Obstetrics & Gynecology

Obstetrics & Gynecology is a branch of medicine that provides care for women, whether pregnant or not.

583 Questions
Nursing
Job Descriptions
Obstetrics & Gynecology

What does obstetrics nurse do?

For the source and more detailed information concerning your request, click on the related links section (U.S. Department of Labor) indicated directly below this answer section.

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Women's Health
Surgery and Hospitalization
Obstetrics & Gynecology

Gynecology what is a leap procedure?

Although pronounced "leap," the procedure is actually LEEP, or loop electrosurgical excision procedure. When performing LEEP, the doctor will use a loop electrode to remove a portion of the cervix. During LEEP, a high-intensity electrical current is passed through the loop-electrode, allowing the doctor to shave off a thin slice of cervical tissue. This slice of tissue can be examined under a microscope to check for abnormal cells, if the purpose of LEEP was diagnosis. LEEP can also be used to remove any tissue that may be found to be cancerous or pre-cancerous once it is found. A local anesthetic is administered to the patient before the procedure, and sometimes pain medication is prescribed to ease postoperative discomfort.

This "growth" that the doctor is removing is a vague term. Most "growths" removed by this procedure will be determined to be what is called "cervical dysplasia." Cervical dysplasia is a term used to describe abnormal cells that are at high risk of becoming cancerous, but are not cancer yet. Whatever the results of microscopic evaluation, the problem is often cured by the L.E.E.P. Therefore, L.E.E.P. is both a biopsy and a removal of the abnormal tissue (a cure if you will) all at once. Avoid tampons and sex for four weeks after procedure. One of the side effects of LEEP procedure is inability for the cervix to dilate during labor for childbirth, greatly increasing a woman's chance of c-section. There are alternative medicines available for cervical dysplasia.

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Health
Obstetrics & Gynecology

Full form of NT in ultrasound in gynaecology?

Nuchal Translucency

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Obstetrics & Gynecology

Does placenta anterior upper uterine segment grade you maturity mean a girl?

The placement of the placenta in the uterus has absolutely no relationship to the sex of the child.

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Obstetricians
Obstetrics & Gynecology

Can you just be a obstetrics instead of being both obstetrics and gynecologist?

The medical specialty is Obstetrics and Gynecology, so when you are in training you will learn both subsets of the field. Once you graduate, you can choose to only practice in certain parts of it, but you are trained to do both.

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Job Training and Career Qualifications
Obstetrics & Gynecology

What is Obstetrics?

Obstetricians provide surgical care for women during pregnancy and childbirth. They also handle postnatal care. Obstetricians closely work with the pediatricians and neonatologists to deal with the care of the newborn baby to reduce the chances of mortality and disease of a newborn baby.

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Job Training and Career Qualifications
High School
Obstetrics & Gynecology

What subjects do you take in high school to become a gynecologist?

The subjects you study in high school aren't nearly as important as the subjects you take in college, but I would still take more science and math courses.

In college, you don't need a particular major to become a doctor, but it helps to take lots of science and math classes.
Well to be honest with you, employers aren't going to loo at your high school record but take as many advanced classes as possible and as many science (particularly anatomy and biology) and math classes as you can. Those are going to be the most important.

535455
Qatar
Nursing
Obstetrics & Gynecology

Job vacancy for nurse in Kuwait airlines?

job vacancy

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Conditions and Diseases
Skin Care
Skin Disorders
Midwives and Doulas
Obstetrics & Gynecology

37 weeks with 2nd - really itchy skin - cream doctor prescribed not helping - should you tell your midwife - heard could be a sign of obstetric cholestasis?

Itching is often the only symptom noticed by a woman who suffers from ICP. The itching will typically increase in severity until either treatment is implemented or delivery takes place. The itching is often more pronounced on the bottom of the hands and feet and will increase with blood flow. Although itching sounds like a minor symptom, to a woman who suffers with ICP, it can be a life hindering problem. Loss of sleep, loss of appetite, and an inability to perform normal daily tasks can be a result of the intense itching! Please keep in mind that some itching is normal in pregnancy. ICP itching is usually distinguished by the fact that a woman will itch all over her entire body. Some women scratch themselves so frantically that they make themselves bleed. It is important to note that itching is often overlooked by doctors because of the fact that it is often a normal side affect of pregnancy. If a woman finds herself itching more than normal, it is important she request a Serum Bile Acid test as soon as possible. Dark Urine

The biochemical reactions that take place during ICP often create darker colored urine. You might notice that after you urinate that the toilet looks much darker than normal. This can be a sign of dehydration, but can be caused by ICP as well. Jaundice Although it is more uncommon to have jaundice in the mother, it does sometimes occur during ICP. If you notice a pale yellow appearance to the skin or eyes, please seek medical attention. Fatigue

Although fatigue is very common all throughout pregnancy, ICP can also cause fatigue due to the large role the liver plays in the metabolization process. ICP an also cause fatigue through stress, loss of sleep, and the malabsorption of some vitamins and minerals. Premature Labor

Another possible sign and symptom of ICP is the onset of premature labor. Early delivery in mothers with ICP is encouraged, but delivering too early can be dangerous. You may wish to talk to your doctor about taking precautions such as taking a steroid shot to help the baby with developing his or her lungs. Symptoms NOT Usually Associated With ICP

A rash is not usually associated with ICP, although one many develop that is caused by all the scratching. Some women report having splotchy, red, hot to-the-touch, hands and feet. It is not normal for ICP to worsen after delivery. If this happens, more testing should be done to rule an underlying liver disorder. However, it should be noted that in severe cases of cholestasis or after repeated cases, it can take several months for liver functions to return to normal. Some women have reported it taking as long as a full year for blood work to return to pre-ICP levels.

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Jobs & Education
Obstetrics & Gynecology

What education do you need to specialize in adolescent gynecology?

If you are in college right now talk with an advisor. They will help you out anyway that they can. You usually need to go to school 8 years for a doctor and 4 years for a registered nurse. Take courses in biology, micro biology, anatomy, physiology, sociology, and so forth, but talk with an adivsor. If you are in high school then talk with a guidance counselor and they can help you out. But in high school take biology, and any of the above classes if your high school offers them. Good luck with you and God Bless:)

If you want to be a doctor who specializes in Adolescent gynecology, there are two routes. You can first become a pediatrician and then take a fellowship in adolescent medicine or adolescent gynecology, or you can first become an Ob/Gyn, and then take a fellowship in pediatric and adolescent gynecology. For either route, it would take a minimum of 14 years after graduation from high school.

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Job Training and Career Qualifications
Obstetrics & Gynecology

How long would you have to go to college to become a gynecology?

In order to be an gynecologist, one must graduate from college and then from medical school. You can go to any college for undergraduate work as long as you take the classes required to get into medical school. Most people take four or five years to complete undergraduate work and then four years to graduate from medical school. After medical school, you would need to complete a residency in obstetrics/gynecology, which is generally four years. Hope that helps! Dr. B.

353637
Women's Health
Obstetrics & Gynecology

What is the origin or history of gynecology?

You almost make it sound like a hobby. Gynecology exists for the same reasons that Dentistry, Podiatry and Psychology exist. There was (is) a definite need for it in order for us to live longer lives. Regarding the history, each country has its own history in introducing Gynecological services. Go to "Google.com" and type in "history of gynecology."

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Nursing
Obstetrics & Gynecology

What is the goal of the nursing care plan in neonatal jaundice?

To minimize complications of jaundice and intervene as early as possible.

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Job Training and Career Qualifications
South Africa
Colleges and Universities
Obstetrics & Gynecology

What are considered the Top 5 schools of gynecology in South Africa?

Univ. of Cape Town, Univ. of Pretoria, Univ. of Natal, Univ. of Orange Free State, and Medical Univ. of South Africa.

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Salary and Pay Rates
Obstetrics & Gynecology

How much money does an obstetrics gynocologist earn?

An OB/GYN can earn anywhere between $150,000 - $500,000 per year based on years of experience.

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Obstetrics & Gynecology

Give some examples of experimental research titles?

There are new experiments taking place in research every day. Some examples of experimental research titles that could be used on topics effecting the people of today include "Are schools that allow prayer stronger than schools that don't?", "Is television or video games leading to more school violence?", or "Does lack of nutrition play a role in the crimes committed?".

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Job Training and Career Qualifications
Salary and Pay Rates
Bachelors Degrees
Obstetrics & Gynecology

How many years do you have to go to college to specialize in obstetrics nursing?

There are three options to become a registered nurse as follows.

  • diploma program (typically three years, not recommended for individuals who do not have an already existing degree)
  • associate degree (two years as a full-time student once the student starts the professional phase of the program)
  • bachelor's degree (BSN) (four years as a full-time student)

For the source and more detailed information concerning your request, click on the related links section (U.S. Department of Labor) indicated at the bottom of this answer box.

There are three options to become a registered nurse as follows.

  • diploma program (typically three years, not recommended for individuals who do not have an already existing degree)
  • associate degree (two years as a full-time student once the student starts the professional phase of the program)
  • bachelor's degree (BSN) (four years as a full-time student)

For the source and more detailed information concerning your request, click on the related links section (U.S. Department of Labor) indicated at the bottom of this answer box.

There are three options to become a registered nurse as follows.

  • diploma program (typically three years, not recommended for individuals who do not have an already existing degree)
  • associate degree (two years as a full-time student once the student starts the professional phase of the program)
  • bachelor's degree (BSN) (four years as a full-time student)

For the source and more detailed information concerning your request, click on the related links section (U.S. Department of Labor) indicated at the bottom of this answer box.

There are three options to become a registered nurse as follows.

  • diploma program (typically three years, not recommended for individuals who do not have an already existing degree)
  • associate degree (two years as a full-time student once the student starts the professional phase of the program)
  • bachelor's degree (BSN) (four years as a full-time student)

For the source and more detailed information concerning your request, click on the related links section (U.S. Department of Labor) indicated at the bottom of this answer box.

There are three options to become a registered nurse as follows.

  • diploma program (typically three years, not recommended for individuals who do not have an already existing degree)
  • associate degree (two years as a full-time student once the student starts the professional phase of the program)
  • bachelor's degree (BSN) (four years as a full-time student)

For the source and more detailed information concerning your request, click on the related links section (U.S. Department of Labor) indicated at the bottom of this answer box.

There are three options to become a registered nurse as follows.

  • diploma program (typically three years, not recommended for individuals who do not have an already existing degree)
  • associate degree (two years as a full-time student once the student starts the professional phase of the program)
  • bachelor's degree (BSN) (four years as a full-time student)

For the source and more detailed information concerning your request, click on the related links section (U.S. Department of Labor) indicated at the bottom of this answer box.

789
Bachelors Degrees
Obstetrics & Gynecology

What courses are needed to be an obstetrics nurse?

In all States and the District of Columbia, students must graduate from an approved nursing program and pass a national licensing examination, known as the NCLEX-RN, in order to obtain a nursing license. Nurses may be licensed in more than one State, either by examination or by the endorsement of a license issued by another State. Currently 18 States participate in the Nurse Licensure Compact Agreement, which allows nurses to practice in member States without recertifying. All States require periodic renewal of licenses, which may involve continuing education.

There are three major educational paths to registered nursing: A bachelor's of science degree in nursing (BSN), an associate degree in nursing (ADN), and a diploma. BSN programs, offered by colleges and universities, take about 4 years to complete. In 2004, 674 nursing programs offered degrees at the bachelor's level. ADN programs, offered by community and junior colleges, take about 2 to 3 years to complete. About 846 RN programs in 2004 granted associate degrees. Diploma programs, administered in hospitals, last about 3 years. Only 69 programs offered diplomas in 2004. Generally, licensed graduates of any of the three types of educational programs qualify for entry-level positions as staff nurses.

Many RNs with an ADN or diploma later enter bachelor's programs to prepare for a broader scope of nursing practice. Often, they can find a staff nurse position and then take advantage of tuition reimbursement benefits to work toward a BSN by completing an RN-to-BSN program. In 2004, there were 600 RN-to-BSN programs in the United States. Accelerated master's degree programs in nursing also are available. These programs combine 1 year of an accelerated BSN program with 2 years of graduate study. In 2004, there were 137 RN-to-MSN programs.

Accelerated BSN programs also are available for individuals who have a bachelor's or higher degree in another field and who are interested in moving into nursing. In 2004, more than 165 of these programs were available. Accelerated BSN programs last 12 to 18 months and provide the fastest route to a BSN for individuals who already hold a degree.

Individuals considering nursing should carefully weigh the advantages and disadvantages of enrolling in a BSN program, because, if they do, their advancement opportunities usually are broader. In fact, some career paths are open only to nurses with a bachelor's or master's degree. A bachelor's degree often is necessary for administrative positions and is a prerequisite for admission to graduate nursing programs in research, consulting, and teaching, and all four advanced practice nursing specialties-clinical nurse specialists, nurse anesthetists, nurse midwives, and nurse practitioners. Individuals who complete a bachelor's receive more training in areas such as communication, leadership, and critical thinking, all of which are becoming more important as nursing care becomes more complex. Additionally, bachelor's degree programs offer more clinical experience in nonhospital settings. In 2004, 417 nursing schools offered master's degrees, 93 offered doctoral degrees, and 46 offered accelerated BSN-to-doctoral programs.

All four advanced practice nursing specialties require at least a master's degree. Most programs last about 2 years and require a BSN degree and some programs require at least 1 to 2 years of clinical experience as an RN for admission. In 2004, there were 329 master's and post-master's programs offered for nurse practitioners, 218 master's and post-master's programs for clinical nurse specialists, 92 programs for nurse anesthetists, and 45 programs for nurse midwives. Upon completion of a program, most advanced practice nurses become nationally certified in their area of specialty. In some States, certification in a specialty is required in order to practice that specialty.

All nursing education programs include classroom instruction and supervised clinical experience in hospitals and other health care facilities. Students take courses in anatomy, physiology, microbiology, chemistry, nutrition, psychology and other behavioral sciences, and nursing. Coursework also includes the liberal arts for ADN and BSN students.

Supervised clinical experience is provided in hospital departments such as pediatrics, psychiatry, maternity, and surgery. A growing number of programs include clinical experience in nursing care facilities, public health departments, home health agencies, and ambulatory clinics.

Nurses should be caring, sympathetic, responsible, and detail oriented. They must be able to direct or supervise others, correctly assess patients' conditions, and determine when consultation is required. They need emotional stability to cope with human suffering, emergencies, and other stresses.

Some RNs start their careers as licensed practical nurses or nursing aides, and then go back to school to receive their RN degree. Most RNs begin as staff nurses, and with experience and good performance often are promoted to more responsible positions. In management, nurses can advance to assistant head nurse or head nurse and, from there, to assistant director, director, and vice president. Increasingly, management-level nursing positions require a graduate or an advanced degree in nursing or health services administration. They also require leadership, negotiation skills, and good judgment.

Some nurses move into the business side of health care. Their nursing expertise and experience on a health care team equip them to manage ambulatory, acute, home-based, and chronic care. Employers-including hospitals, insurance companies, pharmaceutical manufacturers, and managed care organizations, among others-need RNs for health planning and development, marketing, consulting, policy development, and quality assurance. Other nurses work as college and university faculty or conduct research.

Foreign-educated nurses wishing to work in the United States must obtain a work visa. Applicants are required to undergo a review of their education and licensing credentials and pass a nursing certification and English proficiency exam, both conducted by the Commission on Graduates of Foreign Nursing Schools. (The commission is an immigration-neutral, nonprofit organization that is recognized internationally as an authority on credentials evaluation in the health care field.) Applicants from Australia, Canada (except Quebec), Ireland, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom are exempt from the language proficiency exam. In addition to these national requirements, most States have their own requirements.

For the source and more detailed information concerning your request, click on the related links section indicated below.

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Obstetricians
Obstetrics & Gynecology

What is the use of sterodin injection course?

To increase ur immunity.

151617
Job Training and Career Qualifications
Bachelors Degrees
Obstetrics & Gynecology

How many years of school do you need to become an obstetrics nurse?

There are three options to become a registered nurse as follows.

  • diploma program (typically three years, not recommended for individuals who do not have an already existing degree)
  • associate degree (two years as a full-time student once the student starts the professional phase of the program)
  • bachelor's degree (BSN) (four years as a full-time student)

For the source and more detailed information concerning your request, click on the related links section (U.S. Department of Labor) indicated at the bottom of this answer box.

There are three options to become a registered nurse as follows.

  • diploma program (typically three years, not recommended for individuals who do not have an already existing degree)
  • associate degree (two years as a full-time student once the student starts the professional phase of the program)
  • bachelor's degree (BSN) (four years as a full-time student)

For the source and more detailed information concerning your request, click on the related links section (U.S. Department of Labor) indicated at the bottom of this answer box.

There are three options to become a registered nurse as follows.

  • diploma program (typically three years, not recommended for individuals who do not have an already existing degree)
  • associate degree (two years as a full-time student once the student starts the professional phase of the program)
  • bachelor's degree (BSN) (four years as a full-time student)

For the source and more detailed information concerning your request, click on the related links section (U.S. Department of Labor) indicated at the bottom of this answer box.

There are three options to become a registered nurse as follows.

  • diploma program (typically three years, not recommended for individuals who do not have an already existing degree)
  • associate degree (two years as a full-time student once the student starts the professional phase of the program)
  • bachelor's degree (BSN) (four years as a full-time student)

For the source and more detailed information concerning your request, click on the related links section (U.S. Department of Labor) indicated at the bottom of this answer box.

There are three options to become a registered nurse as follows.

  • diploma program (typically three years, not recommended for individuals who do not have an already existing degree)
  • associate degree (two years as a full-time student once the student starts the professional phase of the program)
  • bachelor's degree (BSN) (four years as a full-time student)

For the source and more detailed information concerning your request, click on the related links section (U.S. Department of Labor) indicated at the bottom of this answer box.

There are three options to become a registered nurse as follows.

  • diploma program (typically three years, not recommended for individuals who do not have an already existing degree)
  • associate degree (two years as a full-time student once the student starts the professional phase of the program)
  • bachelor's degree (BSN) (four years as a full-time student)

For the source and more detailed information concerning your request, click on the related links section (U.S. Department of Labor) indicated at the bottom of this answer box.

345
Job Training and Career Qualifications
Salary and Pay Rates
Bachelors Degrees
Obstetrics & Gynecology

How long do you have to go to school to specialize in obstetrics nursing?

There are three options to become a registered nurse as follows.

  • diploma program (typically three years, not recommended for individuals who do not have an already existing degree)
  • associate degree (two years as a full-time student once the student starts the professional phase of the program)
  • bachelor's degree (BSN) (four years as a full-time student)

For the source and more detailed information concerning your request, click on the related links section (U.S. Department of Labor) indicated at the bottom of this answer box.

There are three options to become a registered nurse as follows.

  • diploma program (typically three years, not recommended for individuals who do not have an already existing degree)
  • associate degree (two years as a full-time student once the student starts the professional phase of the program)
  • bachelor's degree (BSN) (four years as a full-time student)

For the source and more detailed information concerning your request, click on the related links section (U.S. Department of Labor) indicated at the bottom of this answer box.

There are three options to become a registered nurse as follows.

  • diploma program (typically three years, not recommended for individuals who do not have an already existing degree)
  • associate degree (two years as a full-time student once the student starts the professional phase of the program)
  • bachelor's degree (BSN) (four years as a full-time student)

For the source and more detailed information concerning your request, click on the related links section (U.S. Department of Labor) indicated at the bottom of this answer box.

There are three options to become a registered nurse as follows.

  • diploma program (typically three years, not recommended for individuals who do not have an already existing degree)
  • associate degree (two years as a full-time student once the student starts the professional phase of the program)
  • bachelor's degree (BSN) (four years as a full-time student)

For the source and more detailed information concerning your request, click on the related links section (U.S. Department of Labor) indicated at the bottom of this answer box.

There are three options to become a registered nurse as follows.

  • diploma program (typically three years, not recommended for individuals who do not have an already existing degree)
  • associate degree (two years as a full-time student once the student starts the professional phase of the program)
  • bachelor's degree (BSN) (four years as a full-time student)

For the source and more detailed information concerning your request, click on the related links section (U.S. Department of Labor) indicated at the bottom of this answer box.

There are three options to become a registered nurse as follows.

  • diploma program (typically three years, not recommended for individuals who do not have an already existing degree)
  • associate degree (two years as a full-time student once the student starts the professional phase of the program)
  • bachelor's degree (BSN) (four years as a full-time student)

For the source and more detailed information concerning your request, click on the related links section (U.S. Department of Labor) indicated at the bottom of this answer box.

345
Acronyms & Abbreviations
Doctors
Obstetrics & Gynecology

What does DO after a doctor's name mean?

What do the initials D.O. stand for after a medical physician's name?

It stands for Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine.

232425
Obstetricians
Obstetrics & Gynecology

What is the coding for obstetrics including items covered by the global fee for antepartum and postpartum periods of normal pregnancy?

One of the unusual aspects of OB is the global fee that encompasses the antepartum, delivery, and postpartum period of normal pregnancy. The initial blood history, physical examination, blood pressure, weight, fetal heart tones, routine analysis, and monthly visits up to twenty-eight weeks gestation, biweekly visits, thirty-six weeks gestation, and weekly visits until delivery are all included in antepartum care. Delivery services should include hospital admission with history and physical, the management of uncomplicated labor, and the vaginal pr cesarean delivery. Episiotomy and use of forceps are also included. Any medical complications should be coded separately. Normal, uncomplicated and hospital and office visits for six weeks following vaginal or cesarean section delivery are included in postpartum care. It is not unusual for a patient to have more than one physician to provide complete obstetrics care due to extended length of care of the OB patient. If a physician provides part or all of the antepartum and postpartum care, but does not perform delivery due to referral to another physician or termination of pregnancy by abortion, the antepartum and postpartum care CPT coded 59409-59410 and 59414-59430 should be used.

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Obstetricians
Obstetrics & Gynecology

What is a regular day for an Obstetrics and Gynaecology?

Obstetricians and gynecologists. Obstetricians and gynecologists (ob/gyns) are specialists whose focus is women's health. They are responsible for general medical care for women, but also provide care related to pregnancy and the reproductive system. Like general practitioners, ob/gyns are concerned with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of general health problems, but they focus on ailments specific to the female anatomy, such as breast and cervical cancer, urinary tract and pelvic disorders, and hormonal disorders. Ob/gyns also specialize in childbirth, treating and counseling women throughout their pregnancy, from giving prenatal diagnoses to delivery and postpartum care. Ob/gyns track the health of, and treat, both mother and fetus as the pregnancy progresses.

Many physicians-primarily general and family practitioners, general internists, pediatricians, ob/gyns, and psychiatrists-work in small private offices or clinics, often assisted by a small staff of nurses and other administrative personnel. Increasingly, physicians are practicing in groups or health care organizations that provide backup coverage and allow for more time off. These physicians often work as part of a team coordinating care for a population of patients; they are less independent than solo practitioners of the past. Surgeons and anesthesiologists typically work in well-lighted, sterile environments while performing surgery and often stand for long periods. Most work in hospitals or in surgical outpatient centers. Many physicians and surgeons work long, irregular hours. Over one-third of full-time physicians and surgeons worked 60 hours or more a week in 2004. Only 8 percent of all physicians and surgeons worked part-time, compared with 16 percent for all occupations. Physicians and surgeons must travel frequently between office and hospital to care for their patients. Those who are on call deal with many patients' concerns over the phone and may make emergency visits to hospitals or nursing homes.

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Obstetrics & Gynecology

What universities in Florida offer a degree in gynecology?

Gynecology is type of advanced, special training for doctors not a college major or type of degree. Doctors, after they complete medical school and other more generalized training, can choose to train further to become a "specialist" in areas such as pediatrics, radiology, oncology, etc.. Gynecology is one of these specialized areas of advanced training for doctors.

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