool shaped like the letter C. Ensure that the "C" is fairly long by cutting one end of the hanger close to the middle. Now you have your tool, look for two holes on either side of the stock radio and insert your "tool," into the holes about 1 to 1 1/2 inch, this should give you enough friction to pull it out. It will take a couple tries but you'll know you're doing it right when the radio partially comes out. Eventually it will pop out.

You only need the standard Ford radio, U shaped removal tools, readily & cheaply ($3-5) available at an auto parts store, Walmart, Kmart, etc.

(Don't try to save a few dollars and spend far more than $5 worth of your time with home made tools)

Use the removal tools to pull the radio assembly out of the dash - note: you do NOT need to remove the plastic trim piece! :)

  • Insert the tools into each pair of small holes on either side of the radio face
  • They're all the way in when you feel them hit an indent, or a bit of 'click'
  • Push the tops of the tools to the *OUTSIDE* while pulling the radio out from the dash. This is more "art" & feel than specific instructions.

- Disconnect the 2 wire harness connectors and the radio antenna wire.

Re-installing is just a matter of connecting the wire harnesses & antenna - align and push the radio back in until you hear/feel the side retainer-clips click back into place.

TIPS:

  • Be sure to spend the few dollars for a wire harness kit - This saves you from having to CUT the factory wiring. If you sell the car, it takes only 10 minutes to put the factory radio back.
  • Many places even give you the tools when you buy a radio from them, like Crutchfield.com

The same way you would change any Ford/Mercury factory car stereo. You use either the U-shaped Ford removal tools you can buy at any auto parts store (kept usually near the stereos, cost $5 at Advance/Discount Auto). Insert these in the two holes on either side of the factory stereo until you feel them slide in a little easier. This has released the retaining clips inside the stereo housing. Pull your hands apart as if stretching a piece of bubble gum or something, and pull out. The old factory stereo should slide out pretty easily.

Unhook the connectors in the back, the thicker black cable with the metal spear-like tip is your antenna wire.

You also need a wiring harness which you can buy for anywhere from $10-20 at any auto parts store or electronics store that sells car stereos. Most will have a simple wiring diagram printed on the package, you just splice the wires together, nearly all are color-coded and the new harness will use the same colors. Usually are 8 wires for the speakers, one colored and one striped for each of the four speakers (solid colored is positive, striped is negative) that will actually be on one harness (grey, I think) and the other harness (they do come as a set) should be black and for the power other connections. One blue wire is for the antenna control, which you can ignore if you have a separate switch on the dash to control it. Red wire is positive power, black is negative/ground. I think there is a yellow wire but hell if I can remember what its for, but like I said, there should be a basic wiring diagram on the package for the wiring harness.

Once you have the wiring harness connected to the new stereo (make sure you used crimp connectors or electrical tape, do NOT use duct tape or any other sort of tape), you just hook the new harness to the existing one in the car, and plug the black antenna cable into the obvious round hole in the back of the new stereo (some will also have a black line coming out of the stereo rear with a female connector to plug the antenna cable into). Once you have these connected, slide the stereo into the dashboard and make sure it fits tightly. You may need a mounting bracket kit, but in my experience, its usually not necessary.

Its fairly simple, the hardest part is cramming the wires back into the dashboard so the stereo will fit in tightly. The wiring harness connecting takes anywhere from 10 minutes to an hour, depending on your experience and confidence. My recommendation is to take the new stereo and the wiring harness inside and splice them together while you're watching some football or non-existant hockey.

Cut two pieces of coat hangar 5" long. Bend into "U" shape around a broom handle. On each side of the face of the radio are two holes. Insert your new tool approx. 1 " into the holes. Apply pressure outwards to release the clips holding the radio in the dash and pull the radio towards you.

... or you can just go to any sound shop or Wal-Mart and buy the tool for a couple of bucks... they'd have it by the head units and speakers.

Ford radio removal tools are available for just a few dollars from any auto parts store. Insert one into each set of 2 access holes on each side of the face of the radio unit. When inserting the tool, you will feel a spot where the notched ends have caught into a slight indentation. Push the tops of the tools outward (left and right) while simultaneously pulling the radio forward, away from the dash.

When you have the radio out, you'll see that the tools are actually releasing the clips on the side of the radio.

you will need to unscrew your dash and pull off the front plate of your dash, then you will need to unscrew the stock radio, then you will need to go ahead and pull out the adapter from the back of your radio. -Shocker

There are 2 small round holes on each side of the radio body faceplate. There are tools sold in sets of 2 that are inserted into the holes to release the catches. When inserted and the catches are released, the tools are used like handles to pull the stereo head out.

take 4 home trim nails in and push them twards the doors(left 2 to the left and right 2 to the right) pull out of dash

You can also go to O'Reilly auto parts and pick up a Ford Radio Removal Tool for 5 bucks,to go perfectly in and pop, then remove

460461462
Ford Taurus
Mercury Sable
Turn Signals and Hazard Lights

Why would your turn signals and flashers fail on a Taurus or Sable?

The three most likely causes seem to be the following:

  • Fuses
  • Flasher unit
  • Turn signal switch on the steering column

Here are some suggestions from our community on how to resolve the problem:

  • I had a similar problem. The fix is actually pretty easy. The car is almost 20 years old, has 200,000 miles on it. The connector for the lighting portion of the multi-function switch, is on the top of the TILT steering column. Every time you tilt the wheel down, you pull on this connector. The connector has two locking clips that hold it in place. After time, the connector becomes brittle, and the locking clips break off. That seems to be what happened to my friend's car, that she just purchased. The paint is pretty badly oxidized, which tells me the car was left in the sun a lot, which will speed up the aging of the plastic. One thing that might tip you off, is if you raise the wheel, the lights might start to work again. This is how I fixed it: Remove the battery cable, or you may drain the battery! Under the steering column, there are three Phillips head screws. Remove these, lower the steering column, and remove the tilt lever, Chilton's says you may need a small wrench to remove that lever. Remove the lower portion of the steering column cowl. Insert the ignition key, and turn to the running position. Since you have disconnected the battery cable, the car should not turn over. When you look at the bottom of the steering column, under the lock cylinder, you will see a round spot with a smaller circle in the middle. Use a small screwdriver or awl to depress the center spot. You should now be able to pull the lock cylinder out, and remove the top of the steering column cowl. On the very top of the steering column, you will see the connector to the multi-function switch. If the locking clips are broken, as they probably will be, as your car is now 20 years old, you have a problem. Pretty easy to fix. If you look carefully at the connector, you will notice there are two groups of wires, one on each side, with no wires in the middle of the connector. Pull the connector up, and get yourself some slack! Make certain that the steering column is at its lowest position, and that when you plug the connector in, it is not being pulled on. Then using a small drill, maybe 1/8 inch, carefully drill right next to the little nub that USED to hold the locking clip. Then put a 1" screw into the hole. That should hold it! Now reassemble the steering column. Watch for the "key in ignition sensor contact. The clip that holds that in place is very small. Mine was also broken. I put a little bit of silicone adhesive on it, pressed it back into place, and wrapped two wraps of electrician's tape around it, making sure that the tape was stuck onto itself. I know, this all sounds so tacky! But the car is 20 years old. You are going to need to get creative to keep it running!
  • Many vehicles have the hazard switch as a push-on push-off in the top center of the steering column. This is a good place to spray your WD-40 or similar cleaner as the contacts for this switch are often the problem, and being on the top side gravity will help the cleaner flow into the contact areas. Be careful if you use another product to be certain it doesn't contain alcohol or other solvent that can attack plastic. Such solvents introduced into any plastic switch component can destroy it rather than improve the functioning.
  • This works! I lost my turn signals and flashers this past weekend and stumbled on this WD40 solution. I have a 96 Taurus. I removed the steering column covers and sprayed in the switch and the hazard button area. I waited several minutes and tried but no luck. I reapplied until the WD40 was dripping quickly from the bottom of the switch. A real soaking. Then I agitated the turn switch for left and right and pushed the hazard button quickly up and down. Suddenly everything clicked in and worked. My guess is dirt and build up on the contacts is removed with the WD40. I also notice that my windshield wiper fluid now works with a slight touch. Previously I had to really push and push at it several times until a shot of wiper fluid would come out. This is a great solution! A new switch is about $120 and a flasher relay about $60. Thanks!
  • It may be your flasher, usually a round metal thing under the dash. check the bulbs If all four directional lights do not work, first check fuse, if fuse is good, your flasher is bad. If both your left and right turn signals (dash indicators & front/read lamps) do not come on, check Fuse, Flasher unit is good and plugged in and most importantly, the Hazard Flasher Switch (on some cars) may be unplugged or bad. If your turn signals and flashers don't work it could be your turn signal switch. The flasher lights and the blinkers both went out on my 97 Taurus. After checking the fuses (separate) and bulbs I looked online. I had found others saying that if your door ajar light and your inside light stays on to spray wd40 in the locks and the latch mechanism. Well I had this problem also so I tried it, and after years of not having an inside light this worked. I had previously removed the interior lamp relay because it wouldn't go out. I went back to address my original concern (blinkers and flashers) and I found that the most likely problem would be with the multi-function switch. While trying to get to the multi function switch in the steering column, I couldn't get the tilt steering lever off. I was getting very aggravated so I just sprayed the crap out of it wd40 (I had it there anyway) All I can say is that when they first started working they were intermittent and then fast flashing. I sprayed more wd40 and now the blinkers and the flashers work. Go figure.
  • My symptoms were very similar: the windshield washer fluid was hard to activate at first, then would not spray at all so I had the pump and electrical looked at but only a temporary fix, also the right turn signal was intermittent or double speed for a while and for 24 hours didn't work at all and then came back, and just today in very cold weather both turn signals and the hazards failed to turn on at all. Until I read this answer I hadn't put it all together, but when I sprayed the WD40 until dripping in the hazard button on top of the steering column and also into the base of the multifunction switch and into the joint between the windshield washer button at the end of the switch, working everything around vigorously and then letting it sit for 30 minutes, suddenly everything started working again. Turn signals, flashers, windshield fluid. Thanks everyone for this cheap and easy fix!
  • I have a 2004 Chevrolet Classic. The turn signals would not work - no lights on dash or even the clicking sound (from the flasher). All bulbs checked out O.K. The hazard lights worked fine. I replaced the multi-switch. Still did not work. I was ready to take to to the dealer to have them trace the wiring. As a last resort, I tried the WD-40 solution on the flasher switch - IT WORKED!!!! I was amazed. Fix Both Flashers with WD40 Squirt! WD40! No kidding!
  • Chances are the "multifunction switch" under the steering wheel has stuck open. Squirt WD40 generously under the Hazard warning light switch behind the steering wheel. Operate the switch on and off about a dozen times, then operate the turn-signal switch left and right about a dozen times. Add some more WD40 and let it sit a few minutes. Try again. It should begin to work. If not, replace the flasher for $10 at your local auto parts store ($40-50 at the Ford parts department). It's a blue plastic cube close under the dash to the left of the steering wheel. Just remove it from its bracket and push the new one in place. Voila, Viola!
  • You have probably figured it out by now, but it could be your multi-function switch located at the base of the turn signal, wiper, etc, stalk (lever). Also controls hazard lights. Not that hard to replace if necessary. Check out old switch with an olms meter. A Haynes guide book can help you. A new switch should cost less than $100. Just had the exact same problem on my 96 Crown Vic, plus I could flash the high beams, but not leave them on. Took off the turn signal stalk, opened it up at the base and all the copper contacts were corroded (by lube Ford uses at factory?) Cleaned them, and everything now works fine! Cost- zero!
  • For all these posts, whenever they mention WD40 being applied for electronics, while it may be ok to use WD40, you are probably safer using a lubricant made especially for electronic components. There are some plastics that WD40 is not good for and it can be overkill for places with electronic components and plastics in the same place. That said, I use a spray can lubricant I found in home depot called CRC Electrical Grade 2-26. I found it in the electrical department (house wiring etc). Just look for the one that says its safe for plastics and is made especially for electrical connections. I think it does the same thing as WD40 but without some of the corrosive effect on certain plastics. It also doesn't smell. I promise I do not own any stock in this company nor do I have a problem with WD40, I use it all the time for other applications.
  • Check that all parking and brake lights are working. Bad bulbs won't flash. Other possibles - blown fuse. flasher relay bad. switch kit inside steering column broke.
  • Your relay could be bad they are located underneath your dash on the driver side.
  • There is a device called a 'flasher' which is what actually makes the lights blink. It is usually in a very difficult place to locate, sometimes under the dashboard, sometimes in the engine compartment. If you own a car, it is worthwhile to purchase a maintenance manual for it. These can be found at most part stores, and run about 20 dollars. In it, you should find the exact location of the turn signal flasher unit.
  • Have it checked out. It could be the t/s switch Hazard (emergency) relay might need replacing. Our 97 sable has a problem with the emergency flasher switch on top of the steering column that also keeps the turn signals from flashing. Just pushing the button on and off many times has fixed it(temporarily and cheaply) twice over the last 5 years or so.
  • This happened to my '98 Mercury Sable. I had to replace the "Turn Signal Wiper Lever Switch." The part was about $75 and you can find it at some local auto parts stores (I got mine at a local NAPA). It took a bit of work to replace it, but it's not too hard.
  • I have the same problem in my 95 Ford Taurus. Checked the fuses and they were all okay. Next step was to find the flasher but after checking this problem out online, this is what I found. Most likely the problem is the multi-function switch. In the 95, it is located in the steering column. From others that have had this problem, I found you might get the switch working again by dismantling the switch and cleaning the contacts. You can also find one in a junkyard to replace the broken one but you'll have to remove it yourself to save any money.
  • Most likely it is your turn signal flasher,and it should be located close by the fuse panel. It will be round and looks like a short battery and it may be plastic or metal.
  • Check the flasher for your emergency flasher.There are two flasher units, one for turn and one for emergencies.
  • Most likely a bad turn signal flasher Could also be a bad switch in the steering column.
  • I would think the first thing to check would be the fuses. Your owners' manual should provide a fuse diagram, there is likely to be one on the fuse box cover.
  • Check for bad flasher (usually under dash) and also check for bad fuse in fuse block.
  • I took a suggestion from one of our farmers, I sprayed WD 40 on top and around the flasher which is located on top of the steering wheel column. I checked the flasher the next day and it worked beautifully.
  • Usually I just replace the multi-function switch, assuming it isn't a bad bulb. A bad bulb would be too obvious, though.
458459460
Ford Taurus
Starters and Ignition Systems
Mercury Sable

How do you replace the ignition switch cylinder in a Ford Taurus - Mercury Sable?

I am not completely sure how to do this myself, but I can get you started as I am researching this question myself. Haynes manual doesn't say how to replace the electronic switch. You may or may not be able to figure this out better than me and the rest of the way if I get you started.

Getting the lock cylinder out

The first part is really quite easy I found out. I know you have to disconnect the battery first so the car will not turn on, and so the air bags will not be triggered, and to protect the electrical system.

Then turn the ignition key to the run position and at the same time press the lock pin in that is on the bottom of the lock on the bottom of the column right under the position of the key lock.

Now while doing all of this pull the lock cylinder out. You may have to move the lock back and forth to get the pin to depress. Use a small 1/8 inch punch or screwdriver to press it in. You will notice that the back of the lock mechanism goes through the switch and they turn together when attached.

Now take the the top and bottom covers off of the steering column. I have a feeling the switch is under the top cover and easy to get to with a couple of screws holding it in.

From other experiences with different types of cars you may have to take the steering wheel off to get inside the column. To do that take the screws out from behind the steering wheel which hold the airbag mechanism in place on the front of the steering wheel. Be gentle and careful not to discharge the airbag. Next there is a bolt in the center of the steering wheel to remove. Depending on which method I just mentioned, those are the two ways u may need to use.

The ignition (electrical) switch is located on the steering column and most times on the bottom. Remove the panel from the drivers side to expose the steering column. There should be two torx screws holding it in place. Remove the screws and pull down, remove the wiring harness and take to your local parts distributor. Don't forget to disconnect the battery prior to starting and electrical project.

For a 96 - 99 Sable disconnect the battery cables wait two minutes, then turn ignition key lock cylinder to the run position, insert a 1/8 inch pin punch or cylinder tool into the hole at the bottom of the steering column cover surrounding the lock cylinder. Depress the punch while pulling out on the lock cylinder which will remove it from the column housing.

Replacing a Not-Working Lock Cylinder
  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2. Remove the upper and lower steering column covers.
  3. Insert a 0.125 drill bit in the hole at the top of the cylinder housing and drill out the retaining pin.

    NOTE Be careful! Don't drill anything but the pin hole straight in

  4. Remove the lock cylinder
  5. Clean out all the metal shavings
To Install:
  1. Turn the new lock cylinder to accessory position
  2. Press and hold the retainer pin in, insert the lock cylinder into the housing.

    Test it out and put everything back together - don't forget the battery cable too.

  3. Turn the key to the OFF position the release the retaining pin and lock it in

Remove lower bevel cover and turn ignition to run position,depress pin in bottom of switch and pull

If it will turn with the key in it you turn it and turn your steering wheel, look either under or straight ahead for a little button type thing that you must push in and pull out the cylinder, either that or you must drill your cylinder so you can turn it, or use a puller and pull out the inside of the cylinder, then find the button to pull out the housing.

455456457
Cars & Vehicles
Ford Taurus
Ford Ranger

What are causes for no-heat problems in a Ford Taurus - blowing cold or lukewarm air only?

These are common causes of 'no-heat' when the coolant is flowing:

  1. Blocked / plugged heater core

    To check - confirm that both heater hoses going into the firewall are warm. If only one is warm, likely there is a blockage and the core will have to be flushed and/or replaced.

  2. Temperature blend door is stuck in the cold air position
    • The door itself is binding and not able to pivot.
    • The blend door actuator has failed - see "Related Links" below for the Autozone.com online repair guide to replacing the blend door actuator / motor. It's only about $15.
  3. Water pump - (see way down below) The water pump kind of self destructs on the inside without leaking out the weep hole. The fins just fall apart and you lose heat for your heater and the engine will overheat too.

If your Taurus is only blowing cold air:

Check the level of your anti-freeze, and make sure that its level is normal.....

1. Open the front hood....

2. Look at the anti-freeze storage tank (white plastic tank on the left side of the engine compartment as you face the front of the car). Check to see where the level is and make sure that it is in the recommended temp zone of Hot or Cold.

3. If the anti-freeze level is in the recommended zone, then the thermostat might be shut closed and not letting the fluid flow freely to the engine. If this is the case, the thermostat has to be replaced. But if the thermostat is stuck, the engine will be overheating anyway, and you'd see the temperature gauge on the dashboard getting up to a dangerous level.

More input from WikiAnswers contributors:

  • I just bought a 99 Sable and was told by the seller that the heater core needed to be replaced. The cost being $500. My beloved mechanic that I have brought my 97 Status to for the last few years said that the core didn't need to be replaced, the core was so clogged that they had to flush it twice, which saved me $350. Unless you absolutely trust your mechanic like I do... $350 difference.. We were both expecting a replacement... ask for the heater core to be flushed before jumping to a replacement. Always check for clogs.
  • Check how high the temp gauge goes. if it doesn't go above 1/3 of the gauge, change the thermostat or check the tap unit on the firewall.
  • If the engine comes up to proper temperature: - The heater core might be plugged. Pull the 2 hoses off the heater core on the firewall, then take a garden hose and flush all the muck out of the heater core, and you might then have heat. - The blend air door might not be opening all the way. Check under the hood near the blower motor--there is a vacuum line there, check to see if it's getting vacuum.
  • If you flush the heater core and rust comes out, this is usually the water pump's impellers/fins/blades having rusted and broken up, so you should replace the water pump too or the heater core may become clogged again. For some reason, many water pumps are made of a metal that rusts (it's about the only metal that rusts in the entire cooling system), though you may be able to find replacement water pumps that don't have rustable impellers.
  • It could be a bad temp blend door actuator, or I have see a lot of those getting rust in the cooling system and clogging up the heater core.
  • I'm assuming it did this before you changed the thermostat too. If not, maybe you installed the thermostat upside down. If all is well I'd suspect your heater control valve. As I recall it's vacuum operated so check the vacuum line for cracks/breaks. etc.
  • You might wanna think about replacing your heater core. I've had this in the past and it meant the heater core died. After replacing it, it worked just fine. It can die without blowing anti-freeze foul smelling smoke everywhere. That just means it cracked. i get warm air, but LOTS of smoke lol. It could also be that your water is not circulating right. Have you checked your water level? If you do not have a full radiator, it will NOT blow hot air. I've had many problems with cars in my life. Any more questions on Taurus/Sable, feel free to ask me.
  • First, flushing heater cores rarely works. The passages are too small. We just replace them. Further, even if you do flush out the core, if you don't flush out the rest of the system, the core gets stopped back up the first time you start the engine up again. Another possibility is that, if the system is or was rusty, the impellers could be rusted off the back of the water pump, and you have insufficient coolant circulation. We see a lot of that here. Another thing that could be your problem, is that you have a temp blend door stuck or the motor that runs the temp blend door is faulty. The dash has to be removed to access either of those two things.
  • Are you saying the blower motor does not work? If so, then the blower motor, fan switch, temperature blend door, or the resistor pack is bad, or a fuse is blown.
  • If you have checked the temperature of the heater hoses and it appears that heat is being delivered to the core, the problem is most likely with the air flow through the core, not the core itself. The air flow is controlled by the temperature blend door, and this door has a history of failure on the Taurus and Sable. Replacing the door is a fairly involved process and expensive at the dealer. There is a DIY system from HeaterTreater that will help you with the diagnostics and fix. Check HeaterTreater.net for pictures and information. We have a video posted in the Tech section that will show you how to disassemble the center dash console and check for blend door problems. It is a common failure on the Taurus/Sable for this door to break and fall to the bottom of the box, blocking heat. The HeaterTreater is an innovative method to extract the old door and replace it with a metal door that will not break again. The advantage is that it is not necessary to remove the dash and plenum box to do the fix. Full details are on the site.

The video posted on the HeaterTreater web site in the TECH section will show you how to access and diagnose blend door problems without removing the dash panel. You do have to remove the center instrument console to get a good view of the plenum box. The hardest part is pulling the radio. It requires a special tool to release the catches on both sides of the radio. You can purchase the tool at any auto parts store or make your own out of a piece of heavy wire bent into a U shape. Or...find your local car thief, they can pull one in seconds!!!

The other thing you want to be sure of is that there is no air trapped in the coolant system. On a cold engine remove the radiator cap and check that the radiator is full, not the overflow tank, the radiator. If air is trapped in the system, it will affect engine cooling efficiency and the HVAC system.

  • You may have a stuck temp blend door in the heater case or the motor that runs it may be faulty. To access either of those items, the dash needs to be removed. The heater core could be clogged, that's what happened on our '98 Taurus SE. Also check the coolant levels and see if it needs to be flushed or topped off.
  • Various cars have various ways of making hot and cold air. Most everyone uses a set of air vanes to switch between hot and cold. Some cars keep the A/C on in the defrost setting. Bottom line here is that it sounds like your A/C clutch is not turning off and the cold air is outdoing the warm air.
  • On mine, the heat stopped working and I replaced the thermostat and the heater core was replaced, and it turned out that it was the water pump. Try replacing that. It worked on mine. I even went as far as replacing the radio console.
  • The first place I would look is the heater core. My own experience tells me that yours might be clogged. If you have hot water going in and coming out of it but no warm air flow, then I would start there. Until you confirm whether or not the core is clogged then you are wasting time and effort trying to solve this one.
  • The good news is that it might open up with an acid flush. I tried that with my Taurus and had some success with it. I did eventually have the core replaced. They are aluminum and hate it when you have an open cooling system (mine was open due to a cracked reservoir that I didn't know about). Corrosion and mineral deposits get in there and kill the coolant flow. This is why using distilled water for your antifreeze/water mix is preferred over tap water. I hope this puts you on the right path to solve this one.
  • What both of your problems probably are is a clogged heater core, it happened to me and upon investigating I found out it was ridiculously common for that make and year range of Taurus to get its heater core clogged up with rust. Ford even put in a bypass on the heater system so that the whole cooling system wouldn't get clogged. What you want to do is let the car run, then locate the two hoses that go into the top middle of the firewall, just below the windshield--most likely one will be hot, which would be the input to the heater core, and the other cold, the heater core's output. If both are cold, it may be because the core is clogged.
  • I have a 97 Taurus GL Wagon that has the same symptoms. I have been searching for the solution for a few days now and hope we can figure this out soon or my wife will not be too happy. Is it possible that the vacuum lines that control the heater are not working? When I replaced my stereo 3 years ago I remember that all the controls were vacuum lines. However I am not sure where they get the vacuum from. When I change the settings it seems to make the same noise as always. it sometimes will start heating then quit after a while or when you turn off the car then turn it back on. Is this also something new to Ford's Taurus or maybe I find it strange that so many people have the same problem but I have not seen the answer online anwhere yet. I have solved a few problems online and hope this one is the same. Good luck and I will keep hunting for an answer. I will check back to see if we can figure this out.
  • No heat can also be caused by blown engine head gaskets. This messes with coolant flow through the system, preventing enough coolant from flowing through the heater core. But if one or both of your head gaskets are blown, your car will have other symptoms, such as smoke coming from the tailpipe (oil mixing with the water), overheating, etc.
  • There's a door under the dash that directs air over the heater core. If it is broken then you will not get heat but you will still have A/C. To fix it you will have to take the dash apart.
  • Check heater blower fuse and blower motor; coolant level; heater hose from radiator to heater core, and from heater core to water pump, for water shutoff both hoses should get warm with engine running and temp selector on hot.
  • I have a 2001 Ford Taurus and have the same problem. When I consulted a Ford dealership they ask me if the coolant was brown and yes indeed the water looked more like mud water than the usual green anti-freeze. They told me that it is very common for the Taurus heater core to get blocked and that was more than likely what was going on. I flushed the system with no results because the heater core involves removing the dash to access, and the dealer book shows that job in the 6 hour range. I'm going to try all other options before I replace the heater core but that might be the only solution, besides winter is coming soon.
  • Taurus heater cores are well-known for clogging - especially if something along the lines of "stop-leak" was ever poured in the radiator, or the radiator has not been serviced regularly.
  • One solution is to flush the heater core - this can be done by disconnecting the heater core hoses at the firewall and simply flushing it with a garden hose and nozzle. However, you should also do a more complete flush, which would include the engine too, since there may be rust in its coolant passages too, which may re-clog the heater core if you don't clean it out. Otherwise take it to a shop and have this done.
  • Your heater core is probably clogged. To fix this remove both hoses that go to the heater core, they would look similar to radiator hoses, but smaller diameter. Then run water through both ways until the water runs through clean. That may fix your problem.
  • If there is no air at all blowing, then check the fuse for the heating. If the fuse is good, replace the blower motor. If there is air, just no heat, replace the heater core. You will find the core on the passenger side of the dash panel.
  • Either there is a vacuum leak going to the Heater Control Valve, or the heater core is blocked, or heater hoses blocked, or NO thermostat or it's stuck open. OR the mixer/blend door actuator is bad or disconnected.
  • The cooling system is pretty straightforward in how it works, so it is possible that the 'wire' that links the 'temperature-control' on the dash board to the 'interior heater unit' broke or became disconnected (at one end or the other) while last being in the 'Cold' position. Does the 'temperature control' knob or handle for the temperature seem easier to move than previously? That may be an indication of that situation just described. This isn't usually a quick fix item as, unless you can locate both ends of the controlling wire, you'll have to get into the dashboard or floor board to fix it. The floor board may be your starting spot as it may be more accessible. Second thought is that your internal heater has become plugged up significantly. That could have to be due to adding over-the-counter 'STOP-LEAK' type chemicals to the cooling system, but this is a somewhat 'remote' probability. However, if you haven't done a coolant flush since the car was built in 1999, there could be rust and other build up within the coolant system to certainly at least restrict the flow of coolant to the heater. However, if you haven't noticed a gradual loss of heating over the years, my bet is on the control linkage I spoke of. Good Luck.
  • The thermostat may be stuck and need replacing. Also, this is pretty rare, but if the car is older, and the coolant has not been changed per specs, sometimes the vanes in the water pump may corrode and fall off. That causes a reduced coolant flow and can get expensive real quick Replacing the water pump is something the do-it-yourselfer can usually do, unless you want to keep a dealer service dept happy. But replacing the water pump is probably the last thing to try, though even if it appears unnecessary, it may be worth it in the long run if the water pump has 100,000 or more miles on it, since it will need to be replaced soon anyway.
  • We own a 1997 Taurus GL Sedan and have had our own issues with the heater. Based on that, here is what you are most likely looking at: a clogged heater core. The good news is that you might get lucky and have it cured by doing an acid flush of the cooling system. The bad news is you may have to have the heater core replaced. That is an expensive fix as most of the cost is in labor to having to disassemble the dash and firewall to get to the core itself.
  • If you know any mechanics, you are in luck. Hopefully one whose life you saved and he owes you big time. I don't know if I would call this a do-it-yourself job, it may depend on your skill level under the hood. I bit the bullet and had my local dealer do the core swap for me. Final damage: $2160.86
  • I am also trying to solve no heat issue in 99 Sable. New water pump, thermostat, heater core, replaced corroded steel lines leading to core. No heat still. Just wanted to let you all know, the heater core job can be done in 2 hours or less if you check out on google video, search heater core shortcut. The vehicle shown is a Taurus, but twin of the Sable. I actually did as he shows in video and it sure was easier than the water pump job. I did find that to pull the core it helps to push the inlet pipes from inside the engine compartment to pop the seal on the rubber grommets holding them in place, then allowing you to actually pull on the no longer recessed core from the inside of the car.

Other Ideas & a water pump culprit:

It could be a lot really. Heater core stopped up?

Have you checked the thermostat?

If your Taurus - Sable has 150,000 or more miles on it, you may need a water pump. They wear out. They have fins on them and I have a 2000 Taurus and was what was wrong with mine. The water pump kind of self-destructs on the inside without leaking out the weep hole. The fins just fall apart and you lose heat for your heater and the engine will overheat too.

Please refer to the related questions for more information.

451452453
Serpentine Belts
Ford Taurus

Where can you find an online diagram for serpentine belt routing for any vehicle?

Free online diagrams can be found at Dayco.com. They offer a free online comprehensive serpentine belt reference tool - including routing diagrams and tensioner information.

Visit scribd.com/doc/28287331/Dayco-Serpentine-Belt-Guide.

Somewhere under the hood, usually on the fan shroud or near the radiator, there should be a sticker with a diagram of the belt routing, 2001 may even be on the hood. On this diagram it will show a tensioner pulley and idler pulley and the approximate location. Most Fords use a 15mm or 16mm bolt on the tensioner. This is where you put a wrench to rotate the tensioner and remove the belt. When you turn the tensioner bolt, turn towards the front of the car. There will be a lot of tension so pull hard.

Installation Notes:

Put a wrench on the (spring loaded) tensioner/idler pulley and take out the tension. You can then remove the belt. Replace the belt by fitting it around the pulleys and lastly loosening the tension with the tensioner/idler pulley to allow the belt to fit over the last pulley.

448449450
Ford Taurus
Mercury Sable
Heater Cores and Blower Fans

Why does your Ford Taurus - Mercury Sable heater blower not work?

Recall and Technical Service Bulletin
The body style that ran from about '99-'03 had a issue with rain water getting into the blower case and ruining the blower resister assembly and the blower motor. There is a modified cowl cover that is supposed correct this condition. One tell tale sign that you have this problem is pull the blower resister assembly out and examine it. If it has corrosion or rust on the terminals, you have this problem. Replace the resister assembly, blower motor, and cowl cover.


There is a detailed posting on this problem in the "Related Links" below
If the blower is completely dead and is not providing any air movement, the cause could be in the resistor block for the fan motor, the fuse, or the fan motor.

Check the fuse first. Refer to the owners manual for the fuse. (see "Related Questions" below)

If you have one or more blower speeds, the problem is the resistor block.

The Ford Taurus blower has a resistor block that controls the various speeds of the blower motor. It is located on the passenger compartment side of the blower housing and can be replaced in five minutes. Unfortunately, I could only find the part at the Ford dealership who ripped me off for $20. You can find the part online for around $10.

If you do not have any speeds, you should verify the fan motor works by pulling it and connecting it to a 12 volt DC power source.

To pull the fan motor, you will have to remove the glove box to gain access to the 3 or 4 screws that hold the fan in place, although I did it without removing the glove box. The motor is attached to a large mounting plate that is at the bottom of the air plenum located behind the glove box. If you look up from the passenger floor you will see the motor hanging down. It is about the size of a soup can and is attached to a larger mounting plate. Once the connector is disconnected and the screws are out, you will have to turn the mounting plate to allow the motor to drop. Pay attention to the position as you pull it down as it needs to go back in the same twisting fashion.

I used a spare auto battery to test the motor, but you could use the one in the car, but just be careful to not short things out. Also, really brace the motor prior to connecting to battery as it has a lot of torque and could twist out of your hand.

If the motor is good and really spins up, then the problem is the resistor block is completely dead. (Replace it the resistor block.)

If the fan does not spin, you can get a replacement from any junk yard as they are the same part from the late 90's to the end of the Taurus. The parts guy at the yard can determine compatibility. Make sure he tests the fan before you buy it. Should cost about $10 - $15.
I repaired my fan by working it out of the housing, and freeing it up with WD-40. i then greased it up and it is fine, but I would recommend just getting a junk yard replacement. (much more time efficient!)

NOTE: a brand new motor is only $45 or so. With warranty.

AnswerBlown fuse, bad switch, defective resistor pack, or a bad fan motor.


See "Related Questions" below for more
Answer

If the blower motor is the problem, it should make noise or fail to work until you hit it with a hammer.

If the blower resistor is the problem, the blower should work only when set to the highest speed.
First things first. On your instrument panel, if you turn on the fan and nothing happens, you can be pretty sure it's your blower motor. The a/c and heat share the same blower, so if both won't blow that's probably your problem. I would doubt it's the switch. Those things just don't go too often, and it's more work than it's worth to take off the dash to get to it. I would bet it's the blower, as those go frequently in this model- bless the people at ford. I have the same car and had to do this last year. Go purchase a repair manual at your local auto store ($15). It's well worth it. This repair is pretty easy and you CAN do it yourself in an hour our so by following the directions in the manual- I promise, even if you don't know a socket from a screwdriver. Your blower motor, if that's what the problem truly is, is located behind your glove compartment. You can see it if you push in the tabs on each side of your glove and lower it down; don't worry you won't break them. A blower motor is $40 or so. It's easy access, very simple to do and will get you back on track. Just be sure to disconnect your neg battery terminal before you do any work. However, if the problem is your heater core you may want to get someone to help fix that if you're not mechanically inclined. If it is the core you can always just turn your blower on vent and get the hot air from the engine in the winter. Best of luck.
replace the fan motor relay.
Amen to the first answer. Same thing happened to me a few weeks ago on my Taurus. Had to replace blower motor. Labor, parts cost $142.00. Mechanic warned me to keep all switches in the off position when I bring it to car wash. Water gets sucked into the blower motor housing, apparently even it car is off. Go figure. im my experience i have found that water leaks into the blower motor from the area of the cabin air filter and the water shorts the motor out. you may check with your local Ford dealer because there might be a recall on this issue. good luck I HAVE A 2001 FORD TAURUS SES AND THE BLOWER STOPPED WORKING ON IT. I PUT 2 NEW BLOWERS IN IT. THE FORD DEALER COULD NOT FIND THE PROBLEM. SO I TOOK IT TO A BODY SHOP AND HE FOUND A LEAK IN THE CABIN AIR FILTER HE FIXED IT HAVE NOT HAD ANY MORE PROBLEMS. if their is water in the blower motor ford has a tsb (technical service bulliten) to replace the blower motor, blower motor switch, the passanger side cowl panel and a new weatherstrip. check with you local dealer.
Blown blower motor fuse? Bad blower motor? Bad blower motor resistor? Blower Relay?

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Ford Taurus
Mercury Sable
Turn Signals and Hazard Lights

Where is the hazard turn signal flasher unit located and how do you change it on a 1986-1995 Taurus Sable?

Flasher Location

  • It's located on top off the fuse panel under the dash on the driver side.
  • Turn signal/ flasher relay is behind left end of instrument panel above the fuse box
Might not be your flasher I was asking this same question about my 95 Ford Taurus. If your problem is your signal and hazard lights not working and you've checked your fuses, the next logical step would be to find the flasher. On looking up this question myself I found that the problem usually wasn't the flasher but the multifunction switch located on the steering column. The best answer I found so far was to spray some WD40 under the hazard warning light switch behind the steering wheel. Operate the switch on and off about a dozen times, then operate the turn-signal switch left and right about a dozen times. Add some more WD40 and let it sit a few minutes. Try again. It should begin to work. One location of the flasher was under the dash to the left of the steering wheel. It was described as a blue plastic cube. Don't know if yours looks like that or not. Hope this helped at least a little.

Answer If it is like my 98 Grand Marquis, it is incorporated within the hazard flasher switch on top of the steering column. Before spending money to get it repaired, try squirting some WD 40 around the switch and push it down and let it pop up several times and wiggle it around. It worked for me when my flashers, turn signals, and brake lights stop working. Apparently, over the years gunk finds it way in there, be it dirt, liquids, etc. Pressing the flasher switch can sometimes initiate the problem. I don't believe there is a plug-in "flasher" you can replace as you may remember in older vehicles.

418419420
Ford Taurus
Ford Explorer
Mercury Sable

What are some basic steps to diagnosing ABS brake warning lights on Taurus - Sable?

ABS, anti-lock brake systems are actually pretty basic:

  • Control module
  • Wheel sensor / 'exciter' ring (toothed gear integrated into end of axle shaft)
Diagnostics
  • Examine each wheel for physical problems
  • **
    • Mud & debris on the ring that could interfere with the sensor
    • Wiring - broken, frayed, corroded
    • Wiring connector - disconnected, corroded
  • Trouble codes
  • **
    • requires specialized scan tool (about $200)
    • As with engine codes, will provide more detailed information for diagnostics - such as a recurring code to a specific wheel as in my case.
    • Appears that most places charge to have codes read - I paid $45 at my favorite tire shop. Dealers, brakes shops, tire shops, some auto parts offer ABS scan / code retrieval
Repair
  • Wheel sensor
    • Sensor mounts into the back side of the steering knuckle with one small bolt. Can be stuck in the casting and take some effort to remove in one piece (in case you're trying to salvage it). Be patient and have good penetrating oil on hand.
    • Trace wiring - the front connectors are typically up behind the plastic wheel well liner for protection from the road elements - lots of sheet metal screws & more penetrating oil
    • Individual sensors range in price from about $45 and up
  • Control module
  • **
    • Not repairable and expensive (that's about all I know)
  • Bleeding the system
    • ABS systems are particularly sensitive to air in the lines - the control module gets upset by the presence of anything but fluid.
    • According to Chiltons procedure write-up, the ABS scanner needs to be used during bleeding process
    • The bleeding sequence goes Rt Ft, Lf Ft, Lf R, Rt R
    • sounds like it is a complete flushing of fluid - have a few jugs of fluid on hand

See "Related Questions" below for more ABS information

385386387
Air Conditioning and Coolant
Ford Taurus
Mercury Sable
Ford Expedition XLT

Where is the low side valve on a 3.0 Sable - Taurus air conditioning?

Be advised that I own and service a 2000 Taurus 3.0L OHV engine. The low side valve is located at the rear firewall near the right side \ passenger side strut tower and has a black plastic cap similar to a tire valve stem cap. Stay away from the high pressure side which on my vehicle is at the front right near the radiator. Not certain but believe R-12 Freon was being phased out about 1992 and the new refrigerant is R134a. You need of course to know what your AC system requires, R-12, or R134a. Then appropriate charging kit to add refrigerant.



Its located on the evaporator to accumulator suction line under the cowl panel...............
Buy a kit at Wal-Mart or auto parts comes with instructions
on the pasinger side there should be a silver looking tank on top there is a cap that is black pull off there is a thing that looks like a air valve on a tire get the recharge bottle from auto zone and put it on there
Follow the larger hose from the compressor - perhaps near the drier on the passenger side firewall
The low pressure port on a Ford Taurus is located next to the firewall. If you are looking from the front of the car, the port is on the far left side of the engine compartment.
The fill orfice is located near the aluminum "cylinder" near the firewall on the passenger side of the car, it is beneath the plastic shround near the firewall. This is the low pressure side of the system. Do not try and fill through the the high press. side located near the radiator! Wear safety googles!
on the passenger side firewall behind plastic sheild.
There is a big hose and a small hose at the compressor. The big hose is the low pressure.
Where is the low pressure side of the ac system on a 1999 ford taurus?" low pressure side is located near the fire wall on the left side.
Not hard at all, just buy the recharge kit at the auto parts store and follow the directions. The kit will only attach to the low side so you cannot make that mistake. The low pressure port will be near the compressor on a larger hose and will have a screw on cap with the letter L on it.
passenger side near the fire wall. the only one the freon hose fits.
It contains no Freon. It contains R-134. If it is low, you have a leak, that must be repaired before adding refrigrant. Take it to a professional.
There is a valve that looks like a tire air port that is located under the hood directly in front of the passenger seat. It is located on the right of the air compressor, in front of the fire wall. There should be a screw cap on top of the port. Crank your AC to the highest it will go, flip the cap on your refill, attach it to the port, shake can, and press.

367368369
Car Fuses and Wiring
Ford Taurus

Where can you find a fuse box diagram for 1996-2010 Ford Taurus?

There are 2 fuse boxes / fuse panels in nearly every Ford product: one directly above the driver's left foot (when the driver is actually sitting in the driver's seat). The other is inside the engine compartment, on the right side - contains high current fuses.The Owners Manuals have detailed illustrations and information regarding the two fuse box / panels, and the various vehicle systems each fuse connects to.

Keep reading for information & links to free online sources of Owners Manuals for 1996+ Ford & Mercury products information.

most fuse boxes and power distribution boxes have a cover or access plate over them. Usually, on the inside of this cover or plate is a pictorial diagram of the layout of all the fuse locations in that particular box. Each fuse or circuit breaker position will be labeled on that diagram. Sometimes the actual base plastic of the box has the description printed by each fuse in it. (These can be very hard to read).The fuse diagram is in the owners' manual. However, it is incomplete and ambiguous. Using terms like GEM and ICP. Nowhere, by the way, does it explain where the fuse for the parking and running lights is located.

Also, a lot of the chassis electrical run through the "GEM", the Generic Electronic Module. This is the "black box" that only the dealer can diagnose!

I have had all of the running lights and parking lights go out on my 2001 Sable.

Looks like we are destined to take the car to the dealer where they will use their magic boxes to diagnose the problem.

Underneath the driver-side dashboard is a gray box that says "pull to open." It blends in with everything around it and is difficult to see. It helps to have a flashlight to find it. The fuse box is underneath youre steering wheel on the lower left hand side right next to youre brake pedel. There is a cover to let your know were all of the fuses are.There are 2 fuse box locations. There is one under the left side of the dashboard just to the right of the emergency brake pedal. You will need to remove the black plastic cover by pressing the release clip on the top edge of the box. And the second location is a fuse and relay box on the right side of the engine compartment. Both locations have fuses and or relays in them.

In most cars, it is located on the left side inside. Open driver's door, look at side of dashboard, you should see a small inward round opening, pry it open toward you. The fusebox diagrams are detailed in the Owners Manual.

Under the dash on driver side, there is a lever that you pull and the box comes down.

In the engine comparment to the right fo the radiator.

The fuse box is located under the front dash on the driver's side. It is near the brake pedal. It will have a cover on it. There is also a power distribution box which contains fuses. It is located nust near the battery in the engine compartment. It will also have a cover.

I assume you mean the one inside the cabin of the vehicle. It's directly behind the driver side door , behind the panel in the dash. (side of the dash when you open the door)

Locate the fuse box with your owner's manual help. Find the location of the fuse that controls the defective circuit. Remove the fuse with a fuse removal tool, needle nose pliers, or small screw driver. Install new fuse of same amperage/ color. Problem not cured? Check all fuses plus fuses under the hood also.

373374375
Ford Taurus

How do you replace the headlamp assembly - bulb on a 1986-1995 Taurus?

1986-1988Taurus / Sables, the headlight assembly doesn't come out very easily - makes bulb replacement a job for someone with small hands. 1989-1995The headlamp assembly is much more easily removed, making headlight and turn signal bulb replacement a breeze.

According to the Chilton's manual, there are only 3 nylon u-shaped clips holding the headlamp assembly in.

After releasing the headlight assembly:
  1. Disconnect the electrical connector from the bulb. Now the headlamp is free to work with.
  2. Remove the bulb from the lamp assembly by pulling straight back.

    Do not twist, as there are alignment slots built into the lamp assembly socket. It may take some effort to remove the lamp because it has a rubber o-ring type seal - try a bit of wiggling side-to-side while pulling

  3. Insert new bulb into headlight assembly - don't touch the glass - use gloves, paper towel, or similar

    Make sure that the flat surface of the bulb socket is facing upward, and is firmly seated

  4. Re-attach retainer ring by rotating clockwise
  5. Reconnect the electrical harness
  6. Re-install headlamp assembly
NOTES">NOTES
  • Do not touch the glass of the new halogen bulb - the oils in the skin will shorten the life-span of the new bulb, or possibly cause the bulb to explode when first turned on

    If the bulb is accidentally touched, it should be cleaned with rubbing alcohol before being used

  • I would also suggest referring to the Owners Manual (if it's still around ;)) - it'll have illustrated instructions on bulb replacement procedures.

See "Related Questions" and "Related Links" below for more

Are you doing this because the lens is cloudy?

I had a problem with the lens hazing and using some aluminum polish to remove the haze.

Worked like a charm.

Reach around the back of the headlight, where the wires go into the headlight and turn the assembly counterclockwise. The bulb should then pull straight back. If you have a replacement bulb with you you could look at the locking hardware and figure out how it all connects.

it has to want to change... everyone should have a shop manual for their vehicle, and the library should have a professional shop manual(wiring diagrams and more detailed info) available in the reference section for FREE....make copies of the right sections, and fix it like a PRO!! good luck Dave

Only the bulb is replaced. Look for the bulb holder at the back of the light lens.

371372373
Ford Taurus

Where is the emergency fuel shut off inertia switch in a Ford Taurus - Mercury Sable?

The emergency shut-off, fuel reset, inertia switch - all referring to the same thing - is almost universally located in the back right corner of the vehicle.

In the case of a sedan, pull back the trunk liner to access the switch.

In a wagon, the reset/shutoff switch is behind an access panel on the right hand side of the cargo / kid area.

Recessed into the top of the switch is a red button - when it is tripped, you'll be able to push down on it and it'll click back into the on position.

This, and more is well detailed and illustrated in the Owners Manual - See "Related Questions" below for moreAnswerNormally you will find it a the trunk..at the left side near the middle of tear panel, sometimes behind the trim, its a little black box with a push button, red color..just press it an go.. AnswerTheir should be an acess door in one of the Plastic trim panels in the rear of the wagon compartment. You may try looking in the jack stowage compoartment.

There is a button inside of the trunk. You need to press it in to reset the shut off switch.

its on the passagers side of the trunk. There is usually a red and white tag that alludes to it.

AnswerLook in the left rear storage compartment or in one of the kick panels

in the trunk on the driver's side

AnswerIn the trunk. Left hand side there is is hole in the trunk liner that you can see a small red button through. Push the button in.

the switch is in the trunk behind an access panel on fuel fill side.

'In the trunk on Passenger side behind rear panel. There is usually a Sticker on the Felt inside the trunk stating that the Fuel Shut off switch is here. Just pull the trunk lining back from the top and you will see a switch with a Red colored button on the top, if it is already seemingly pressed down as far as it will go, then it does not need re-setting. Just press it and see if it will click down if it is up and it goes down 1/2" or so then you are probably good to go.

In the trunk, close to the back almost adjacent to the Fuel Fill cap on the outside of car.

AnswerIN THE TRUNK LEFT HAND SIDE BEHIND THE CARPET Answertry looking in the trunk, passenger side. should be a white sticker that mentions the switch. it is behind the gray "wall" inside the trunk.

It should be either in the trunk or the passenger or driver floorboard. To reset ot, push the button back down.

The 1998 Ford Taurus owners manual shows :

sedan - right side of trunk behind liner

station wagon - behind service panel on the right side of the cargo area

sedan , right side of trunk , behind trunk liner ( there should be an access hole )

wagon , right side of cargo area , behind service panel

AnswerLook froreset switch either in driver's side of trunk or in one of the kick panels AnswerSwtich is either in trunk left side or in one of the front kick panels AnswerThe manual fuel shut off switch is in behind the right rear plastic panel inside the car. There is a cover the you can remove and there should be a resetable switch there. Just push it. If it is not there search the area around there or the other side.

Inside the trunk, on the left side. It will say fuel pump switch. I have a 1992 Taurus GL. That's where mine is located.

AnswerShould be in the driver's side area of the trunk - push button Answerthere should be a switch inside the trunk. I think it's on the right hand side, above the wheelwell. turn it off then back on this should reset it. locationOn the right hand rear lower corner pillar reinforcment behind stoarage compartment panel.

In the trunk on the side marked Fuel shut off --there will be a hole you can put your finger into to reset the button if it was triped

Answerthe fuel cut off switch should be in the trunk, behind the cover panel on either the right or left side. AnswerLook either at the rear storage area left side behind panel or in either of the front kick panels

In the trunk. Same side as tank. On side above tire under panel. kind of a pain to get to but nust pull trunk paneling away to see. good luck.

371372373

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