Instrument Repair

Questions about how to maintain and repair your instrument belong here.

625 Questions
Musical Instruments
Instrument Repair
Trumpet

How much does a Jupiter Capital Edition Trumpet cost?

a new Jupiter captial edition is about $400 used and about $1000 new

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Instrument Repair
Guitars
Bass Guitar

How do you fix a guitar that the amplifier won't register?

If you have access to a digital multimeter, it is now time to make use of it. If you do not have a one, get a 1.5 Volt battery, alligator clips or wire, sill tape, and a small hand torch light bulb. First, make sure that the cable you are using is still working properly. Put the digital multimeter on the continuity setting and touch each probe to the tip of each cable end. Then do the same to the ground on each end. If there is continuity (the meter will produce a beeping sound) on both tip and ground your cable is fine. Alternatively, touch one side of the battery with the guitar cable and touch the other to one contact on the light bulb. Then touch the remaining contacts of the battery and the light bulb to the opposite ends of your guitar cable. If the light bulb lights up, your cable is fine. If there is no light, your cable is broken. You must test both tip and ground and both must light up. If the cable is fine and the guitar does not work, you need to remove the pick guard on Fender type guitars or the back cover on Gipson type guitars. You may also need to remove the jack plate. You must then use your digital multimeter. You can use the battery and light bulb, but it can get very fiddly. Check each wire that runs from the various switches, potentiometers (pots, volume and tone knobs), pick-ups and output jack. Check each wire from where it starts to where it ends. They must all show continuity or illuminate your light bulb. If one wire does not show continuity, you musts replace it or reattach it if it has poor contact to its solder point. If all wires are working, you need to test your switches. If the switch is in the on position, there must be continuity between the two wires attached to the switch. Otherwise, the switch is broken and must be fixed or replaced. Make sure all wires are properly attached to the switch. There are many types of switches and you might want to Google the subject to try getting a guitar building book or a basic electronic book.

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Musical Instruments
Instrument Repair
Woodwind Instruments

Can playing in cold temperatures damage a musical instrument?

It can make wooden instruments crack and metal ones play out of tune.

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Instrument Repair

What if your kurzweil mark 10w ensemble grand is not powering on does anyone know why?

Google search the hard reset procedure. It worked on mine.

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Musical Instruments
Instrument Repair
Piano

How much does it cost to get a cracked piano plate repaired?

It used to be assumed that if the plate were cracked, it was destroyed. Now there are ways to repair it. It is cast iron and can be welded by a welder with the proper equipment and skill, but it is very risky. It is possible to damage it more when trying to fix it.

However you must take into account that it will probably have to be moved to a shop and disassembled. You would probably need to restring it which would alone cost about $1000. Unless it was a very fine piano , I would turn it into a desk, and use the keys to make a nice lampbase, and sell the plate for scrap.

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Chevy Caprice Classic
Instrument Repair

Your dash lights will not come on on a caprice classic?

Check the fuse for the instrument lights, it may be blown. Another possibility is that you have inadvertently turned the instrument lights off. You can Rotate the headlight switch to adjust the instrument light brightness or to turn them off altogether.

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Instrument Repair
Percussion Instruments
Piano

What is the middle pedal on a piano called?

The middle pedal on a grand piano is called the "sostenuto" pedal. The left-most pedal is the "una corda" or "soft" pedal, and the right-most pedal is the "damper" pedal. The sostenuto pedal on a grand piano keeps the dampers up for the keys that are depressed at the time the pedal is depressed, thus allowing the sound of these strings to continue after the keys are released. You can continue to play the rest of the keys, even using the damper pedal, independently of the action of the sostenuto. As long as the sostenuto is depressed, those notes will continue to sound. So the pedal has to be used correctly, or some notes you don't intend to continue sounding will anyway.

On upright pianos, however, the middle pedal, if one exists, is typically a practice pedal, mute pedal or celeste pedal, which places a piece of felt between the hammers and the strings. This is intended to be used for quiet practicing, and it is rarely if ever used for musical purposes. Some uprights have a sort of mock-sostenuto pedal, which sustains only the lower strings. This is of fairly limited use. In some older uprights, the middle pedal is merely a duplicate of the left (soft) pedal. As a true sostenuto pedal requires a fairly complex mechanism, only very few uprights have one.

However, since it is used very infrequently, it is rarely missed by most players. The sostenuto pedal didn't become popular until 1874, when Steinway introduced it. Obviously, earlier composers did not use it! Even Debussy (1862 - 1918) did not have a piano with a sostenuto pedal. Many modern concert pianists avoid the sostenuto pedal entirely.

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Consumer Electronics
Electronics Engineering
Instrument Repair
Electrical Engineering

What is loading effect?

Large load impedance will draw a small load current and so loading of the source is small. (light load). A small load impedance will draw a large load current from the source. (heavy load).

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Musical Instruments
Instrument Repair
Piano

How do you stop the foot pedals on a piano from from squeaking?

Using oil is not recommended in a piano. It attracts dirt and grime. Call a piano tech or have them look at it when they tune it. It won't cost much have it fixed properly.

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You will need to access the mechanical linkings in the bottom most part of the piano. To do this, you will need to open the lower panel (usually a knob or metal type spring holds it in place) which will expose the mechanical linkings for the 3 pedals. Apply a light grade oil (sewing machine or hair clipper oil) to the pivot points nearest the actual pedals themselves. Work the pedals to make sure the oil penetrates the moving joints. Wipe up any excess oil that may have dripped onto the inside floor of the piano. Replace the lower panel (there are a couple guide pins that line up with holes in the bottom of the panel and secure in place. There is also a spring and connection behind the action that might be causing a little squeaking noise, too. To access this, remove the front panel that exposes the action (hammers, strings, etc). At either end is a know, unscrew this and remove, and gently tilt the action toward you. Look down between the strings and the action, and there should be a connection joint and/or spring. Place a few drops of the previously mentioned lubricating oil at the rod connection joint being extremely careful not to spill any on the rest of the mecanisms or hammers. Gently tilt the action back into place and again secure with the knobs.

717273
Instrument Repair
Guitars
Bass Guitar

How do you fix an input jack on a guitar amplifier?

One of the most common problems when dealing with a guitar amp is that the input jack becomes stressed from frequently pushing in the plug from the cord that goes to the guitar. This leads to crackling noises, or no noise at all. The 1/4" phone plugs, as they are called, are a couple inches long and serve as levers when inserted into the jack on the amplifier. The jack is surrounded by a nut that holds it tightly to the front plate of the amp, but the nut often loosens and sometimes falls off, allowing the jack to twist. Inside it is only held by a couple solder connections to a circuit board. The board itself has thin pieces of foil glued to its surface which serve as "wires". So, all that is holding the jack is a press-fit into the board and a couple thin foil strips. When rocked as described, these foils often break, although since they are glued to the board, the break may not be obvious. Generally they will break right where they are attached to the jack. So, observing all the normal safety precautions, like unplugging the amp, remove all the nuts holding any other jacks or pots (volume controls etc.) that are attached to the printed circuit board so you can remove it from the amp. Then locate the terminals from the jack on the underside of the board and carefully scrape the enamel from the foil "wires" leading away from the terminals with a dull knife for about 1/4". Heat the terminal and the foil with a 25 watt soldering iron, and allow the solder to run from the terminal along the length of foil that you have exposed. In severe cases you may need to add a bit of wire from the terminal running along the foil. Check to make sure you have a good connection with an ohmeter, if you have one. Reassemble the unit, ensuring that you tighten, or replace if missing, the nut that holds the jack to the metal panel of the amp so it doesn't happen again.

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Flats and Tire Pressure
Painting and Staining
Instrument Repair
Care of Horses

How do you fix paint that has run?

Unfortunately, you have to sand off the run then paint it again. Depending on the paint type, you should use emery paper and keep it wet while you sand.

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Instrument Repair
Spain

What is a person native to central Spain called?

A person from central Spain is a Madrileno (with a tilde over the "n"). One from Madrid. Good luck!

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Instrument Repair
Percussion Instruments
Piano

What do you do if piano keys don't play?

Is this an acoustic piano, that requires no electronics? Or, an electic keyboard? The acoustic needs maintenance work. Loosen the mechanics, that type of thing. The wood might be warped. The electric needs a connection or something turned on. If it's a real piano, call a piano tuner, they do repairs. If it's electric in any way, you need either a shop that fixes keyboards or a new keyboard.

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Lawn Mowers and Garden Tools
Instrument Repair
Mosquitoes

How do you fix a mosquito magnet?

Depends on what's wrong right? The most common problem is the flame constantly blowing out. The orific that supplies gas to these magnets is very tiny and over time can accumulate enough residue to clog sufficiently to start going out. With a little know-how and a few simble tools the orifice can be removed and cleaned with acetone or alcohol. You may need to drip some into the hollow portion of the orifice and then blow it through given the tiny size of the hole. Don't try stick pins or anything though. The size of the orifice is important to the correct flame size.

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Recommend reading through all the responses to synthesize your own troubleshooting methodology.

There is a good overview of MM operation at http://gra.midco.net/jmanley/.

A forum devoted to fixing MMs is at http://mosquitomagnet.freeforums.org/.

Here is how I fixed My Mosquito Magnet Liberty Plus: I charged the battery full, shot 3 CO2 Cartridges one after another, gave it a try. It would not start. I then attached a more robust power supply and attempted to start with the power supply plugged in (jump start). This worked in just a few seconds. The next gas run-out I tried the normal start, no luck after several tries. I tried the "Jump Start" again with the 12 volt power supply and it started right up in less than a minute. I used a 12 volt supply designed for a 12 volt TV. I cut the wires off the old supply and connected white to white, black to black. I used my Multi Meter and read 8.9 volts off my charged battery and 15 volts off the power supply. I suppose that since the fan and igniter is rated 12 volts it works fine. I unplug the supply immediately after I feel heat coming from the black emitter tube where the Octonol is. I talked to a tech that was trained by Applied Biophysics and he said not to leave the power supply plugged in more than 40 minutes. I think this is to protect the battery from too much charging power.

Based on a little net searching, the MM has a tendency to stop working after a few seasons. (My MM Defender stopped in the middle of its 3rd season. Had to disassemble several times before I could get it to run.)

If you consider the circuit board as a single component, then there are only a handful of components to a MM. There is the power supply, liquid propane (LP) connector, LP 1-way valve, LP hose, LP mixing chamber, Schrader valve, LP solenoid valve, LP sprayer, ignitor, thermocouple, catalytic converter, fan, combustion chamber, and circuit board.

In simple terms, when you power on the unit, it's supposed to turn on the fan and get good airflow through the combustion chamber. After that's established, the igitor is energized, the solenoid valve is engaged, and the LP is released into the sprayer. The sprayer sprays the LP into the combustion chamber where the ignitor burns the LP. A thermocouple is there to provide feedback on the combustion. Any CO from the reaction gets converted to CO2 by the catalytic converter before exiting the head. The Schrader valve (which is normally closed) is there to allow you to put some compressed CO2 through the sprayer to clear any clogs (of course, with the unit off and unplugged from the LP).

For thorough troubleshooting, you may need a multi-meter, #2 and #3 Phillips head screwdrivers, a handful of wrenches, some high-temperature silicone adhesive, a 12-volt DC power supply, pipe-tape and other miscellany.

The power supply converts power from a standard outlet into 12-volt DC. If you turn on your MM and nothing happens, maybe the power supply is dead. (I ran over my cord with a lawnmower in its 2nd season.) To test, plug in the power supply and use a multi-meter to see if 12-volts DC is coming out of the end that plugs into the MM head. If not, unplug the supply and check for shorts/opens in the cords. If no shorts/opens, then you might need to replace the whole power supply (which I think can be purchased from the manufacturer). If the power supply is OK but nothing goes on, then it probably is bad news as the circuit board or switches/lights may be fried. You can try to troubleshoot and substitute parts, but you might also need more. If the power supply is OK, lights are going on, but something else isn't working, you probably need to dismantle the head.

Remove the head from the LP tank, stand, and power supply. (#2 and #3 Phillips head screwdrivers worked for me.) Advice: Dismantle this outdoors, as insects can take up residence in the head unit and may infest your home if you repair indoors! (Yes, I did this by accident!) To remove the innards, you'll have to use a wrench and remove the 1-way valve from the hose.

Inspect the LP connector, 1-way valve, and hose for damage. My guess is that these parts are robust enough that they shouldn't give a problem, but if they are dirty, you should be able to clean them out (e.g. with alcohol or mineral spirits and a bit of compressed air to dry).

Unplug things from the circuit board. Bravely now, dismantle the combustion chamber (i.e. the big, heavy metal thing which is most of the head unit) by unscrewing the 4-5 screws holding the 2 halves together. There is some silicone adhesive holding the 2 halves together, so this may take a little leverage and some elbow grease. Once apart, use this as an opportunity to clean the inside of the unit, including the cylindrical catalytic converter, with mineral spirits.

The LP hose, mixing chamber, Schrader valve, solenoid valve, and LP sprayer should still be together as a unit. Using a wrench, unscrew the LP sprayer from the mixing chamber, and soak the sprayer in mineral spirits for ~60 min and dry thoroughly. (The sprayer is a little sensitive, and can get clogged with impurities from the LP tanks.) If need be, you should be able to unscrew the Schrader valve with a wrench and replace with a new valve from an auto parts dealer. Once you clean the sprayer, put a little pipe tape on the threads and reassemble the LP hose, mixing chamber, Schrader, solenoid, and sprayer. You can test the solenoid valve by applying 12 volts DC to the plugs and listen for the valve to 'click'. Am not sure of the best way of testing these other parts, but you can theoretically connect it up to your LP tank, trigger the solenoid valve, and see or listen for the spray. For the brave, you could even use a lighter to check for the spray.

To check the ignitor, carefully unscrew it from the combustion chamber, and plug it and the power supply into the circuit board. After turning on the unit and waiting a short time, the ignitor should turn bright, hot red. If it doesn't, you can replace with more robust units that are sold on eBay.

To check the thermocouple, carefully uncrew it from the combustion chamber, and connect the terminals to a multi-meter. As you heat the thermocouple (with say a lighter), the ohms should decrease significantly. This should be a simple thing to replace, but am not sure where to purchase replacements if it's not working. Note that the thermocouple is held in place by a flimsy nylon screw. Replacement screws can be purchased at just about any home store. Have heard of others replacing it with a ceramic screw.

You should be able to test the fan by applying 12 volt DC to the terminals. If it doesn't turn on, you can probably find a replacement at DigiKey.

Once you've cleaned and tested everything, you can reassemble the combustion chamber by using high-temp silicone adhesive (found at auto parts stores). Be sure to apply the adhesive ONLY in the same areas as where the previous adhesive was applied.

Once the combustion chamber is back together, you can plug everything back into the circuit board, reassemble, and screw everything back. (Again, use a little pipe tape on the threads of any of the LP lines.)

Haven't tried this yet, but to prevent future clogging, I'll try to use the compressed CO2 cartridges with the Schrader valve (as recommended by the manufacturer) to try and keep the sprayer from clogging.

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I have been struggling with MM Defender that won't start.

How do you get the orifice out? Does the gas feed part simply unscrew from the burner casting, or do I need to split the two halves of the casting apart? I have been tempted to port and polish the part...maybe it needs some higher gas flow to burn with more vigor?

From a technical perspective, I have figured the whole thing out, cept how to get the thing to light and stay lit. I have taken apart the gas valve and carefully fed a thin copper wire on through to inside the combustion chamber and forced air through the whole thing. I have tested the ignitor, the gas valve, and the thermistor. I have even created my own spark-ignition system to replace the hot suface ignition (and ironically, stood there getting bit by mosquitoes as I continually pull the trigger on my piezo lighter gizmo). I also connected a second thermistor to the burner case so I can monitor the temperature of the burner with the case on.

Inside parts: There is a control board which has connections for the 12V AC power supply, the fan, the gas valve, the thermistor, the ignitor, and the power switch/lamp assembly.

The startup sequence runs the fan for about 2 minutes, then the 12vdc gas valve opens (the fan is slowed for about ten seconds when the valve opens). The 12V hot surface ignitor then powers up (goes cherry red) and stays on for the remainder of the 'trying to start' time which is something like 3 or 4 minutes until the unit either goes steady-red (running) or goes to fast-blink (failed to start) and closes gas valve and shuts down ignitor. The fan runs for awhile then shuts off. The control board has all the timing logic on a couple of chips, rectification circuitry to convert AC to DC, transistors to switch power on/off for the ignitor, fan, and valve, as well as the sensor input from the thermistor.

Closer to the gas valve is a 12V hot surface ignitor module (thicker wires) that glows nice and red when it's supposed to. At the rear of the burner casting is a thermistor (skinny wires) (temperature-variable resistor) that connects to the control board so the unit knows if it started or not. Of course there is a 12V fan in there, which is a three-wire fan (which either means it has a tach lead or it's a variable-speed fan). On the input side there is a 12V solenoid valve. (Note for parts: you can get a replacement ignitor on eBay...it's a 12v glo-stix from www.crystaltechnica.com. The valve is made by Peter Paul Electronics)

My next project is to try to take the orifice all the way out, perhaps inspect the catalyst directly by splitting the casting apart, and possibly going full-manual (running gas valve, fan, and ignitor with 12VDC source) and monitoring temp with the thermistor I bolted to the burner casting. I have also thought about drilling an inpection hole in the casting so I can see if the catalyst lights or not.

On the lighter side, I have considered adding a liquid-oxygen auxillary ignition system (this is a joke), or adding some other starting enhancement like ether, carbon tetrachloride, or gasoline. (these too are likely to kill more than just mosquitoes). I have also considered adding a gas guage to the unit so I can tell if propane gas is flowing or not, and if it is flowing at correct rate.

And here is mystery of the universe: How the heck do you tell if a propane tank needs to be purged of air?? Won't it just purge itself if I let it leak out by leaving the gas fitting loose??? Is there a fuel-air meter for propane I can buy?? (Heated oxygen sensor may not work properly---hee hee). I've got two propane tanks that the supplier says have been purged...but how can you tell???

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After trying all of these things unsuccessully, I scoured through Google to find more information. I needed my mosquito trap repair done. Not that the above info is not good, it just didn't work for my liberty. After what seemed like weeks of research, I was weighing my options. Keep messing with it and possibly never get it going................ or send it in to have it repaired. Well another week went by and after calling ALL, and I mean ALL of the service places on the web, the cheapest I could find was mosquito control technology. They had a $19 tuneup special. I had to pay return freight of course, but after sending it to them I found out it was only a faulty ignitor. It cost me 20 extra bucks to have it installed and they shipped it out. Pretty painless soprisingly. Only out about 50 bucks or so, anymore and I'm not sure I would have done it. oh yah go to www.mosquitomagnetrepair.com that's where I went.

Steven in VA

skwanto@lavabit.com

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Instrument Repair
Guitars
Bass Guitar
String Instruments

How many strings are in a folk guitar?

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Guitars
Instrument Repair

Can you put nine gauge strings on a Les Paul?

Yes you can put 9 gauge strings on a Les Paul, and any other electric guitar. If you are switching from a different gauge you must re-innotate your guitar so the neck has the right amount of tension on it, to much or to little tension and it is bad for the neck.

555657
Instrument Repair
Trombone
Pens and Pencils

How do you get a pencil out of a trombone?

Considering the fact that it's highly unlikely that a pencil wedged itself into the crook of the slide, just remove the outer slide and it should fall right out.Blow real hard,i wonder how a pencil get stuck in the trombone?

But seriously you might try a coat hanger to hook behind it and dislodge it so it will fall out.

Ask a professional to remove it for you. You could try using a cleaning snake to get it out. Or, just don't get it stuck in the first place.

Are you serious? If it's stuck in the bell try getting your cleaning snake attached with something and see if that helps, If its stuck in the slide take the outer part off and use your snake again with something attached Trust me I know I have played trombone for the past six years

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Get a repairman to do it. You could do some expensive damage trying to remove it yourself. it would be very hard to get a pencil stuck unless it was very short.

555657
Instrument Repair
Violin

How much would maintenance for a violin cost?

There is very little maintenance needed for a violin: IF it is in good condition when you purchase, and IF it is taken care of as to storage and everyday handlling. Strings do not have to be replaced that often if you use high quality.

how clumsy are you? i mean i dont remember dropping my violin, i polish it after i use it, expensive (you dont need to but its better) rosin regularly. methylated spirits or something ive heard are good for cleaning if its really dirty but dont use it often. if you leave rosin dust on the strings and body then it can be absorbed and reduce the sound quality. but really it depends on how much youre bothered about your violin. if its cheap, fairly temporary and used for lower grades then does it really matter but if it cost thousands id be very careful!

Most strings should be changed once every 6 months depending on how much you play. If you make sure you wipe off excess rosin from strings and body of violin you will not need to polish it/clean it. Also i find tipping a bit of UNCOOKED rice into the f holes then turning them round and tipping them out again gets a lot of the dust out from inside your violin. YOu'd be surprised how much is in there.

You can clean your violin as well.

To clean the body of the instrument, you can use a soft cloth and a cleaner like pledge.

To clean the strings and the fingerboard you can use rubbing alcohol but be very very careful not to get this on the body of your instrument as it can damage it. Q-tips are usually best for this.

if you wipe your violin with a soft cloth before you put it away everytime it will help cut down on the build up you experience as well.

If you take care of your violin, the cost wouldn't be that much, maybe around $50-$60 for new strings and rosin. If you damage your violin though, it can cost way more. Depending on where the damage is and how extensive it is, the cost to repair it can vary.

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Instrument Repair
Percussion Instruments

Parts of xylophone?

There is the frame, the resonators, the keys, and the string (which runs through the bars).

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Instrument Repair
Guitars
Bass Guitar

What is a truss rod?

It's a long rod lodged up in the neck of a guitar used for keeping the neck of the guitar straight.

The truss rod is used to allow the neck to bend either way in response to the tension of the strings. Without it, there would be no steel string guitars, the neck wouldn't be able to handle the tension of the strings. Many beginners think that adjusting the truss rod will lower the "action" or how high the strings are from the fret board of the guitar. This is not entirely true and it is probably more of a Nut and saddle/bridge adjustment that is needed.

495051
Instrument Repair
Guitars
Bass Guitar

How do you fix a guitar that buzzes when the bottom strings are fretted?

If an adjustable bridge,slightly raise the end a teeny bit at atime and check for buzz.If not adjustable,you may be able to pack up the white insert on the end that needs lifting.It wont need much.If that no good then find the offending fret by fretting the string all along the fretboard,one fret at a time.Where it first buzzes is the problem fret.Then,get a small block of wood and place it on the fret and tap it with a hammer.This may take several attempts.Failing that,neck could be twisted and out of your league.

It could be several things, You question is kindly vague.. Here are some symptoms. You will have to pick thru and find the relief.. Buzzes in one particular spot, Frets are not on level. Fret is rising out of fingerboard. Secure all loose frets , level and dres. Fret leveling and/or replacement of worn frets. Buzzes on open strings only, Nut, slots in nuts are too deep, worn or poorly cut. Replace nut or shim to add height, set up instrument properly. If it's buzzing on the bottom 6 frets, the truss rod may be too tight, The bridge may be loose, or too high, there are several things that could be wrong here. I would take a look at the frets though. Start there. Then work your way down the list. If it's not an expensive guitar I wouldn't spend alot of money into finding whats wrong. I have some vintage ones that it would be worth it, but if its just a cheapy.. don't waste the money cause it could cost a fortune. Get your guitar 'set-up' by a pro guitar technician. A cheap stereo chorus can sometimes induce a buzz from certain notes, but your guitar is probably in need of a good service. Pro guitar repair is the way to go. Don't take chances with your baby! You can find and contact local guitar repair shops here: www.RepairMyGuitar.com

495051
Instrument Repair
Trumpet

Why is the third valve on your trumpet making my notes sound weird?

well there can be many different reasons for that

1. your val could have not been put in properly therefore take it out and put it back in and twist it until it clicks.

2. it could be sticking because of not being oiled therefore oil it.

3. you may have bashed it therefore damaging the insides of ur trumpet therefore take it to a trumpet repair shop but take it to your teacher first to make sure this is the case.

if you have tried all of these speak to your trumper tutor and im sure she can help. hope this has been useful.

434445
Musical Instruments
Instrument Repair
Piano

What do the foot pedals do on a piano?

In order---soft, hold, loud

Leftmost pedal: Pianissimo: moves the hammers closer to the strings that produce a softer sound. On grand pianos (horizontal instrument) the entire keyboard moves to the right allowing the hammers to hit only one string instead of 3 strings as they normally would.

Middle pedal: Different manufacturers perform different tasks:

- some sustain the lower notes only, like from tenor c downwards,

- others (Young Chang for instance) drop a piece of felt between the hammers and the strings, producing a very subdued tone - used more for practicing as opposed to performance.

Rightmost pedal: Sustain Pedal. Not necessarily a "loud" pedal. Loudness is accomplished by how much weight one uses when playing the piano keys. A heavier touch produces a louder sound - one can hold the sustain pedal down and produce very soft music, too. When this pedal is depressed, the dampers are pulled away from all the strings. As long as this pedal is used, all strings will continue to resonate until they stop vibrating.

414243
Instrument Repair
Computer Keyboards
Piano

How do I fix stuck piano keys?

Call a reputable piano tuner in your area. They should be able to fix it or refer you to someone who can.-----------------------------------------

Piano keys stick for a variety of reasons. It is easily repaired by a technician. But if you like to tinker you can find out why it is sticking and repair it, It may just be that something like a coin fell between the keys.

434445
Instrument Repair
Guitars
The Difference Between

Can you mix classical strings on a classical guitar?

Not a good idea! You must have consistency of matter and gauge. To improve upon this above answer:

Actually, this isn't completely right. I've been playing classical guitar professionally for 30 years and many classical guitarists, including myself, mix "brands" of strings. I might love a particular brand of bass strings (strings 4, 5, and 6) but hate that brand's trebles. I know of players who even prefer one company's "b" string over every other brand, and that's the only brand of b string they will use. Classical guitar strings are all pretty much the same gauge, but tensions and materials vary, (composites are making inroads) so that might be a characteristic that you might want to keep consistent, no matter how many different brands of strings make up a full set for your tastes.

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