Iron Age

Characterized by the introduction of iron metallurgy, the Iron Age is the period in cultural development which succeeded the Bronze Age. It was the final technological and cultural state in the Three-Age System of the Stone, Bronze, and Iron Age.

Asked in Stone Age, Iron Age, Cannibalism

The ancient nordic tribe of cannibals the wendor?

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The Wendol were a relict group of Neanderthals. They were fictional, and can be found in the book the 13th Warrior (Eaters of the Dead) by Michael Crichton.
Asked in Coins and Paper Money, Roman Empire, Iron Age

Why did roman coins decrease?

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The Romans more or less stopped making coins when their Empire shrunk, they lost many lands where they could mine silver and gold, therefore they had not the materials to mint coins.
Asked in Iron Age

When did the iron age begin in briton?

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Although the transition between archaeological periods is often gradual the most commonly accepted date for the start of the Iron Age in Britain is 800BC.
Asked in Iron Age

How was the Tollund man discovered?

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The Tollund Man was discovered when two men, Viggo and Emil Hojgaard, were digging peat. They first found his head, then they called the police, who then dug up his entire body, and to this day, it is still talked about.
Asked in Iron Age

What jobs were there in the iron age?

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discovering some weapons with the new metals (invention on the Iron age).
Asked in Chemistry, History of Science, Iron Age, Elements and Compounds

Who discovered iron?

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The exact person who first discovered iron is unknown, because its first uses predate any reliable historical records.
Asked in Iron Age

How did the Iron age affect technology?

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it can affect the technology because of the gravity of earth
Asked in Iron Age

When was the Iron Age?

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the iron age was between BC 700 and AD 300 Classically, the Iron Age is taken to begin in the 12th century BC Bronze Age collapse in the ancient Near East, ancient India (with the post-Rigvedic Vedic civilization), ancient Iran, and ancient Greece (with the Greek Dark Ages). Iron use, in smelting and forging for tools, also appears in West Africa by 1200 BC. In other regions of Europe, the Iron Age began in the 8th century BC in Central Europe and the 6th century BC in Northern Europe. The Near Eastern Iron Age is divided into two subsections, Iron I and Iron II. Iron I (1200-1000 BC) illustrates both continuity and discontinuity with the previous Late Bronze Age. There is no definitive cultural break between the thirteenth and twelfth century throughout the entire region, although certain new features in the hill country, Transjordan and coastal region may suggest the appearance of the Aramaean and Sea People groups. There is evidence, however, that shows strong continuity with Bronze Age culture, although as one moves later into Iron I the culture begins to diverge more significantly from that of the late second millennium. The Iron Age is usually said to end in the Mediterranean with the onset of historical tradition during Hellenism and the Roman Empire, in India with the onset of Buddhism and Jainism, in China with the onset of Confucianism, and in Northern Europe with the early Middle Ages
Asked in Iron Age, Sparta, Women in History

Spartan women were trained in?

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running,wrestling,and javelin throwing.
Asked in Iron Age

How did the iron age mine iron?

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They would have dug it out with sharp rocks, or where the ground was worn away, the iron would be able to have been taken out. But back then, even though technology was not invented, man-kind was very powerful as they used their minds to rely on doing things instead of electricity
Asked in Health, Animal Life, Iron Age

How was early man's life?

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Early men spent most of their time hunting for food, making and using tools, keeping warm, etc... basically, surviving.
Asked in Iron Age

How did discovery of iron led to the changes in early societies?

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the discovery of iron lead to changes in sosiotie with new tools and items to use in there every day life. this is the history and ect. A thousand years before the age of empires in Rome and Greece, the Iron Age was ushered into the world with the clank and clatter of the blacksmith's anvil.The transition from the bronze ageoccurred at different times in different spots on the globe, but when and where it did, the distinctive dark metal brought with it significant changes to daily life in ancient society, from the way people grew crops to the way they fought wars. Iron has remained an essential element for more than 3,000 years, through the Industrial Revolution - helping Britain become the foremost industrial power - and into today in its more sophisticated form, steel. this is the hystory i hope you enjoyed
Asked in Ancient History, Iron Age, Iron Man (superhero)

Why did the Tollund Man die?

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The consensus is that Tollund Man died by hanging, after ingesting an hallucinogen, as a sacrifice. One proposal is that this was a sacrifice to Nerthus, goddess of fertility in Denmark.
Asked in Iron Age

What was iron used for in the iron ages?

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Iron was used to make tools that had been previously made of bronze. Such as knives, swords, arrow heads, ect.
Asked in Earth Sciences, Mining, Iron Age, Elements and Compounds

When was iron discovered?

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iron has actually always been around, people dug it up at various times, and scientists aren't sure who discovered it first although many want to credit themselves. the iron age. about 100 years ad. but you should get the specifics
Asked in Cleopatra, Iron Age

What empire ruled Egypt in the 2nd century AD?

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The Roman empire ruled Egypt in the second century AD. The Roman empire ruled Egypt in the second century AD. The Roman empire ruled Egypt in the second century AD. The Roman empire ruled Egypt in the second century AD. The Roman empire ruled Egypt in the second century AD. The Roman empire ruled Egypt in the second century AD. The Roman empire ruled Egypt in the second century AD. The Roman empire ruled Egypt in the second century AD. The Roman empire ruled Egypt in the second century AD.
Asked in Business & Finance, Roman Empire, Iron Age

Should you still use aqueducts?

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We do still use aqueducts. An aqueduct is nothing more than a water pipe. We get our water to our homes by water pipes, so in effect we are still using them. If you are meaning the ancient Roman aqueducts, some of them or parts of them are still in use today for irrigation and industrial purposes. There are still working aqueducts serving the city of Rome itself. We do still use aqueducts. An aqueduct is nothing more than a water pipe. We get our water to our homes by water pipes, so in effect we are still using them. If you are meaning the ancient Roman aqueducts, some of them or parts of them are still in use today for irrigation and industrial purposes. There are still working aqueducts serving the city of Rome itself. We do still use aqueducts. An aqueduct is nothing more than a water pipe. We get our water to our homes by water pipes, so in effect we are still using them. If you are meaning the ancient Roman aqueducts, some of them or parts of them are still in use today for irrigation and industrial purposes. There are still working aqueducts serving the city of Rome itself. We do still use aqueducts. An aqueduct is nothing more than a water pipe. We get our water to our homes by water pipes, so in effect we are still using them. If you are meaning the ancient Roman aqueducts, some of them or parts of them are still in use today for irrigation and industrial purposes. There are still working aqueducts serving the city of Rome itself. We do still use aqueducts. An aqueduct is nothing more than a water pipe. We get our water to our homes by water pipes, so in effect we are still using them. If you are meaning the ancient Roman aqueducts, some of them or parts of them are still in use today for irrigation and industrial purposes. There are still working aqueducts serving the city of Rome itself. We do still use aqueducts. An aqueduct is nothing more than a water pipe. We get our water to our homes by water pipes, so in effect we are still using them. If you are meaning the ancient Roman aqueducts, some of them or parts of them are still in use today for irrigation and industrial purposes. There are still working aqueducts serving the city of Rome itself. We do still use aqueducts. An aqueduct is nothing more than a water pipe. We get our water to our homes by water pipes, so in effect we are still using them. If you are meaning the ancient Roman aqueducts, some of them or parts of them are still in use today for irrigation and industrial purposes. There are still working aqueducts serving the city of Rome itself. We do still use aqueducts. An aqueduct is nothing more than a water pipe. We get our water to our homes by water pipes, so in effect we are still using them. If you are meaning the ancient Roman aqueducts, some of them or parts of them are still in use today for irrigation and industrial purposes. There are still working aqueducts serving the city of Rome itself. We do still use aqueducts. An aqueduct is nothing more than a water pipe. We get our water to our homes by water pipes, so in effect we are still using them. If you are meaning the ancient Roman aqueducts, some of them or parts of them are still in use today for irrigation and industrial purposes. There are still working aqueducts serving the city of Rome itself.
Asked in Stone Age, Iron Age, Neanderthal

What kind of shelters did neanderthal use?

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They were stone age hunter/gatherers, who lived in caves and rock shelters.

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