Ford Expedition

The Ford Expedition is a five-door, full-size SUV manufactured and marketed by Ford Motor Company. Introduced in 1997 as a replacement to the Ford Bronco, Ford Expedition is the largest and the last variant of off-road, truck-based Ford SUV.

7,141 Questions
Steering and Suspension
Shocks and Struts
Ford Expedition
Dog Health

Why would the suspension lean to one side?

The same air pressure is applied to both air bags so they should lift the same amount, however when the weight in the car is removed and the ride height is too high, the control unit opens the solenoids to vent some air. If the control unit only sends the vent signal to one solenoid or the wiring to one of the solenoids is bad, then only one would vent so the other side would stay high. Check wiring and connecters. If the air system is ok, it will still lean if of the car is heavier on one side or if one of the front springs is weak or broken. These are just guesses and I am assuming the limo is the same the cars I am familiar with. .

If the car does not have "air ride", Look for a broken spring, low tire pressure or a bad strut.

A broken Leaf spring would cause it to lean to one side.

ANSWER

Depending on what type of suspension you have (torsion bars, coil springs, solid axle,leaf spring, etc. It could be a worn spring( leaf or coil), broken torsion bar, or a broken steering knuckle .

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Ford Expedition
Ford Expedition Eddie Bauer

How much will a 2006 ford expedition tune up cost?

200

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Brake Pads and Rotors
Ford Expedition
Ford Expedition XLT

To remove a rotor from a 1999 Ford Expedition?

Removing Front & Rear Rotors Well Guys...

I remove my Front & Rear Rotors out of my 1998 Ford Expedition XLT.

I rented a 3 Jaw Puller from Auto Zone and a bottle of PB Blaster and a sledge hammer it only took about one hour or less to take both off...

The way I removed the Front & Rear Rotors was ...

1. I put lots of PB Blaster in the back and the front of the rotors to be removed.

2. I put plenty of tension with the 3 Jaw Puller...

3. I hit the back of the rotor with the sledge hammer...

And it came right off...

Hope this helps...

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Ford Focus
Ford Expedition
Ford F-150

How do you remove the ignition switch from a Ford Focus?

Follow this link to see a step-by-step, illustrated article written by a Ford Master Tech. http://www.motorage.com/motorage/data/articlestandard/motorage/472002/38913/article.pdf I followed the procedure and now have to replace the I.C. (Ignition Cylinder) using the 2nd link: http://www.techtrainproductions.com/bulletin/ttb_16.pdf For comiseration and to see the extent of the problem go to this USERNET link: http://www.focusfanatics.com/forum/showthread.php?s=3c41a7b525a8dddec964c6042eafed6d&threadid=51332&highlight=ignition+key Good picking :) S. J. Medley, steve(deletethis part)medley@sbcglobal.net

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Ford Expedition
Ford Expedition Eddie Bauer
Ford Expedition XLT

Why won't a Ford Expedition XLT start?

My neighbor had this problem. He went to the trouble of randomly replacing the starter. It did not work. He had it towed to his mechanic who said the car had a secondary solenoid that had gone bad. If you don't have votage at the starter motor, and the fuses are all ok, you might check the secondary solenoid. _______________________________________________________ Diagnosis: Engine Won't Start or Run By Larry Carley c2007

WHEN AN ENGINE WON'T START Every engine requires four basic ingredients to start: sufficient cranking speed, good compression, adequate ignition voltage (with correct timing) and fuel (a relatively rich air/fuel mixture initially). So any time an engine fails to start, you can assume it lacks one of these four essential ingredients. But which one? To find you, you need to analyze the situation. If the engine won't crank, you are probably dealing with a starter or battery problem. Has the starter been acting up? (Unusual noises slow cranking, etc.). Is this the first time the engine has failed to crank or start, or has it happened before? Have the starter, battery or battery cables been replaced recently? Might be a defective part. Has the battery been running down? Might be a charging problem. Have there been any other electrical problems? The answers to these questions should shed some light on what might be causing the problem. If an engine cranks but refuses to start, it lacks ignition, fuel or compression. Was it running fine but quit suddenly? The most likely causes here would be a failed fuel pump, ignition module or broken overhead cam timing belt. Has the engine been getting progressively harder to start? If yes, consider the engine's maintenance and repair history. STARTING YOUR DIAGNOSIS What happens when you attempt to start the engine? If nothing happens when you turn the key, check the battery to determine its state of charge. Many starters won't do a thing unless there is at least 10 volts available from the battery. A low battery does not necessarily mean the battery is the problem, though. The battery may have been run down by prolonged cranking while trying to start the engine. Or, the battery's low state of charge may be the result of a charging system problem. Either way, the battery needs to be recharged and tested. If the battery is low, the next logical step might be to try starting the engine with another battery or a charger. If the engine cranks normally and roars to life, you can assume the problem was a dead battery, or a charging problem that allowed the battery to run down. If the battery accepts a charge and tests okay, checking the output of the charging system should help you identify any problems there. A charging system that is working properly should produce a charging voltage of somewhere around 14 volts at idle with the lights and accessories off. When the engine is first started, the charging voltage should rise quickly to about two volts above base battery voltage, then taper off, leveling out at the specified voltage. The exact charging voltage will vary according to the battery's state of charge, the load on the electrical system, and temperature. The lower the temperature, the higher the charging voltage. The higher the temperature, the lower the charging voltage. The charging range for a typical alternator might be 13.9 to 14.4 volts at 80 degrees F, but increase to 14.9 to 15.8 volts at subzero temperatures. If the charging system is not putting out the required voltage, is it the alternator or the regulator? Full fielding the alternator to bypass the regulator should tell you if it is working correctly. Or, take the alternator to a parts store and have it bench tested. If the charging voltage goes up when the regulator is bypassed, the problem is the regulator (or the engine computer in the case of computer-regulated systems). If there is no change in output voltage, the alternator is the culprit. Many times one or more diodes in the alternator rectifier assembly will have failed, causing a drop in the unit's output. The alternator will still produce current, but not enough to keep the battery fully charged. This type of failure will show up on an oscilloscope as one or more missing humps in the alternator waveform. Most charging system analyzers can detect this type of problem. ENGINE CRANKING PROBLEMS If the engine won't crank or cranks slowly when you attempt to start or jump start the engine (and the battery is fully charged), you can focus your attention on the starter circuit. A quick way to diagnose cranking problems is to switch on the headlights and watch what happens when you attempt to start the engine. If the headlights go out, a poor battery cable connection may be strangling the flow of amps. All battery cable connections should be checked and cleaned along with the engine-to-chassis ground straps. Measuring the voltage drop across connections is a good way to find excessive resistance. A voltmeter check of the cable connections should show no more than 0.1 volt drop at any point, and no more than 0.4 volts for the entire starter circuit. A higher voltage drop would indicate excessive resistance and a need for cleaning or tightening. Slow cranking can also be caused by undersized battery cables. Some cheap replacement cables have small gauge wire encased in thick insulation. The cables look the same size as the originals on the outside, but inside there is not enough wire to handle the amps. If the headlights continue to shine brightly when you attempt to start the engine and nothing happens (no cranking), voltage is not reaching the starter. The problem here is likely an open or misadjusted park/neutral safety switch, a bad ignition switch, or a faulty starter relay or solenoid. Fuses and fusible links should also be checked because overloads caused by continuous cranking or jump starting may have blown one of these protective devices. If the starter or solenoid clicks but nothing else happens when you attempt to start the engine, there may not be enough amps to spin the starter. Or the starter may be bad. A poor battery cable, solenoid or ground connection, or high resistance in the solenoid itself may be the problem. A voltage check at the solenoid will reveal if battery voltage is passing through the ignition switch circuit. If the solenoid or relay is receiving battery voltage but is not closing or passing enough amps from the battery to spin the starter motor, the solenoid ground may be bad or the contacts in the solenoid may be worn, pitted or corroded. If the starter cranks when the solenoid is bypassed, a new solenoid is needed, not a starter. Most engines need a cranking speed of 200 to 300 rpm to start, so if the starter is weak and can't crank the engine fast enough to build compression, the engine won't start. In some instances, a weak starter may crank the engine fast enough but prevent it from starting because it draws all the power from the battery and does not leave enough for the injectors or ignition system. If the lights dim and there is little or no cranking when you attempt to start the engine, the starter may be locked up, dragging or suffering from high internal resistance, worn brushes, shorts or opens in the windings or armature. A starter current draw test will tell you if the starter is pulling too many amps. A good starter will normally draw 60 to 150 amps with no load on it, and up to 200 amps or more while cranking the engine. The no load amp draw depends on the rating of the starter while the cranking amp draw depends on the displacement and compression of the engine. Always refer to the OEM specs for the exact amp values. Some "high torque" GM starters, for example, may have a no load draw of up to 250 amps. Toyota starters on four-cylinder engines typically draw 130 to 150 amps, and up to 175 amps on six-cylinder engines. An unusually high current draw and low free turning speed or cranking speed typically indicates a shorted armature, grounded armature or field coils, or excessive friction within the starter itself (dirty, worn or binding bearings or bushings, a bent armature shaft or contact between the armature and field coils). The magnets in permanent magnet starters can sometimes break or separate from the housing and drag against the armature. A starter that does not turn at all and draws a high current may have a ground in the terminal or field coils, or a frozen armature. On the other hand, the start may be fine but can't crank the engine because the engine is seized or hydrolocked. So before you condemn the starter, try turning the engine over by hand. Won't budge? Then the engine is probably locked up. A starter that won't spin at all and draws zero amps has an open field circuit, open armature coils, defective brushes or a defective solenoid. Low free turning speed combined with a low current draw indicates high internal resistance (bad connections, bad brushes, open field coils or armature windings). If the starter motor spins but fails to engage the flywheel, the cause may be a weak solenoid, defective starter drive or broken teeth on the flywheel. A starter drive that is on the verge of failure may engage briefly but then slip. Pull the starter and inspect the drive. It should turn freely in one direction but not in the other. A bad drive will turn freely in both directions or not at all. ENGINE CRANKS BUT WILL NOT START When the engine cranks normally but won't start, you need to check ignition, fuel and compression. Ignition is easy enough to check with a spark tester or by positioning a plug wire near a good ground. No spark? The most likely causes would be a failed ignition module, distributor pickup or crank position (CKP) sensors A tool such as an Ignition System Simulator can speed the diagnosis by quickly telling you if the ignition module and coil are capable of producing a spark with a simulated timing input signal. If the simulated signal generates a spark, the problem is a bad distributor pickup or crankshaft position sensor. No spark would point to a bad module or coil. Measuring ignition coil primary and secondary resistance can rule out that component as the culprit. Module problems as well as pickup problems are often caused by loose, broken or corroded wiring terminals and connectors. Older GM HEI ignition modules are notorious for this. If you are working on a distributorless ignition system with a Hall effect crankshaft position sensor, check the sensor's reference voltage (VRef) and ground. The sensor must have 5 volts or it will remain permanently off and not generate a crank signal (which should set a fault code). Measure VRef between the sensor power supply wire and ground (use the engine block for a ground, not the sensor ground circuit wire). Don't see 5 volts? Then check the sensor wiring harness for loose or corroded connectors. A poor ground connection will have the same effect on the sensor operation as a bad VRef supply. Measure the voltage drop between the sensor ground wire and the engine block. More than a 0.1 voltage drop indicates a bad ground connection. Check the sensor mounting and wiring harness. If a Hall effect crank sensor has power and ground, the next thing to check would be its output. With nothing in the sensor window, the sensor should be "on" and read 5 volts (VRef). Measure the sensor D.C. output voltage between the sensor signal output wire and ground (use the engine block again, not the ground wire). When the engine is cranked, the sensor output should drop to zero every time the shutter blade, notch, magnetic button or gear tooth passes through the sensor. No change in voltage would indicate a bad sensor that needs to be replaced. If the primary side of the ignition system seems to be producing a trigger signal for the coil but the voltage is not reaching the plugs, a visual inspection of the coil tower, distributor cap, rotor and plug wires should be made to identify any defects that might be preventing the spark from reaching its intended destination. ENGINE CRANKS AND HAS SPARK BUT WILL NOT START If you see a good hot spark when you crank the engine, but it won't start, check for fuel. The problem might be a bad fuel pump On an older engine with a carburetor, pump the throttle linkage and look for fuel squirting into the carburetor throat. No fuel? Possible causes include a bad mechanical fuel pump, stuck needle valve in the carburetor, a plugged fuel line or fuel filter. On newer vehicles with electronic fuel injection, connect a pressure gauge to the fuel rail to see if there is any pressure in the line. No pressure when the key is on? Check for a failed fuel pump, pump relay, fuse or wiring problem. On Fords, don't forget to check the inertia safety switch which is usually hidden in the trunk or under a rear kick panel. The switch shuts off the fuel pump in an accident. So if the switch has been tripped, resetting it should restore the flow of fuel to the engine. Lack of fuel can also be caused by obstructions in the fuel line or pickup sock inside the tank. And don't forget to check the fuel gauge. It is amazing how many no starts are caused by an empty fuel tank. There is also the possibility that the fuel in the tank may be heavily contaminated with water or overloaded with alcohol. If the tank was just filled, bad gas might be causing the problem. On EFI-equipped engines, fuel pressure in the line does not necessarily mean the fuel is being injected into the engine. Listen for clicking or buzzing that would indicate the injectors are working. No noise? Check for voltage and ground at the injectors. A defective ECM may not be driving the injectors, or the EFI power supply relay may have called it quits. Some EFI-systems rely on input from the camshaft position sensor to generate the injector pulses. Loss of this signal could prevent the system from functioning. Even if there is fuel and it is being delivered to the engine, a massive vacuum leak could be preventing the engine from starting. A large enough vacuum leak will lean out the air/fuel ratio to such an extent that the mixture won't ignite. An EGR valve that is stuck wide open, a disconnected PCV hose, loose vacuum hose for the power brake booster, or similar leak could be the culprit. Check all vacuum connections and listen for unusual sucking noises while cranking. ENGINE HAS FUEL AND SPARK BUT WILL NOT START An engine that has fuel and spark, no serious vacuum leaks and cranks normally should start. The problem is compression. If it is an overhead cam engine with a rubber timing belt, a broken timing belt would be the most likely cause especially if the engine has a lot of miles on it. Most OEMs recommend replacing the OHC timing belt every 60,000 miles for preventative maintenance, but many belts are never changed. Eventually they break, and when they do the engine stops dead in its tracks. And in engines that lack sufficient valve-to-piston clearance as many import engines and some domestic engines do, it also causes extensive damage (bent valves and valvetrain components & sometimes cracked pistons). Overhead cams can also bind and break if the head warps due to severe overheating, or the cam bearings are starved for lubrication. A cam seizure may occur during a subzero cold start if the oil in the crankcase is too thick and is slow to reach the cam (a good reason for using 5W-20 or 5W-30 for winter driving). High rpm cam failure can occur if the oil level is low or the oil is long overdue for a change. With high mileage pushrod engines, the timing chain may have broken or slipped. Either type of problem can be diagnosed by doing a compression check and/or removing a valve cover and watching for valve movement when the engine is cranked. A blown head gasket may prevent an engine from starting if the engine is a four cylinder with two dead cylinders. But most six or eight cylinder engines will sputter to life and run roughly even with a blown gasket. The gasket can, however, allow coolant to leak into the cylinder and hydrolock the engine.

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Ford Expedition
Ford Expedition Eddie Bauer

1998 Ford Expedition trembles what causes this?

Fear???????

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Alternators
Chevy S-10
Ford Expedition

How do you test an alternator while still mounted to the engine without using a meter?

NEVER EVER disconnect a battery cable while the engine is running. The surge will fry your computer.Here's a link to the proper way to test:

http://www.ricksfreeautorepairadvice.com/repair-topics/alternator-generator/testing-an-alternator-without-blowing-it-sky-high

Check with your local auto parts store. Most can check the voltage on the car.

You can also start the motor, while it's running remove neg battery terminal if motor stays runnung your alternator is good.

This technique is best done at night/in the dark. Turn headlights on whilst engine is running. If idle is set correctly, when you press gas pedal you should notice the headlights/dash lights become brighter. If they become brighter your alternator is working.

Another check you can do at night is to observe the headlights with the engine running, then shut off the engine. The headlights should get slightly dimmer. If not then the alternator ( and connections) should be checked further

While the engine is running you can take the positive off of the battery terminal. If the car stalls, it's a good bet your alternator is shot.

re-distribution of electrons is toughMost of these answers don't distinguish between a bad alternator and a bad voltage regulator, the symptoms are often the same. Voltage regulators are cheap and usually easy to replace, depending upon how deep the alternator is buried. Then again a voltmeter only costs a few bucks from harbor freight or radio shack.

Like the drunk searching for his keys under the light pole, (the light is better here) diagnosing electrical problems is best done with the easiest/cheapest jobs done first: Checking voltage drop through connectors and harnesses, Cleaning terminals (especially those on the alternator and main fuse panel), Replacing the voltage regulator, Having the battery and alternator inspected (usually free) by an auto parts chain store, etc..

Your alternator might also be ok but but marginally underpowered for the equipment in the car. This'll happen a lot to cars that are loaded down with aftermarket audio and lighting gear. I'm looking at a weird case like this right now, whenever the AC is on, and I'm just puttering around town, the battery starts sagging down under 12 volts. Since I've little aftermarket stuff in the car, I suspect that either the AC clutch or the aux fan is pulling way more current than it should.

My choices seem to be to put a bigger alternator in, or to hook up amp meters to the suspect components to see if they're pulling more than their rated power.

First buy a multimetre from a an auto store or hardware store, $15-25.

Start the car. As the user above pointed out, pull a battery cable if it continue running, you at least have running alternator. However, the alternator could be not charging enough, or over charging.

Set you multimetre to show voltage flow with at least the accuracy of one decimal place. Place the probes on the correct battery poles, red probe on the positive post and the black on the negative post.

If the multimeter reads below ~13.5 volts, it is not charging your battery, or charging it so slowly it would have to run for quite some time to fully charge; may need to replace the alternator.

A reading of ~13.5 to ~14.5 is somewhere in the norm.

And a reading above ~14.5 is probably a little high and you alternator is overcharging the battery; most likely a cheap-to-replace voltage regulator is the culprit. However, having being overcharged for an extensive amount of time may have damaged the battery.

Finally if you are still not sure, go to a trusted auto store and have them test your alternator; if you don't have a trusted auto store, don't be afraid to get a second opinion.

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Ford Expedition
Ford F-150

Where is number 1 cylinder on 302 ford cap?

The marked # 1 position on the distributor cap faces to the REAR

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Ford Explorer
Ford Expedition

How do you repair the blend door in the heater on a 2004 Ford Explorer?

"Blend door stuck and clicks on your 2004 Ford Explorer?" FIRST BUY OEM BLEND DOOR MOTOR $57.00 + UPTOOLS NEEDED :

PANEL TOOL OR FLAT BLADE SCREWDRIVER ,1/4 SOCETS 7 & 8MM

....1/4 HANDLE...1/4 SMALL EXTENTION...1/4 RATCHET

NO NEED TO REMOVE WHOLE DASHBOARD!!!REMOVE TWO7MM SCREWS FROM THE BOTTOM OF STEERING PANEL & PRY AND REMOVE PANEL.

NEXT REMOVE TWO 7MM SCREWS ON BLACK PLASTIC STRIP THAT YOU SEE AFTER REMOVING STEERING PANEL....PRY THIS STRIP OF PLASTIC OUT JUST A LITTLE AND CUT IN THE MIDDLE .

NEXT REMOVE TWO 7MM SCREWS FROM AROUND TOP OF INSTRUMENT PANEL (BY GAUGES ) PRY PANEL STARTING FROM AROUND VENT ON LEFT BY DRIVERS DOOR ""THIS PANEL WILL STAY IN PLACE LOOSE... NO NEED TO REMOVE!""

NEXT YOU WILL SEE 0NE 7MM SCREW BY GEAR SELECTOR AREA.. BEHIND THE LOOSE PANEL REMOVE THIS SCREW.. ALSO IN SAME AREA BUT LOWER THERE IS ONE 7MM SCREW THAT NEEDS TO BE REMOVED THAT HOLDS LOWER DASH PAD ITS FOUND BEHIND LOWER CORNER OF DASH PAD.( LOWER DASH PAD GAS PEDAL AREA )

"DON'T"!!! REMOVE THE FOUR 10MM BOLTS!!!! IN SAME AREA

NEXT REMOVE RADIO /AC CONTROL TRIM WITH THIN SCREW DRIVER OR PANEL TOOL IT HELD IN BY SIX CLIPS...NO NEED TO DISCONNET ANYTHING IT WILL STAY THERE HANGING!!

NEXT REMOVE TWO CENTER CONSOLE LOWER LARGE PLASTIC CLIPS BY FLOOR MATS. NEXT UNDER SQUARE BLACK RUBBER AT CENTER CONSOLE REMOVE ONE SILVER SCREW. MOVE SEATS FOWARD AND REMOVE TWO 8MM SCREWS FROM SIDES OF CENTER CONSOLE FROM BACK SEAT.

PRY CUP PANEL SECTION THAT WAS HELD DOWN BY SILVER SCREW ...PRY UP TOP HALF OF CONSOLE STARTING FROM SECTION WHERE ARMREST DOOR IS.. DISCONNECT LIGHTER PLUG AND REMOVE PANEL .

NOW YOU WILL SEE SIX SCREWS STARTING FROM BELOW RADIO TRIM WORKING BACK TO ARMREST DOOR .REMOVE ALL SIX..THESE HOLD THE BOTTOM PORTION OF THE CONSOLE ALSO DISCONNET ONE BLACK PLUG AND PULL ALL THE WIRES CLIPPED DOWN...PULL BOTTOM PORTION OF CONSOLE TO BACK SEAT.

PULL LOWER DASH PAD GIVE A NICE TUG.. IT SHOULD MOVE OUT A LITTLE ..DID YOU REMEMBER ONE SCREW BEHIND CORNER DASH..!.STARTING FROM AREA BY GAS PEDAL LOOK UP IN THIS AREA YOU WILL HAVE ENOUGH ROOM TO GET A LONG EXTENTION WITH AN 8MM SOCKET TO REMOVE 3 SCREWS HOLDING MOTOR TO BLACK PLASTIC SECTION..

REMOVE SCREWS DISCONNECT SMALL BLACK PLUG AND PULL MOTOR FROM SOCKET GOING TOWARD DRIVERS DOOR DIRECTION. ALIGN NEW MOTOR SHAFT WITH SOCKET

TIP.......IF NEED BE..... YOU COULD PLUG MOTOR HARNESS INTO NEW MOTOR THEN TURN IGNITION ON AND MOVE HEATER/AC CONTROLS TO GET THE SHAFT LINED UP..DONT MOVE ANY OTHER WAY!!!!!!NOW PUT SHAFT INTO SOCKET MAKE SURE YOU CONNECTED THE PLUG IF YOU HAVEN'T ALREADY!! INSTALL 8MM SCREWS AND TRY IT OUT YOU SHOULD HAVE HEAT NOW NOW INSTALL EVERTHING BACK IN REVERSE ORDERTOTAL TIME 45 MINUTESYOU JUST SAVED $350-$500 IN DEALER PRICES!!!DEALER 2.5 HOUR JOB! PLUS PART
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Head Gaskets and Valve Covers
Ford Expedition
Idioms, Cliches, and Slang

Does water on the pistons mean you cracked the head?

Most of the time if you have water in your oil you ruined a head gasket. If they took off the cover it was probably the valve cover. If they could see the pistons they would have had to have pulled the heads off and they would know for sure and would have fixed the problem as it takes a while to get the heads off and you would be able to see a crack in the head they had just taken off. If you lost all the water out of the radiator and the engine overheated you might have cracked the head. Some good mechanics can tell by looking at the spark plugs but if you have water in the oil it is not a good sign, something is usually serious. Have it checked!

If you cracked your head, you don't need a new engine. You will either need to have the crack repaired or get a new or remanufactured head.

I was losing about a quart a month, then a quart a week, then a quart a day of coolant in a Chevy 350 (Suburban). It ran pretty rough, real hard to start. Sure enough, after removing the heads, the cylinders were full of water. Its a wonder it ran at all. The heads had little cracks in them. It seems the cracks get started, then slowly eat out the head gasket, then the leak gets bigger more cracks, more leaks and so on until the cylinders fill up with water.

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Brake Pads and Rotors
Ford Expedition
Ford Expedition XLT

How do you replace the front brake pads on a 1999 Ford Expedition?

take the wheel off

2) You need to separate the brakes pads from the rotors. Remove the Calipers. You will need a TORX t-45 to remove the 2 bolts.

3) You need to decompress the calipers back using a C clamp.

4) the the old pads out, and replace with new. Do 1 at a time. One of them has a metal piece on it and the other does not.

5) Put Caliper back on and tigthen them.

6) Put wheel back on.

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Oxygen Sensors
Ford Expedition
Ford Expedition XLT
Ford F-250

Where are the four oxygen sensors located in a Ford F-250 SD truck?

two near the exhaust manifolds, one on the cross over pipe going to right side, last one on top of right side pipe in front of cat converter

118119120
Ford Expedition
Ford Expedition Eddie Bauer
Ford Expedition XLT

Where is the low pressure valve for recharging air conditioner on a 2000 Ford Expedition?

to find lo pressure recharge valve: 1. Locate transmission oil fill tube handle on engine risht side 2. Valve is about 2 inches up and 3 inches towards firewall from this handle on the accumulator; under and behind a few wiring harness connections. Don't give up...It is there. It is well camouflaged!

__________________________________________________________________

Answer

R12 Low Side 7/16 in. threadedß----------à R134 Low Side 13mm Quick-disconnect

R12 High Side 3/8 in. threadedß----------à R134A High Side 16mm Quick-disconnect

its under the truck by the compressor

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Ford Expedition

What does the limited mean on ford expedition limited?

limited is a trim level , above Eddie Bauer trim level , which is above the XLT trim level

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Fuel and Engines
Emissions and Exhaust Systems
Ford Expedition

Why would smoke come from behind the engine?

Bend over a little farther... doesn't that feel good to see the oil leaking leaking out of the valve cover? Probably not, but those are common for leaks, I think it may be a valve cover gasket. Get a neoprene one, not cork if you plan to change it your self. Could be leaking from anywhere back there I have seen them leak from the distributor. Check and see if you can spot the leak you may have to power wash the engine first if it is very dirty and greasy.

I agree, oil leaking from the valve cover gasket will seep down the engine and burn away when the engine is hot enough. That's why you will probably notice smoke coming from the engine (in your case the back).

I suspect that when you come to a stop in city traffic you see the smoke leaving through the grill or from under the car, and a small wind might even help it move into your cabin if the windows are open. Valve covers aren't that expensive to replace on older cars, but on newer cars labor can be more.

!

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Steering and Suspension
Toyota Camry
Ford Expedition
Ford Bronco II

Why does the steering wheel squeak when you turn a hard left or right on a 1996 Camry?

Could be the steering column spiral (the wire harness that's coiled up and includes wires that connect to the horn/cruise, etc.) needs to be replaced. Or the steering bolt needs lubrication.

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Ford Windstar
Ford Expedition
Ford Windstar LX

How do you change the air filter on a 1999-2003 Ford Windstar?

The air filter is in the large diameter (about 8" across) tube on the right side of the engine - windshield side of the battery.

There's a lever that releases the retainer clip to access the filter inside. ON the top right of the engine there is a oblong black plastic tube (about 6 inches in diameter) with a metal clasp on the top. open it and separate the 2 sides and remove the old air filter and put in the new one. re-connect the tube and close the clasp. I found it helpful to loosen the clamps that hold the rubber gasket just prior to the filter housing. Don't forget to reconnect the hose on the back side of the filter.

On the top of the engine there should be a BIG black tubular looking hose going from the engine to the driver's side of the engine compartment The air filter is inside this. There is a latch thing. lift up on this latch and it will snap open. pull then end that is toward the engine away from the piece that is attached to the side. the air filter sits inside the piece that is on the side of the compartment. pull it out. It does take a little wiggling it around to get it out. MAKE SURE that when you install the filter the "hole" side of the filter should be facing the engine. Hope this helps. If you mean the engine air filter then you just undo the two screws that hold on the air cover box top and lift it up. Pull the filter out and then replace it. Make sure the accordion look side goes upwards away from the engine. If you mean the cabin air filter then it behind a plastic cover that is on the passenger side engine compartment up under the wiper area of the cowl. Remove the two screws and remove the cover and pull out the filter and then put in a new one. SIMPLE. Good luck. I will base this answer on changing the air filter for a large majority of vehicles. It is a very simple process involving locating the air filter in the engine compartment, unlatching it - or in some cases, removing a few screws, removing the old filter and replacing it with the new one.

105106107
Spark Plugs and Wires
Ford Expedition
Ford Expedition XLT

Where is the 5 cylinder on 2001 Ford Expedition?

FIREWALL 4 - 8 3 - 7 2 - 6 1 - 5 FRONT

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Dashboard Lights and Gauges
Ford Explorer
Chevy Celebrity
Check Engine Light
Ford Expedition

Why would a 1988 Chevy Celebrity speedometer and odometer stop working and engine light blink on and off and turn off when stopped?

The main reason that a speedometer and odometer will stop is because the speed sensor, located on the back top area of the transmission, has gone faulty. The part can be had very easily at any auto parts store, or junkyard. The reason the check engine light is on is because the speed sensor signal goes thru the ECM (computer) for the car to run the different things. If the signal is intermitent, or interupted, the light is set, as well as the speedo and odometer not working.

Another reason is that the ECM it's self is bad, you can locate the ECM behind the glovebox and give it a few knocks while the car is running, if your engine responds by cutting out (even just a little) then replace it. they are around $110.

Since there is no speedo cable, it must be an electrical issue with a sensor.

Question

Why is there no speedometer cable? Does it have digital gauges?

The reason I ask, is, when I first got my 1986 Celebrity, the speedometer and odometer did not work. The previous owner had bought a new speed sensor, but had not had it put in yet. I installed it first thing. no luck. In checking the speedometer cable, I found it was broken, (the end of the cable at the tans-axle). After I replaced the speedometer cable, it worked fine.

Now, I cannot imaging gm did away with speedometer cables in the two years before the 1988 came out. I do have a 1990 S-15 with digital gauges, and I know it does not have a speedometer cable. But, the 1990 Sunbird I used to own, with analog gauges, did have one.

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Ford Expedition

How Change headlight 2005 Ford Expedition?

This could be easy or it could be a REAL pain in the butt. I found out the hard way, by trusting a vague internet answer to this same question, that it can be harder than it would seem. Now that I have done it a couple of times, and broken 2 little parts on my car, it is now pretty easy! Here goes:

1. Using a 13/32 mm socket (you will probably need an extension), unbolt a total of 3 bolts per headlight. There are 2 on top that run parallel to the ground, and a 3rd one that is VERY long, running perpindicular to the ground, in a hole between the 1st 2 bolts.

2. Now the hard part--that is all you need to pull the headlight out, but pulling it out is a HUGE pain in the butt and you risk breaking something like I did! You DON'T want to pull on the outermost edge of the headlight assembly, thereby rotating the light inwards towards the middle of the car--this is how I broke a plastic tab off where the 3rd bolt (mentioned above) goes. No big deal--just annoying! I think the best way is to pull the assembly up (from the bottom) and out (from the innermost portion of the headlight assembly) first--once you clear the flimsy plastic surround of the grill/front bumper, you can pull on the outermost edge of the headlight assembly and pull the entire thing forward.

3. Finally, if you are replacing the regular headlight (not the high beams), then remove the rubber boot to expose the lamp. Then gently rotate the bulb assembly counterclockwise a little bit and pull the lamp out.

4. Take a screwdriver and gently pry the tab on the electrical connector upwards to release the bulb assembly from the electrical connector.

5. Attach the new bulb assembly to the electrical connector, then put it back by aligning the 3 tabs and turning the bulb assembly clockwise until it stops.

6. Replace the rubber boot.

7. TEST the light 1st, then if all is ok, slide the headlight back in--it goes in VERY easily (about 10x easier than it was to take it out).

8. Replace the 3 bolts, and grab a cool drink!

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Lincoln Town Car
Ford Expedition
Air Filters and Intake Manifolds

How do you change the EGR valve on a 1994 Lincoln Town Car?

you have a clogged egr port going from the passenger side rar of motor our the exhaust tube is broken either way the intake port should be cleaned. you have to disasemble the intake manifold . over here it a $250.00 + parts job turbojoe

EGR Channels clog first!Check this EGR Channel Cleaning article before you go any further. http://www.lincolnsonline.com/tech/00015.html
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Cars & Vehicles
Timing and Firing Orders
Ford Expedition
Ford F-150

What is the firing order on 1998 Firebird 3.8 liter?

1-6-5-4-3-2

1-6-5-4-3-2

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Ford Expedition
Ford Expedition Eddie Bauer
Ford Expedition XLT

How do you put the knobs back on the climate control of a 1999 Ford Expedition?

place super glue on the knob, and push it on. let it sit over night and it will be good as new in the morning THEY SHOULD JUST PUSH BACK ON

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Ford Expedition

The cylinder 3 on a Ford Expedition engine?

firewall

4 - 8

3 - 7

2 - 6

1 - 5

front

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Ford Expedition
Ford Expedition Eddie Bauer
Ford Expedition XLT

How would you remove the door panel from a 1998 Ford Expedition?

Here is how I removed the front passenger side door panel from a 1999 Ford Expedition. The driver's side door should be the same, except for the mirror switch which needs to be unplugged. The 1998 *might* be the same, I don't know, but this should be helpful to someone.

Use a flat blade screwdriver or other suitable tool to pry out on the top of the triangular plastic panel on the top front of the door panel. The plastic holder should pull out of the door. Now pry up on both sides of the triangular panel and pull it loose. Remove the Philips head screw you find under this panel. Pull the door latch handle, pry out the insert where the handle goes through, and remove the bolt that holds the door handle in place. Remove the door handle. Pry up on the ends of the door switch panel to remove it. Unplug the cables by pushing in on the lock tab on the side of the plug and pulling out. Remove the Philips head screw accessible through the switch panel hole. Insert a flat blade screwdriver into the slot at the bottom of the courtesy light lens and pry up and out to remove the lens. Remove the Philips head screw behind this lens. Pull up on the door panel to remove it. Be careful of the courtesy light when removing the panel - give the light a quarter turn counter-clockwise from the rear to remove it from the door panel.

The F-150 appears to be the same as my '99 Expedition - try for some instructions on an F-150, this was helpful for me.

Not a whole lot to improve on this is right on - try visiting Strutmasters.com and see what else we can do for you.

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