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Mormon Trail

The Mormon Trail was traveled by the Mormon Pioneers between 1845 and 1870. It greatly contributed to the westward expansion and played a large role in forming the western United States. Questions in this category relate to the Mormon Trail and the Mormon Pioneers.
This is only my opinion, but I think that we were!
They took whatever they could carry, which wasn't much. For a long time, they ate flour mixed with water (cooked). They ate what they could hunt as well... but most of the time, they didn't eat much, which is why many died.
the people who walked it walked from Missouri to Utah, because they believed they're church was and still is the true church on the earth. they left Missouri because of the persicution, tar and feathering, buring houses, and much more horrible stuff. be thankful for fast transportation and a good...
The Mormon Trail cloesly followed the Oregon and California trails much of the time. This is because there really was only one easy way to the west, due to the placement of mountains, rivers, and settlements used for gathering supplies.
  From 1846 to 1869   From 1846 to 1869
Obviously it's because the Mormons traveled the trail.
there were hundreds of thousands of people on the Mormon trail, a lot of which were my ancestors. some of the most famous Mormons were Jospeh Smith, Brigham Young, and Emma Smith.
The Mormon Trail was the route, but it did travel on the Oregon trial too. :)
The Mormons (the members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints) believed that they could escape persecution by moving west. They were forced out of Illinois and Missouri and finally went all the way to Utah, where they built their temple and practiced their religion in safety.
It probably depends on the family and on when they were travelling. The first pioneers carried everything with them, including what tools they would need to establish farms and homes when they reached Salt Lake City. Later pioneers did not need to carry all of these things as the city was already...
Buffalo, deer, antelope, rabbit, coyote, wolf, beer, cougar, prairie dog, wolverine, badger, muskrat, beaver, etc.
Yes. When it was possible, the Mormon trail was on the opposite side of the river from the Oregon and California trails, to avoid any confrontation or argument over use of the trail and supplies (grass, berries, small game) found along the trail.
It was a difficult trek, and many died along the trail.
The Mormon Pioneer Trail is a 1,300-mile travelled by members ofThe Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from 1846 to 1868.The Mormon Trail extends from Nauvoo, Illinois on the Mississipiriver, passing through Iowa, Nebraska, Wyoming, and Eastern Utah toSalt Lake City, Utah. The Mormon...
The Mormon trail is the trail the Mormon pioneers took to have a better life.
The Mormon Trail was traveled by Mormon Pioneers from Illinois to Utah after they had been kicked out of Illinois. It was then traveled by Mormon converts from Europe and Canada as they immigrated to "Zion" (the Mormon settlements in Utah). The trail was mostly discontinued after the railroad...
all the kinds that live in between Missouri and Utah, rattlesnakes, buffalo, and all them other peeps.
Most of the people that died on the "Mormon Trail" as they call it now days just left late and winter started to come and many died of frostbite/Hypothermia.
A Google search suggests it was a nonprofit company called Mormon Trail Wagon Train-150 Years, Inc., in partnership with the Utah Crossroads Chapter of the Oregon-California Trails Association, the Utah State Office of Education, BYU Public School Partnership, Heritage Gateways Ltd., and the Mormon...
No, he didn't. Although the he called himself a prophet Joseph  Smith prophesied the Church would eventually have to move to the  Rocky Mountains to find peace, he was murdered before the move was  carried out. The murder was directly tied to his claim that God  condoned polygamy. Brigham Young...
On horse, on foot, in a wagon or pulling a handcart.
The Mormon Pioneer Trail is a 1,300-mile travelled by members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from 1846 to 1868. The Mormon Trail extends from Nauvoo, Illinois on the Mississipi river, passing through Iowa, Nebraska, Wyoming, and Eastern Utah to Salt Lake City, Utah.The Mormon...
The mormon trail was important because it was one of the largest mass migrations in US History. It stretched from a previously large city named Nauvoo in Illinios and ended in the Great Salt Lake basin in modern day Utah. It also saved the mormon faith. If the mormons had stayed in Nauvoo, they may...
The Mormon Trail, Oregon Trail, California Trail, etc all followed nearly the same route because it was one of the only ways to get across the country. These trails all crossed major rivers at their smaller places, and all crossed mountain ranges in their mildest places. Groups traveling in covered...
This depends on how many were in your group and how you were traveling. A single rider on a horse could probably complete the trip in just over a week, while a large wagon or handcart group would take two or three months to complete the journey.
Because it was the trail that lead to Salt Lake City. The Oregon trail went to Oregon, the California trail went to California, and the Mormon Trail went to Utah.
The Mormon Trail began in Nauvoo, Illinois and ended in Salt Lake City Utah.first of all where it began is correct and by the way it never ended i am a mormon but we do not put mormons as are church name we are know as the church of latterday saints
A lot of salted meats, to keep them preserved, I know. I'm thinking there was a lot of fried flour and nuts as well. Grains kept well, and were widely popular... as well as beans.
Problems were illness, starvation, attacks, lack of water, Heat, Cold, and many other things that are not known to me at this time.
The Mormons moved west in search of a place where they could practice their religion in peace. The church was founded in upstate New York in 1830, but over the first 15 years moved from New York to Ohio to Missouri to Illinois in search of peace and acceptance. In each place, they were hated,...
The Mormon Pioneer Trail is a 1,300-mile travelled by members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from 1846 to 1868. The Mormon Trail extends from Nauvoo, Illinois on the Mississipi river, passing through Iowa, Nebraska, Wyoming, and Eastern Utah to Salt Lake City, Utah. The Mormon...
Mormon Pioneer National Historic Trail covers nearly 100 miles in Utah, and about 1300 miles total. From the trail's end in Salt Lake City to Washington D.C. is a 2100 mile drive, so from where the trail enters Utah at the border of Wyoming it is a 2000 mile drive.
Assuming you mean what WERE the LDS pioneers' legacy, a short  answer would be they walked thousands of miles to Utah so they  could avoid persecution (at one point it was LEGAL in Illinois to  kill a Mormon). The pioneers simply wanted a place to worship the  Lord in peace. My concise...
Most of the pioneer handcart companies took about 3 months to travel the trail from the Midwest to Utah. Many who used handcarts came from Europe and had already been traveling for a month or so, as they had to take a boat across the ocean to the east coast and then travel by train to their...
There were many stops along the Mormon Trail. Here's a link with a picture en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Mormon_Trail_3.png, but the most important were Council Bluffs and Winter Quarters. They were the most important and where many sad and terrible things happened on the Mormon Trail. Also, visit; lds...
Rocky Mountains and Wasatch Mountains.
The trail followed by Mormon pioneers mostly paralleled the Oregon Trail, at times merged with it, and at a few points diverged completely from it. The reason for following the general course of the Oregon trail was primarily because it had been mapped out by traders and trappers several years prior...
They traveled with either covered wagons (wagons with a semicircle frame on the top and covered by canvas material) or by handcart.
Pioneers on the Mormon Trail ate the same sorts of foods you would find on all pioneer trails at the time. Common provisions included flour, corn meal, potatoes, onions, apples, and dried meats. Most companies would take along some cows, chickens, or pigs to provide food along the way, and hunted...
In the 1800s, Members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints were being heavily prosecuted where they lived in Nauvoo, IL. Recently, Their religious leader, Joseph Smith Jr, was murdured by a mob of people who did not share the same beliefs. After much prayer, the new religious leader,...
Yes, I can. I was bitter cold in the winter and very hot in the summer, it would be very muddy when it rained and dry and dusty if it didn't. In most areas there was little vegetation. Some areas were very flat, some had rolling hills, and others were steep, rocky mountains. There were a few...
they traveled in convoys of horses and wagons through the smoothest terrain
The Mormon Pioneer Trail is a 1,300-mile travelled by members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from 1846 to 1868. The Mormon Trail extends from Nauvoo, Illinois on the Mississipi river, passing through Iowa, Nebraska, Wyoming, and Eastern Utah to Salt Lake City, Utah.The Mormon...
The main wildlife would be deer, bear, antelope, buffalo, cougar, prairie dog, chipmunk, squirrel, badger, muskrat, etc.
The Mormon trail was important in several ways. First of all, the faith of those who had to endure the hardships was strengthened to the point where their trust in God and the truthfulness of their religion was solidified and they were able to become great leaders of the church. The Mormon trail...
Depends on the day. Some days they didn't travel at all, and others they traveled up to 25 miles. It depended on weather, terrain, rations, season, the size of the group, and wether they were using handcarts or wagons. Also, they typically didn't travel on Sunday snd would take breaks if someone was...
Evening dances were very popular on the Mormon trail. They would gather around bonfires to play instruments, sing, dance, and talk. Children would play games or make simple toys with sticks, rocks, and strings.
To put it bluntly, tough. The Mormons had to walk all the way to Utah from the eastern states. That involve crossing rivers (half the time they were deep and/or icy) suffering from cold and starvation during the winter time, and a lot more. Try watching a documentary or two about the Mormon Trail.
The Mormon trail originally began in Nauvoo Illinois, near the Mississippi River, but it later covered all of the United States as more and more people used it to travel west.
What did Mormons bring on the trail? Well, provisions, their belongings. Of course they brought a lot of food, Jerky and bags of flour and such. Most of the time, they even brought their furniture in which they had to throw out of the wagon and leave behind later on their way.
People walking along the same path.
Walking 2,000 miles over wild, mountainous terrain with very little food and carrying all your belongings... you can do the math. :)
The Mormons, the religious group that made and traveled the trail.
The Mormon Trail stopped being used shortly after the railroad reached Utah in 1869.
Oregon Trail & California Trail.
Well Mormon is good if you want a shorter trail and wanted to go to Utah but Santa Fe was good if you were going to look for gold.
The first group of Mormon pioneers started on the trail in the winter of 1845-46, but groups continued to use the trail until the railroad came in 1869.many of these groups were converts from Europe.
Iowa, Nebraska, Wyoming , and Utah.
The Mormon Trail had several starting pionts, but the original group traveling from Nauvoo, Illionios to Utah travelled over 1,300 miles.
The physical features on the Mormon trail was that of total nature. Lots of brush, trees, wild flowers (depending on the time of year) there were rocks, hills, wholes on the ground the people had to walk across. In the winter in was freezing snow and rain and many died from hunger and weather...
Members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (commonly called the "Mormon" church) traveled west on the Mormon Trail to find a place where they could practice their religion in peace.
Omaha, Nebraska Laramie, Wyoming
Although the first Mormons to travel the trail were leaving Nauvoo, Illinois, the actual start of the trail is officially in Iowa. From there it passes through Nebraska and Wyoming before ending in Utah.
Entry - July 27, 1847 "Some Ute Indians visited the Pioneer Camp." This was in the Salt Lake City area. (LDS Church Chronology 1805 -1914, page 34)
Nauvoo, Illlinois is the start of the Mormon Trail.
The Mormon trail started at Nauvoo, Illinois and crossed Iowa to Winter Quarters, Nebraska and ended at Salt Lake City, Utah. Therefore the trail passed through only 3 states and that was Iowa, Nebraska & Wyoming.
The Mormon Trail ended in the Salt Lake Valley in Utah. They built a city, and it later became known as Salt Lake City.
Not too difficult. The wagons crossed at shallow places and they used ferry's to cross deeper waters.
The Mormon Trail was used by a people seeking religious freedom rather than wealth and prosperity, as most other trails were.
All sorts of things! Injuries, infections, illnesses, old age, starvation, fatigue, and freezing.
The Mormon Trail was a transcontinental trail that lead from the eastern states to Utah. It did nothing in bringing Utah Territory into the United States, aside from enabling the population to grow large enough for the territory to become a state. In fact, the trail ended almost 30 years before Utah...
The Mormon trail was used between 1845 and 1869, when the transcontinental railroad was completed and therefore the trail was no longer needed.
The first Mormon Pioneer group took 2 years to cross the Mormon trail... this is mostly because there wasn't yet a trail and they didn't really know exactly where they were going. Later groups took several weeks to several months, depending on the number of people, weather, and mode of...
The Mormon Pioneer Trail is a 1,300-mile travelled by members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from 1846 to 1868. The Mormon Trail extends from Nauvoo, Illinois on the Mississipi river, passing through Iowa, Nebraska, Wyoming, and Eastern Utah to Salt Lake City, Utah.The Mormon...
The Mormon Pioneer Trail is a 1,300-mile travelled by members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from 1846 to 1868. The Mormon Trail extends from Nauvoo, Illinois on the Mississipi river, passing through Iowa, Nebraska, Wyoming, and Eastern Utah to Salt Lake City, Utah.The Mormon...
No. This is a very confusing question because of the terms that you use, i.e. 'Buffalo Soldiers' & 'Mormon' 'Trail of Tears', but after you break it down, it isn't confusing, just different dates. When the 'Buffalo Soldiers' were organized in 1866 the 'transcontinental railroad' was well on its...
This question is a two part question that has no answer. The Mormon Trail is commonly known as the trek westward from the state of Illinois to the (now state) of Utah which began in 1846. The Prophet Joseph Smith was assassinated prior to the trek westward in 1844. Therefore Joseph Smith never...
The Mormon trail passes through the Great Plains and the Rocky Mountains.
Answer Started in Nauvoo Illinois. Ended in the Salt Lake Valley. The previous answer leaves far too much of the story omitted. Joseph Smith Jr. (1805-1844) organized the Church of Christ on April 6, 1830 in Fayette, New York (located in the Finger Lakes Region). After persecution persisted and...
The Mormon Trail started in February 1846.
The Mormon Trail didn't change the American West, because the Mormon Trail was next to the Oregon Trail. Another answer:The Mormon Trail followed the Oregon Trail until it hit Fort Bridger, Wyoming. There the Mormon Trail split off down toward where Salt Lake City, Utah is today. The largest change...
They had been kicked out of other places they tried to settle, so they moved to a land that was mostly uninhabited so that they could practice their religion in peace.
The trail was actually created by explorers and fur trappers much earlier, it was named the Mormon trail after the Mormons began using it, although it was the same trail as the Oregon trail and various other western trails until it split at Fort Bridger to go into Utah. At Fort Bridger they took the...
The knew what everyone else knew -- that is, virtually nothing. What little they did know was based on reports by a handful of scouts and explorers who had been to parts of the western continent before 1846.
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