Mercury Sable

Manufactured by Ford Motor Company, the Mercury Sable was offered as a mid-size sedan in 1986-2005 and as a full-size sedan in 2008-2009. One significant feature of the vehicle was its front light bar – a lamp fitted between the vehicle’s front headlamps.

3,422 Questions
Headlights Tail and Brake Lights
Ford Taurus
Mercury Sable

How do you replace the tail - turn or brake light bulbs on a Ford Taurus?

You go through the trunk and on either side is the light housing unit that you remove 4 nuts from, pull out and there will be the individual bulbs to be replaced.

IN DEPTH:

In order to replace the light bulbs you will have to remove the entire rear light housing unit. In order to do this you must do the following:

  1. Pop the trunk.
  2. Loosen the trunk lining in order to reach the 4 nuts that are located on the right or left side and hold the light housing in place.
  3. You loosen the trunk lining fabric by removing two small, black plastic fasteners that anchor the trunk lining fabric. These either screw loose or you will need to pop off using a blunt- nosed pliers ( a flat head screwdriver works in a pinch) by first pulling the square bit out (towards the direction of the back seat,) followed by the circular components.
  4. Pull the fabric loose on either the left or right side to expose the 4 nuts holding the light assembly in place.
  5. Now, look for the four gold colored washer and nut assemblies surrounding the tail-light assembly. Find yourself a 7/16 socket and remove those bad boys. The tail-light itself should be able to pop- out, otherwise you've missed a washer- nut.
  6. Ease the tail- light assembly off of it's perch on the car and hold it red- side down. This will expose the wiring and "turn- locks" for the blinker and tail- light.
  7. Remove the bulbs from the assembly by turning the turn- locks in the direction (counter- clockwise) indicated by the plastic molding, and pulling upwards, off of the tail- light assembly.
  8. Pull the bulb from the turn- lock with a moderate tug of the hand.

She's out! Success!

And don't forget to put the other one in before you close everything back up

- 2000-2005

These procedures are well detailed and illustrated in the Owners Manual - See "Related Questions"

The tail light, brake light, turn signal and backup light bulbs are located in the same tail lamp / lens assembly. Follow the same steps to replace either bulb.

Sedan

  1. Open trunk and remove two plastic mushroom nuts, five push pins and the plastic cover from inside the trunk to get at the lens mounting nuts

    The nuts are likely 10mm - and a deep-well socket will handy to speed removal

  2. Remove three nuts and washers and the lens will pull away making it easy to get at the bulb sockets. Turn counter-clockwise to release the socket

Wagon

  1. Open the liftgate to remove the 2 lens assemblies mounting screws -
  2. Pull the lens assembly from the tailgate
  3. Twist the bulb socket counterclockwise to release
  4. Pull the bulb straight out of the socket and push in the new bulb.

Tip: the old adage if one goes, the other is likely to follow shortly is true in my experience. While you've got the tools out, and typically you get 2 bulbs in the package, just do the bulbs on both sides of the car - you'll be back out there real soon anyways.

It's done from inside the trunk -- there are 5 11mm nuts behind the lens assembly area. The upper three nuts remove the tail lamp assembly.

There are two bulbs..running light and break light bulbs. The bulb to the red glass compartment / portion of the lens is the brake light bulb. Takes about 5 minutes unscrewing the nuts, replacing the bulb, screwing the nuts back on and finally replacing the liner.

You have to remove the 'carpeted' panel behind it in the trunk and then remove all of the bolts that holds the brake light assembly in place. The assembly will pull out and then you remove the light socket from the assembly, replace the bulb and reverse this process to re install. The clips to remove the carpeted panel require a flat screwdriver to 'pry' them out and then they pull straight out. Whole process takes about 10 minutes if you know what you're doing (I didn't the first time, took about 30 minutes)

Additional Information1996-2005

Bulb Numbers:

  • FRONT Turn-signal - 3457 AK (amber)
  • Headlamp - 9007 QL (9007LL optional)
  • Tail lamp/brake/turn lamp 3157
  • Tail lamp/brake lamp (wagon) 3157
  • Rear turn lamp (wagon) 3456K
  • Backup lamp 921
  • Backup lamp (wagon) 3156
  • License plate lamp (2) 168
  • High-mount brake lamp (2) 912
  • Rear side marker lamp (wagon) (2) 168

The above information extracted from the Owners Manuals(see below)

tail light 2000 Taurus

Open the trunk and pull the carpet away from the back of the tail lights and then all you have to do is twist and pull out old bulb

As answer above except. I own a 2000 Ford Taurus SES and I found when you pull the sides over inside the trunk there you'll find three (3) nuts. Take the three nuts off, then carefully pull on the light cover. Once you have the tail light off the car, turn it over. Ya'll see the back of the light socket. Carefully turn the light socket and pull it out. Now you can change your balb.

To remove the tail light lens on a 2003 Taurus you open the trunk. Inside the truck below the opening on the left and right side are black knobs. Remove the knob on the side of the truck that you wish to remove the tail light lens. This knob is on a stud with a nut that needs to be removed as well as the interior insulation. The insulation right behind the tail light lens needs to be pulled away to expose the nuts that attach the tail light lens.Remove these nuts/washer and carefully pull the lens away from the car. To remove the two bulbs/wire assemblies from the back of the lens turn the bulb socket 1/4 turn counter-clockwise. The lens is now free of the vehicle.

You will need to remove two trim clips, the first one is on the edge of the hard plastic trim and the second one is right behind the light. you then should be able to pull back the carpet trim, you should be now able to see the three bolts that hold the light assembly in place. You may see five bolts, but only three need to be removed. The lower one on the outside and the lower one on the inside do not need to be removed. you will need a 7/16 nut driver or socket, and once the three nuts are removed the assembly should just pull off. you may have to unclip the power cord so that you can turn the socket a 1/4 turn and it should just pull out. the replacement bulb is a 3157. good luck.

You can fix it on your own but another pair of hands will make this fix alot easier. Open the trunk, remove the inside panel, the side that you want to change, that's right behind the tail light. Use a flat tip screw driver to remove the plastic anchors locate at the face of the panel(s), usually black. You will see hex nuts that are holding in the light assembly. Use a deep socket, it works better. Once the nuts are removed the light assembly will slide out and you can rotate the light holder assembly and then change the bulds. When putting it back together, make sure the rubber around the light assembly is placed correctly, if not, water my come into the trunk compartment. You can email me if this helped you out at rwb4u2c@msn.com Bob Blaze

After pulling up the lining in the trunk, you must remove all the nuts, including the one behind the knob for the cargo netting. Twist off the cargo netting knob and then remove the nut behind there and the whole taillight assembly will be removable.

YOU MUST REMOVE THE CARPET IN THE TRUNK THAT COVERS THE TAIL LIGHT THEN REMOVE THE BOLTS THAT HOLD THE TAIL NLIGHT IN. FROM THE OUTSIDE, REMOVE THE WHOLE TAILLIGHT ASSEMBLY AND THE THE BULB IN QUESTION. SIMPLY REPLACE THE BAD BULB THEN REVERSE YOUR STEPS ABOUT 15 TO 30 MIN. GOOD LUCK

In order to get to the rear turn signal, you will first need to remove the center panel located below the opening of the trunk lid. This is held in place by three push rivets. They are about 3 inches long and will come out with some tugging. Now, lift up on the panel to remove it. Once the center panel is out, all you need to do now is unscrew the mushroom hook located at the edge of the side panel. The light assembly is located behind this panel. The light bulb socket will loosen by twisting it approx. 1/4 turn counterclockwise.

Since the plastic "rivets" are difficult to remove, I recommend replacing them with screw type push rivets for the next time you do this. I found some a NAPA that works pretty well. The part number for these is 665-2114.

Check the bulbs. If one isn't flashing, replace the bulb by turning it counterclockwise in the rear of the light . Sometimes you have to remove the light from the car to get to the back of the light. If they all burn but still blink fast it is a sign of a partially grounded circuit which will have to be manually traced or an incorrect bulb in the circuit.

open the trunk and usually there is screws there. on the top as well as the bottom. unscrew those and pull out.

Open the trunk and remove the lining on the side you are changing. There are some plastic pins that hold the lining in place. You can pull those out with a flat screwdriver and pliers. You will see usually three large black wing shaped nuts that you can unscrew by hand. Sometimes a little tight so you may use pliers to get them started. Once they are off you can pull the whole tailight out. Hold the receptacle that holds the bulb you are changing turn it counter clockwise till it stops then pull it straight out. Pull bulb straight out of the socket push new bulb in and replace everything in reverse order. Test lights before you put it all back together.

Open the trunk. REmove the trunk liner from around the tail lights. That will expose the retaining nuts that hold the tail light assembly in place. Remove the nuts. Remove the tail light. Twist the bulb socket 1/4 turn and pull out. Reverse to install.

first open the trunk then remove the plastic panel on the rear trunk wall this is done by removing the two cargo net hooks or round nob looking things unscrews by hand no tool needed and two push clip. once plastic is removed then carefully pull the corner carpeting back on the side you want to replace. finely locate the four mounting studs just behind ware the lens is on the inside trunk area.remove the 10mm nuts with a deep well socket.

You must first remove the plastic cover directly inside the rear of the trunk. Then you mush remove the trunk lining from what ever side you need access. There are 3 nuts on the back side of the cover inside the trunk area. You must revove these e nuts, and they push the assembly out from inside the trunk. You may have to use something to pry the assembly away from the body. Once removed, you have access to the lamp socket. You muse turn the socket counter clockwise and remove the socket and bulb. Change the bulb and reverse the process.

Tail-light 98 Taurus

When you first open the trunk, you will see the grey lining being held with multiple black fasteners. Depending on what side the bulb is on, you need only remove two or three of the fasteners on the desired side. Once you locate and remove the fasteners, pull the lining back and you will see the multiple stud/nuts that hold the tail-light assembly in place. I believe it is a 3/8 deep socket that will remove those nuts. The assembly will pull out as a whole so take caution not to use extra force removing it from the vehicle.

Open trunk. Remove trunk liner. Remove bolts that hold light assembly in place. Pull light assembly out. Rotate socket 1/4 turn and entire socket will come out.

I own a 2000 Taurus SE and was surprised to see how much trouble it was to change a tail light. On my Taurus, I have to remove the interior panel on the inside, back of the trunk. You have to pop the plastic round clips off---which means you may have to go buy replacments. Once you get the panel off, the light is right there. Simply twist to remove the socket and then twist out the bulb.

open trunk, pull back trim (after removing nuts), remove nuts securing lens to body, twist connector and gently pull back, pull bulb out. reverse to install

In the trunk pull back the trunk lining. There will be plastic wing nuts. remove the wing nuts and pull out the brake light housing. You can change the bulb when you pull out the tail light assembly

open the trunk, remove the inside trim panel closest to the tailight assembly you are trying to service. Remove the three of four 7/16 nuts that hold the tailight in, and remove the assembly to access and replace the bulbs.

Open trunk.

Remove carpet on the side that the the bad bulb is on. Use kitchen fork to remove the plastic buttons that hold carpet if you don't have a puller.

Remove plastic twist nuts that bsecure tail light.

Pull out tail light and you are at the bulb.

Look in the trunk pull back the fabrick and youll see the back of the light plug twist it and pull out take the bad bulb to auto store and replace with new one

Be sure to review the "Related Questions" below for much more about Taurus lights

Turn the bulb holder counter-clockwise to remove it from the taillight assembly. Remove the bulb and install new one.

1.05k
Mercury Sable
Thermostats

Where is the thermostat located and how to change on a Taurus - Sable?

Which way does it go?

The spring-side of the thermostat should be positioned towards the engine.

Logical when you think about the spring is what reacts to the temperature of the coolant - expanding and contracting with the heat levels - thus driving the opening and closing of the valve.

Torquing the Bolts

Not much, only 8-10 ft.lbs.

Location

3.0 Vulcan and 3.8, 12 valve engines:

  • Looking in from the front of the car, it is on the right side of the engine, where the radiator hose goes in - underneath a large wiring harness and is difficult to see.
  • Remove the housing's three bolts - the thermostat will be inside.

    CAUTION NOTE for Vulcan Engines: From user WRENCHDUDE: the bottom thermostat housing bolt has been known to break off and has only occurred to me on the Vulcan engine. The problem seem to happen if corrosion sets up in the bolt hole. When you break off the bolt you wont have any trouble at all noticing the corrosion.

    The big headache is that the bolt is small and it breaks off into aluminum. There is nothing sticking up to get vise grips on. Trying to drill the bolt out without going out of the bolt and eating into the aluminum is the trick. I've gotten to the point at my shop here (after breaking off that lower bolt on 2 different cars) that i dont even want to change thermostats on a Vulcan engine again. You cant just use the other 2 bolts as it wont seal the thermo housing. Those bolts should have been thicker direct from the factory,they are just too scrawny.. The older the car...the more likely the problem.

(Note, this problem can typically be avoided if the bolt is cleaned and lubricated prior to insertion, and if the bolt is inserted carefully. If any resistance is occurred, stop, back the bolt out 1/4 turn, and then attempt to continue. If this doesn't work, spray a little amount of WD-40 into the hole to assist in insertion.)
  • Follow the large top radiator hose to the engine block. it connects to a little dome-shaped fitting held on by three bolts. The thermostat is under it. be sure to replace the gasket (after completely removing the old gasket) when you replace the thermostat.

3.0 Duratec, 24 valve DOHC engine:

If you have the 24 valve DOHC engine, the thermostat is on the other side (passenger) at the bottom front of the engine, accessible from underneath. It has 2 10 mm bolts securing the housing and a hose run to it

AnswerOnce you have located the thermostat, unscrew the 2 or 3 bolts and pull the thermostat out of the tubing. There will be a circular band that comes with it, keep it and put it in with the new one. Be careful because anti-freeze will most likely pour out when you open up the tubing. Slide the new thermostat into place where the old one was and put the circular band back in place. then screw the hoses back together. You also have to "burp" all the tubing which means to take all the air out and create a vacuum. I've never done this, so that's the only part I don't know how to do.

This should be pretty much the same for most cars. Follow the upper radiator hose from the radiator to the engine. Where the hose meets the engine is where your thermostat is. Just make sure you put the new one in the correct way. If you put it in backwards it will not function correctly and you could overheat your engine. You should also make sure you need it. You car is known for heating issues. If the engine temp does not come up to regular operating temps, than your thermostat is stuck open and needs replaced. If the temp on the engine does come up to normal, than there are several potential issues. For your car, the most likely issues for the heater are: cooling system needs flushed and back flushed as well as the heater core. Or the flap that blends the heat (inside dash) is warped and letting cold air in. Or the heater core is bad. I have heard of one other possibility, but I do not know much about it, and it has to do with a vacuum line that controls the heat mixer being broke, disconnected or plugged.

Hope this helps.

Answer

It is located under the thermostat housing at the rear of the engine which is on the driver's side of the vehicle. Follow the top radiator hose back to the engine, and there is where the t-stat housing is located. If you have a 3.0 engine, it is held on with three 10mm bolts. If it is a 3.8 liter, it is held with two 10mm bolts.

Answer

Follow the top radiator hose back to the engine. There is where the t-stat housing is. Remove the hose, remove the housing, remove the old t-stat, clean gasket surfaces install the t-stat into the housing with the spring side sticking out toward the engine, use spray adhesive to attach the gasket(DO NOT USE RTV), reinstall everything and be careful to evenly tighten the housing bolts until they are snug(DO NOT RAUNCH HARD ON THE BOLTS). Fill the cooling system with a 50/50 mix of coolant and water, and burp the system.

Answer

Should be located in a removable housing at the engine end of the upper radiator hose

Drain about 1 gallon of coolant from the radiator

Remove this housing

Note how thermostat is installed in housing

Clean both surfaces

Replace thermostat and gasket

Replace housing

Re-fill coolant slowly to prevent an air lock

Start engine and look for leaks

Run engine to normal operating temperature with heater on

Re-check coolant level

Answer

First, go to a parts supplier and buy the thermostat and gasket that is appropriate for your car. You will also need coolant to replace what you will loose when you disconnect the hose.

Drain the engine cooling system so that the engine coolant level is below the water thermostat. Disconnect the upper radiator hose from the water hose connection. Remove the three water inlet connection retaining bolts Remove the water hose connection. Remove the gasket and water thermostat from the water hose connection. Install the water thermostat, gasket and water hose connection. Install and alternately tighten the retaining bolts. Connect the upper radiator hose to the water hose connection Fill the cooling system with a 50/50 mixture of the proper anti-freeze and water. Start the engine and check all hoses and connections for leaks. Allow the engine to warm up so that the water thermostat opens Stop the engine. Top off the coolant overflow reservoir as required to maintain minimum cold fill level.

Answer

Should be located in a removable housing at the engine end of the upper radiator hose

Drain about 1 gallon of coolant from the radiator

Remove this housing

note how thermostat is installed

Clean both surfaces

Replace thermostat and gasket

Replace housing

Re-fill coolant slowly to prevent an air lock

Start engine and look for leaks

Run engine to normal operating temperature with heater on

Re-check coolant level

On almost all cars, the thermostat is located where the top radiator hose connects to the motor. There should be a housing there held on with 2 or 3 nuts or bolts.

Follow the upper radiator hose to where it meets the engine. Remove the 3 bolts that hold the gooseneck in place. Remove the housing. Pull out the old T-stat. Note the location of the "jiggle pin". Replace with new T-stat in same position. Apply RTV sealer to the surfaces and replace the housing and bolts.

Answer

Copy & Paste the link below. Good luck. Easy to do.

http://www.autozone.com/servlet/UiBroker?ForwardPage=/az/cds/en_us/0900823d/80/0b/f3/fe/0900823d800bf3fe.jsp

Thermostat Location

In order to find the thermostat look at the top radiator hose follow it back toward the engine, you will a metal housing with about 2 or 3 bolts, unloose these bolts and replace the thermostat.

Answer

On the OHV Engine (Vulcan Engine) follow top radiator hose from radiator to engine. Disconnect top radiator hose, remove the three bolts, pull off thermostat housing and remove thermostat. OHC Engine, drain radiator until the coolant level is below the lower coolant level on the engine. Raise vehicle support it with jack stands. Disconnnect the lower radiator hose from the coolant inlet housing, remove the two inlet housing bolts and the housing. Then remove the thermostat and the O ring from the thermostat housing.

Answer

The thermostat is located inside the water neck on the drivers side of the engine. You will see a large hose going to the top of the radiator and to the water neck. You will need both the thermostat and gasket before you start, I would also recomment some RTV sealant, and two new hose clamps and about a half gallon of coolant mixture. Start by draining about one gallon of coolant from the radiator, via the valve located on the drivers side bottom of the radiator in to a bucket. Next remove the large Hose from the water neck and radiator. Next remove the two or three bolts that hold down the water neck, and gently pry it loose from the intake manifold. The thermostat may come out with it or may stay in the manifold. Remove the thermostat. Clean both the intake and water neck well, removing any old gasket material, oxidation or sealant. Next install the thermostat, some lock into the water neck by a quarter turn method, some you will find handy to RTV in with a small amount spread evenly around the edge between the thermostat and water neck recess for the thermostat. Be certain to orient the thermostat the correct way, the valve end goes away from the engine, and the small tower that retains the spring goes towards the engine. Install the new gasket with a small amount of RTV to hold it onto the water neck, then a small amount to seal between the gasket and manifold. Install the water neck with the original bolts, and tighten snugly, but don't over torque them. Next replace the hose clamps and if the hose is in good shape, re-install it. If the hose is not in good shape replace it as well. Next put the coolant you drained in step one back into the radiator through it's fill neck. Use the spare coolant mixture to top off the system. With the Radiator cap removed, have an assistant start the engine, and run with the heater set to maximum heat, until the car is at normal opperating temperature. Have your assistant rev the engine and hold it at about 3000 RPM. This will cause the water pump to pull the maximum flow of coolant into the engine to purge any air bubbles that remain. Tap up the coolant and replace the cap. Fill the overflow bottle almost to the top of the bottle, this will allow the engine to pull any necessary coolant into the system as the engine cools down over the next couple of days. Keep an eye open for leaks and watch the temperature gauge over the next few days, any rapid spikes and drops in temperature while driving, indicate an air bubble. These cars are well known for air bubbles, and if you have one, you will have to go through the purge steps again until things normalize out, elsewise you could warp a head or crack a head.

AnswerThis site explains everything to change the thermostat on 88 Taurus.

http://autorepair.about.com/library/a/1e/bl207e.htm

AnswerFollow the big hose from the top of the radiator, back toward the engine. The hose attaches to the thermostat housing, which is removed to get access to the thermostat.

Depending on the motor 3.8 or 3.0, it will be located within the aluminum piece (housing) that is connected to the upper radiator hose (large rubber hose about 2" in diameter). If you are changing the thermostat ($6), you will need a new gasket ($2) and some gasket sealer ($3). I hope this makes sense and helps you.

Should be located in a removable housing at the engine end of the upper radiator hose Drain about 1 gallon of coolant from the radiator

Remove this housing

Make note how thermostat is installed

Clean both surfaces

Replace thermostat and gasket

Re-install housing

Re-fill coolant slowly to prevent an airlock

Start engine and look for leaks

Run engine to normal operating temperature with heater on

Re-check coolant level

Should be located in a removable housing at the engine end of the upper radiator hose Drain about 1 gallon of coolant from the radiator Remove this housing Make note how thermostat is installed Clean both surfaces Replace thermostat and gasket Re-install housing Re-fill coolant slowly to prevent an air lock Start engine and look for leaks Run engine to normal operating temperature with heater on Re-check coolant level
Look at the driver's side of the engine, top. It's a metalic housing with 3 bolts on it. It's attached to your upper radiator hose where it meets the engine.
follolw the top radiator hose to the connection p[oint on the motor, remove that housing,, its under that
Answer There is a top hose and a bottom hose comming out of the radiator. The coolant thermostat wheel be located at where the top hose meets the engine. Here there will be a housing that the hose goes into that is attached to the engine with two bolts. Remove the hose and then unbolt the housing. There you will see the thermostat. Be sure to remove all the old gasket material first before installing a new one. You will proabably have to remove a air box or something to be able to access the housing, but it usually not that difficult. Be sure to drian the coolant first. Good luck.
Follow the top radiator hose down to the water outlet.It is in there. I hope this helps you. Mark

1.05k
Mercury Sable

How do you remove the heater core on a 1986-1995 Taurus -Sable?

I have been struggling with this problem for quite a while and first let me say that to remove and replace the heater core from a 1988 Ford Taurus is not an easy task at all. The basic repair manuals that can be found and purchased at any auto parts store make it sound a whole lot easier than it is. Never the less I never would have gotten to the "core" of the problem without buying one; I purchased one published by HAYNES but if you can find one published by FORD I would expect it to be more specific and helpful.

In order to get to the heater core you must

* disconnect the battery

* disconnect the 2 coolant hoses from the engine compartment side of the firewall

* Disconnect the A/C lines at the firewall (see below)

* Then you must totally disassemble and remove the ENTIRE DASHBOARD

* ** disconnect all electrical connections and gauges from drivers and passengers side

** disconnect column mounting bolts - allow to lay on drivers seat

* Once you have removed the dashboard laying it on the floorboard then you will be able to see and access the plastic heater case cover.

* But here is where the key information is. There are 3 bolts that attach the plastic heater case cover to the engine compartment firewall. These 3 bolts got thru the firewall and are secured with 3 nuts on the engine side.

* ** What the repair manual DOESN'T MENTION is that there are 2 nuts on each of the 3 bolts, one right behind the other!

* I have JUST NOW FINALLY removed the second set of 3 nuts which has given me the ability to remove the plastic cover/case and FINALLY access, remove, and replace the heater core.

Now, putting everything back together the way it is supposed to be is no doubt going to be another major challenge that I'm not looking forward to but I have gotten this far and I am definitely determined to succeed at fixing this problem and getting back.... on the road again!

These connectors requires a special tool to disconnect.

There is a spring up inside the round part of the 'female' end of the fitting - the tool slips over the pipe and the slides up inside to expand the spring, releasing the connection.

Not very expensive and widely available. Amazing but true, in order to change the heater core you must first remove the entire dash. I don't know what they were thinking when they designed this, obviously not about changing the #@!* heater core. You basically have to start at the front of the dash and unhook the instruments from each panel. By the time you get done, everything except the steering column has to be disconnected.

In order to get the dash out, tilt the steering wheel to the lowest position.

The most difficult part, besides keeping track of where everything goes, is removing the 3 nuts that hold the heater to the back of the engine compartment.

Two of the three nuts are almost impossible to see. It took me two hours just to find and remove these three nuts. One is fairly easy to get to, it's near the heater hose connections. The other two you must get at from underneath. One is on the firewall above the catalytic converter, the other is below the power steering pump (depending on year and engine).

Look for the threaded studs sticking through into the engine compartment. They are hard to see and even harder to get to to turn. Good luck. You will need it. Two of the firewall bolts are easy or hard to find, depending on the person i guess cuz our problem is finding the ONE.

We also had to disconnect the steering wheel to get the dash down far enough.

When i find the last bolt, i will tell everyone our findings to the last detail, a picture in words if you will. but, i gotta say, you are by far, the closest answer anyone has come to by answering the notorious *heater core removal* question. to anyone, yes, good luck with it cuz it is a pain to do. and whatever you do It is highly recommended to have it done by a professional. Mine cost over $500 because the entire dash has to be removed to gain access. Do not attempt it's not worth the hassle.I removed my 93 Taurus dash to replace the heater core it's a nightmare rather pay the money and be done with it. Took me 14 hours to strip and re assemble and a lot of cussing. By the way, the reason a heater goes bites the dust is because the coolant hasn't been serviced often enough. Old coolant enables electrolysis and that eats away at the heater core. It is under the center of the dash and the is a cover with four or five hard to reach little bolts that hold it in, also to remove it you have to disconnect the two houses going into from the engine compartment. Be careful when taking off the cover because if it is leaking it will poor nasty stuff all over the inside of car on the floor. AutoFox, sgfox78@yahoo.com If you need the parts or more information email me. There is no short cut or fast way to do this. The dash has to come out to access the heater box and replace the core. So the steps in replacing the heater core are to evacuate the freon out of the AC system, disconnect the heater hoses, disconnect the AC lines and AC drier from the evap core fittings, remove the dash, remove the entire AC/heater box, open the top of the case and replace the core. Reassembly is in the reverse order as disassembly. Recharge the AC system, fill the cooling system with new coolant, and burp the air form the cooling system. I would recommend buying the Sable/Taurus manual, or, do what I did: make copies of those pages from the manual at the library! Only costs about a $1 in the copy machine. The diagrams and directions will make removal a whole bunch easier. The dash has to be loosend or removed to gain access. It can be a real pain if you have never done one. Dont recomment it buy yourself the first time.

Answer

No! Replacing the heater core is never easy.


I have 1990 Ford Taurus that belonged to my husband who passed away. If you look around you will find someone who knows a lot about these cars since there were a lot of them and I have found out that those people are usually really smart about cars and they enjoy talking about them, or like to fix them. :) If they don't respond fast and are not nice blow them off quickly.

Anything can be done if you know how.
I don't know about the heater core but can tell you that 3 mechanics wanted to put in a new fuel pump and it would have cost me 650.00 when all I needed was a new filter and relay system.
The person who helped me works for Autozone. I will ask him about the heater core and let you know what he tells me. == == Go to a FORD dealer, and ask the parts counter person for a CHILTON or HAINES repair manual. Buy it and you will have a complete book on how to repair YOUR vehicle, with step by step photo pages that even tell you what TOOLS you will need to have. This book will save you MONEY, and keep you from making expensive mistakes. The cost should be about $25. There is no short cut or fast way to do this. The dash has to come out to access the heater box and replace the core. So the steps in replacing the heater core are to evacuate the freon out of the AC system, disconnect the heater hoses, disconnect the AC lines and AC drier from the evap core fittings, remove the dash, remove the entire AC/heater box, open the top of the case and replace the core. Reassembly is in the reverse order as disassembly. Recharge the AC system, fill the cooling system with new coolant, and burp the air form the cooling system. Replace heater core

A heater "coil" is much better known as the heater core.

See "Related Questions" below for much much more about Taurus / Sable heatercores...


There is no short cut or fast way to do this. The dash has to come out to access the heater box and replace the core. So the steps in replacing the heater core are to evacuate the freon out of the AC system, disconnect the heater hoses, disconnect the AC lines and AC drier from the evap core fittings, remove the dash, remove the entire AC/heater box, open the top of the case and replace the core. Reassembly is in the reverse order as disassembly. Recharge the AC system, fill the cooling system with new coolant, and burp the air form the cooling system.
This is not an easy thing as the a/c ducts have to come out. Gat a manual from DISCOUNTAUTOREPAIRMANUALS.C0M. It will help acquaint you with your car also.
1k
Ford Taurus
Mercury Sable
Late Model 1979-New Ford Mustangs

Does a Ford Taurus - Mercury Sable have a radiator drain plug?

Yes it does, To access it:

Remove the lower valance panel that runs across the bottom of the frontend of the vehicle from the driver's side to the passenger's side. It is held on with three 8mm bolts and about a dozen 5.5mm screws. After you remove that, then you will see the bottom of the radiator where there is a drain cock on the driver's side. It looks like a plastic bolt and takes a 3/4 wrench to open it. Some models have one that can be twisted open by hand.

There are a dozen tips/tricks/hints in the "Related Question" below for finding and accessing the 1996 and newer Taurus/Sable radiator drain plug / petcock

when looking at the car from the front...it's at the bottom of the radiator on the driver's side.

Flushing and draining the radiator is important maintenance and prevents problems down the road such as clogged heater cores, blown headgaskets, and can help detect, or prevent water pump damage which can cause your vehicle to overheat.

:Buy a one inch hole saw from the hardware store, cost $2.00. Use it on a drill to make an access hole on the driver's side of the air dam underneath the radiator right where the drain plug protrudes down. Then use a socket wrench to turn the plug two turns counter clock-wise. It drains in about 10 minutes. The white drain plug can be seen from the front of the car just over the bumper on the driver's side.

Bill, I have a 1996 Ford Taurus GL and it indeed has a radiator drain plug. However, to drain it, there is a slight catch - (you saw this coming, right?) - you must remove about a gazillion screws and bolts from the "apron" underneath the front of the car and remove said "apron" to reach the drain plug on the driver's side. THEN you must use a socket wrench or hex wrench to open the plug(it's plastic-BE CAREFUL) and drain the radiator(make sure to open the radiator filler cap to relieve the vacuum created). While it's draining, go watch a video or something, it'll be awhile. Closing up the radiator is the reverse of all the above. I wish you luck. - Ted

Yes it has a drain plug but it can jam up if not used. It is far better to take off the bottom hose and point that into a large bucket to catch the coolant. While the coolant in the overflow looks like something from hell, the engine coolant in the radiator, engine block and heater cores looks good when I drained it. I just ran a lot of water through the block and the engine, started it up with the defrost on full for about 2 minutes to push some stuff out, then drained it and poured pure antifreeze in it. There is enough water left in the block to do the dilution....I checked it and got minus 34 so good enough up here

It's a pain in the butt, let me tell ya. There are two vent-type holes in the front of the car. Get a flashlight and look in the driver side one. move some tubes around and you'll see a plastic spigot type thing pointing down at an angle with a plastic knob underneath it. If you're lucky the thing won't be clogged. Attach a piece of tubing to the spigot and turn the knob (if that's not jammed). If it's clogged you're going to have to take the apron off the bottom of the car. On mine i just kept turning the knob and eventually the antifreeze started to come out from around it. It was slow going, but it worked. .

While it is indeed a pain, it only hurts the first time! To drain the radiator fast. Remove the lower cover underneath the front of the car. On the passenger side is a 1-1/4" hose connection. Disconnect here to drain fast. Otherwise, the radiator drain is on the bottom drivers side of the radiator. After carefully marking the location on the lower cover, then removing from the car, I used a hole-saw to cut a 1-1/2" hole directly under this drain plug. Now, I no longer have to remove the cover. A pair of needle nose pliers will reach the plug to unloosen. I also drilled a 1" hole slightly forward of this one for the angled drain. Which I slip a hose on to help direct the antifreeze draining..

It is easiest to pull the lower radiator hose. Be sure to save and dispose of the coolant according to epa instructions. A lot of parts houses will dispose of it for you. GoodluckJoe

The drain is located on the drivers side of the radiator. You have to remove the black apron to get to it. There were three bolts, and then 4 smaller screws holding it to the molding. There is more info here on this subject, as I originally found the answer to my question (which was similar to yours here).

I have a 97 Taurus, pretty much the same car. I have not found it. All I do to empty fluid (or orange water) locate the thermostat and hose the is clamped to it on the right side of the engine. Use some pliers to squeeze the clamp and move down about 3 or 4 inches. Pull hose off of thermostat housing and fold hose downward. Most of the fluid will empty from the radiator. As for the rest of the fluid. You can remove the thermostat housing and put water hose in the reservoir until clear water comes out of engine at housing that was just removed. When you reinstall, make sure you have a new gasket or you will have a leak, and use gasket glue to secure a tight fit. Make sure you clean out fluid frequently because the dirty water clogs your heater core and then you will have a large head ache.

Under the front of the sable is a water/dirt shield made of a plastic material that is bolted on with 4mm bolts ( about 8 )... there is also a single ( up to 3 ) 8mm bolt at the back of the shield that all need to be removed ( very easily done ) then remove the shield and you will see the bottom of the radiator assembly on the driver side of the car with a cream colored petcock valve and the outlet all pointing straight down. Open the fluid reservoir to help the discharge rate once you open the petcock.

There is a plastic protective panel/shroud you need to remove under the front end (some real tiny bolts near the bumper and three larger ones towards the engine) and you will see the draincock on the driver's side end of the radiator on the bottom (it's vertical, not horizontal). Recommend you cut a 2" x 2" hole in the panel for future access.

There is a piece of black trim under the front bumper that is attached with 4 Phillips screws, 5 or 6 5.5 mm screws and 3 or 4 8 mm screws . The trim piece, or cover, is over a foot wide and runs the entire width of the car. Remove the screws and bolts and you can access the drain petcock on the right hand (driver) side of the radiator . 19 mm head on the drain, which is an off-white plastic hex head on the underside of the radiator. (Note: some are attached with 5 7/32" head screws and 3 8mm head bolts. No Phillips screws at all.)

Remove the lower valance panel that runs across the bottom of the front end of the vehicle from the driver's side to the passenger's side. It is held on with three 8mm bolts and about a dozen 7/32 screws. After you remove that, then you will see the bottom of the radiator where there is a drain cock on the driver's side. It looks like a plastic bolt and takes a 3/4 wrench to open it.

Should be drain plug at lower radiator either at bottom or at rear may be hidden be lower hose or just remove lower hose

if i remember correctly its in the bottom of the radiator the under engine cover is in the way

:Yes, In order to access it you must first remove the air dam which is held to the bumper (on 1996-99's) by 5.5MM bolts and 3 SAE bolts (cannot remember the size. Will edit when i get it.) Once the lower air dam is removed the petcock can be seen, it simply unscrews to the left and drains out a spout.

Either at the bottom or rear of radiator

Drain radiator at bottom or rear of same

Remove the lower valance panel that runs across the bottom of the frontend of the vehicle from the driver's side to the passenger's side. It is held on with three 8mm bolts and about a dozen 5.5mm screws. After you remove that, then you will see the bottom of the radiator where there is a drain cock on the driver's side. It looks like a plastic bolt and takes a 3/4 wrench to open it. Some models have one that can be twisted open by hand.

There are a dozen tips/tricks/hints in the "Related Question" below for finding and accessing the 1996 and newer Taurus/Sable radiator drain plug / petcock

when looking at the car from the front...it's at the bottom of the radiator on the driver's side.

See "Related Questions" below for more

The radiator drain plug for a 2001 Taurus is located underneath the car on the bottom of the radiator on the driver side of the car. It is very hard to see and get to. You must first remove the plastic cover that is attached to your front bumper. Take it completely off, then look underneath the car on the driver side. On the bottom of the radiator you should notice a white plastic nut. It is easily removed with a 9/16 wrench.

This was a great answer and saved me a lot of time. The only difference was that on my 2001 Taurus SES with 3.0 Flex Fuel Engine was that the white plastic nut took a 3/4 wrench. Also, the plastic cover that's attached to the front bumper is also attached to the plastic fender wells with one screw per fender.

It is located at the bottom of the radiator on the driver's side of the vehicle. If you look straight up from the ground under the front of the car, you will see a black plastic panel that spans the distance form one side of the car to the other. This panel can be removed for easier access to the radiator petcock. The panel is held on with approximately eight to ten 7/32 (very small) screws, and three 5/16ths bolts. This car's petcock is not a wingnut type, but is plastic and in the shape of a bolt head, and will require a 3/4 inch wrench to loosen.

I would suggest you take it to a auto shop and have a flush done as draining the radiator really does little for you. There is still a large amount of the coolant in the engine and in the heater core that does not get changed and will contaminate your new coolant as soon as your thermostat opens. Also draining the radiator does not remove very much of the deposits that are built up in the system.

Check at the bottom of radiator perhaps under lower hose

See "Related Questions" below for more

The radiator drain plug for a 2001 Taurus is located underneath the car on the bottom of the radiator on the driver side of the car. It is very hard to see and get to. You must first remove the plastic cover that is attached to your front bumper. Take it completely off, then look underneath the car on the driver side. On the bottom of the radiator you should notice a white plastic nut. It is easily removed with a 9/16 wrench.

This was a great answer and saved me a lot of time. The only difference was that on my 2001 Taurus SES with 3.0 Flex Fuel Engine was that the white plastic nut took a 3/4 wrench. Also, the plastic cover that's attached to the front bumper is also attached to the plastic fender wells with one screw per fender.

It is located at the bottom of the radiator on the driver's side of the vehicle. If you look straight up from the ground under the front of the car, you will see a black plastic panel that spans the distance form one side of the car to the other. This panel can be removed for easier access to the radiator petcock. The panel is held on with approximately eight to ten 7/32 (very small) screws, and three 5/16ths bolts. This car's petcock is not a wingnut type, but is plastic and in the shape of a bolt head, and will require a 3/4 inch wrench to loosen.

I would suggest you take it to a auto shop and have a flush done as draining the radiator really does little for you. There is still a large amount of the coolant in the engine and in the heater core that does not get changed and will contaminate your new coolant as soon as your thermostat opens. Also draining the radiator does not remove very much of the deposits that are built up in the system.

829830831
Ford Taurus
Mercury Sable

How do you remove a door panel on a Ford Taurus - Mercury Sable?

Removing the Door Panel
  1. Remove triangle-shaped plastic cover forward of door window (speaker cover on some models) - gently pry it off
  2. Remove screw from the plastic cover behind door open lever / handle
  3. Remove door lock plunger. (unscrew)
  4. Remove screws down inside the door pull hand-hold area
  5. Look for other Phillips screws, 2 or 3, around the lower 1/2 of the panel
  6. Pry hidden plastic hold down fasteners from around the edge - pull the panel away from the door and where you see it 'stuck' to the door, slide a pry tool, a stiff putty knife works well, up in that area and pop the fastener off.
Answerremove the 2 screws from the door handle and then just pull the panel, it has plastic clips inside that you just push back in to lock. AnswerFirst remove all the screws on the door panel. Then take a big screwdriver or door puller and start at the bottom and pop the 10 clips along the bottom and sides of the door. Lift the door panel up and over the handle and door lock and the top clips should come off also. Be careful as there may be wires attached to the door panel for windows and door lights. AnswerThe door panel is simply held on by some plastic clips that pop in or out of place. Remove the two black screws that hold on the panel (one on the left edge, one on the right edge. Then remove the screw at the bottom of the place where your fingers go when you close the dorr from the inside, then remove the piece of plastic trim that goes around the inside door handle. This pops out from the top of the trim piece, not the bottom. A small flathead screwdriver is all that is needed to pry up the top portion of the trim piece.

After the three screws and th trim piece is removed, you can pull gently from one of the lower corners to release the first plastic snap, just work your way around the panel till all the clips have been released.

The electrical connectors come off by pushing the small button on the top of the electrical connector then pulling on the connector to remove it from the base while pushing the button down.

AnswerIt is suggested that you first disconnect the negative battery cable.

Then look around and you will see some screws... anywhere from five to seven of them. Remove those.

There are five plastic push pins (from 2000 and on) that need to be pried loose. Use a flat pry bar and start at the bottom and pry the panel away from the door. The male part of the pin will stay with the panel, and the female part will stay in the door. Move slowly around the door and take your time. You may have to pry harder than you might expect. Be careful, as plastic gets old and brittle with time.

Disconnect the electrical connectors, and you're done.

It's pretty easy. There are 6 (if I recall) screws. Just get them out and then use a small pry bar (or butter knife) and work your way around popping out the hidden plastic fasteners. Start at the bottom right side of the panel. Don't be afraid to give it a yank.

After this is done, just lift up to release it at the top. There are two electrical connectors to unhook once the panel is loose. Install in reverse order, beginning with top first.

goto your local library and find a manual. It will show you where all the clips and screws are. After that you just have to pop the clips off gently but firmly so you minimize damage to them.

Answerhey i just dismantled my door panel for my 97 Ford Taurus because i have to change my window motor. It pops right off,it's only being conected by plastic fasteners and if you ruin any of the fasteners you can buy them at an auto part store.You can just use a flat head screwdriver, put it in between the panel and the actual door and push forward or towards you and it should pop right off

Get a flathead screw driver and a cloth. Cover the screwdriver with the cloth, and gently go around the outside of the panel, insert the screwdriver behind the panel and gently pop out the retaing clips. The plastic clips do brek easy so you have to be as firm, yet careful as you can.

Answerbelieve it or not, they just pop off. they are held on by ittle plastic buggers that look like screws. make sure to unscrew everywhere that has one, then it just pops right off. be careful, the plastic holders are easy to snap and strip.
793794795
Brake Pads and Rotors
Mercury Sable
Honda Accord LX

How do you change rear brakes and compress piston on a Mercury Sable?

See "Related Links" below, for Autozone's on-line repair manual for 1996-1999 Taurus & Sable rear brake repair instructions.

Invaluable resource - for free! Okay, I did my disc brakes yesterday and offer the following: * The first 2 steps in the Autozone steps are about disconnecting the emergency brake cable - this is not necessary! On the driver's side, you might want to remove the cable clamp holding the cable up against the frame. * NOTE: the piston needs to rotate as it is compressed!There are notches in the face of the piston that are intended to help create both rotation and inward pressure.

Get a caliper piston compression tool! Many parts stores offer them for loan or rent. You definitely want one! (I fabricated my own from plumbing parts - didn't have a car available to go back to the parts store) * To compress the piston, follow these steps- : :# Remove the caliper and bracket :# Remove the rotor :# Put the bracket and caliper back on (don't bother really tightening the bolts) :# Put a c-clamp on that holds the caliper to the bracket - one end over the one of the caliper mounting bolts. : Now you can put lots of pressure up against the piston with the compression tool with both hands! Much easier. * Make sure the slide bolts on the caliper are moving freely. One of mine was rusted in place - took lots of heat, penetrating oil and patience to get it loose. : NOTE - be sure to peel off the rubber boot before you fire up the propane torch! : Wire brush the bolt and re-grease the whole thing under the rubber boot. * I found rotors for only $18 each and just replaced both. I haven't had rotors turned/re-surfaced in years. Easier to just put new ones on. * I love ceramic brake pads! I really appreciate the total lack of brake dust all over my wheels! Typically around $40-45, so their not much more than the metallics. I replaced the brake pads on my mom's 93 Taurus and the rear pads required a special tool to collapse the caliper. My brother is a technician for Ford and I used his tool that cost 75 dollars.

You cant use a C clamp - it won't work.

The trick is that the piston has to rotate and essentially screw itself back into the caliper.

There are two notches in the face of the piston that a 'special' tool fits into to help you rotate it while pushing in.

Late one Sunday afternoon was when I discovered this - no stores to get the 'right' tool from. I actually fabricated one out of a piece of galvanized pipe connector -and lots of grinding. Crude, but functional.

Many parts stores have a tool loaner option. You may even find this tool at affordable prices if you check around. You need a special tool available for rent at some parts stores. They should be able to tell you how to use it. The trick is that the piston has to rotate and essentially screw itself back into the caliper.

There are two notches in the face of the piston that a 'special' tool fits into to help you rotate it while pushing in.

Late one Sunday afternoon was when I discovered this - no stores to get the 'right' tool from. I actually fabricated one out of a piece of galvanized pipe connector -and lots of grinding. Crude, but functional. Rear disc brakes on Sables are more complicated then front brakes. If the rear brake unit has the parking brake attached to the side with a circular spring, then the rear brakes cannot be pressed back into place like the front ones. There is a brake tool needed to rotate the cylinder back into place. if your caliper piston is not depressing easily, it may be siezed. this is common in most vehicles with rear disc brakes Should I be depressing the piston as I am turning clockwise? Hal This is one of the worst, most arm wrenching jobs going. You need a gold 'cube' brake tool, available from most auto supply stores. You use a ratchet to hold the tool and compress the piston as you twist. It can take hours - as the cube will continually slip off (watch your hands). Supposedly if you open the bleeder valve it will just twist right in, spewing brake fluid everywhere. Never tried that. I did it once, and on the other side, I just simply replaced the caliper to avoid the pain and suffering. Use a big C-clamp. This will force fluid back up into the reservoir. Some will spill out if you have recently filled it. Clean up ASAP. If you are trying to change rear disc brakes on a 93 mercury sable, you will need a caliper removal tool set. You will find a small square type tool at auto parts stores that cost around $10 but these will not fit properly when trying to relieve the pressure so DO NOT purchase for a 1993 - the slots are not wide enough. Go to an auto parts store that offers a tool loan program (I went to A.Z.) and ask for the disc caliper removal set - you will have to leave a deposit. The one I got came in a red plastic case and there were around 6 or so round metal discs inside, each with differing widths for different models, a clamp used to turn the metal discs and a piece of metal shaped the same way as the brake pads. I cannot remember exactly how they worked now but once you get the CORRECT tool you should understand from there. you have to turn the piston clockwise into the caliper. you can buy this cube-thing or use needle nose pliers.

Answer

They are threaded to operate emeergency brake need special tool (available at Sears or auto parts) not expensive

BFG is correct...They twist back in. The tool looks like a square box with little bumps in different places for different cars and has a square hole in the middle for your extenion and ratchet.




you need what is normally called a 'rear disk break calaper tool' which is used to turn the calaper piston back into the calaper, it is turned in like a bolt. you can either get the ford specific tool or try to find a general purpose tool designed for many makes and models. i have found the generic one to be cheaper and it did do the trick, they can be tricky to reset back into the calaper and it does help if you crack the bleader screw (keep a can ready for the old fluid) and make sure you bleed the breaks afterwards
697698699
Mercury
Mercury Sable

Why do the door ajar light and dome lights stay on or come on while driving in a Sable?

3 Step Cleaning & LubeThis is a common problem and is caused by the door switch plunger sticking (due to dirt, other elements or rust). This can often be corrected by performing the following:

1. Thoroughly spray the door switches (on each door) with:

  • Cleaning spray - clear the sludge out of the mechanism - electronic contact cleaner, carb, brake, etc
  • Air, canned or even better, from a compressor
  • Spray lubricant - a dry lube (best), silicone spray, WD-40 or similar

2. Open and close each door several times to work the lube into the mechanism

This is usually sufficient to clean the electrical & plunger mechanism inside the door switch.

If this doesn't work, you could remove the door panel and do the spray treatment from the inside also.

This approach works for most, but the switch may have to come out for repair (see Windstar "Related Question" below), or replacement.

Answercar has roller switch to the right of the headlight switch turn until dash lights are on car usually has maybe 1-2minute delay till they turn off or one of your doors is not properly closing AnswerI just bought a 1998 Ford Taurus SE and right away I noticed the Dome light wasn't even coming on. The 2 map lights did work. I asked the previous owner about it, but he had no idea. Today I bought a new bulb and noticed that the light stays on forever, and the door ajar icon stays lit. I read through some of the responded posted for the problem, so I tried the WD-40 idea and it fixed it in 30 seconds. What you need to do is spray light lubricant (WD-40) on the drivers door latch. This is right at the end of the door (where is swings away from the car). You'll see the latch looks like plastic. Give it a few sprays, then open and close the door several times. If it works, the light should go off in about 30 seconds, and the door ajar light will go out. What must be happening is that the door closes, but something is sticking, not allowing the switch in the door to close. Spraying on the lubricant loosens this up, and in my case fixed it right away. Hope this helps. Regards, Doug AnswerSee "Related Questions" below for moreAnswerThe door ajar switch is attached, between the exterior door panel and the interior door trim. The only way to get to the hinge is to remove the iinterior door trim panel and follow the electrical harness to the switch. This is not an easy item to replace unless you remove the entire door latching mechanism. AnswerThe door ajar sensor is located inside the door panel, a pain to get at but Ford knows about the problem and a quick call to the parts department at a dealer can get you the part you need. I did my Mercery in about 2 hours. I do recommend getting some door panel posts if you are at the dealership though, I broke two off getting the panel undone. AnswerThis switch is inside the door itself. you'll need to remove the inner door panel to replace the switch. Sometimes if you spray a good lubricant inside the door through the door handle that may lubricate the switch so it doesn't stick. AnswerThe "door open" sensors are located by the door locking mechanism. Open the door, spray some WD-40 on and into the door latch, work it open and closed with a screwdriver while releasing the latch with the inside door handle. Do this to all the doors and your sensors should be operating normal once again.

When your sensors think your door and/or doors are open, your electric locks will not work properly and your dome light will not go out.

I'm not positive about the 2001, but I had a problem with my '98 always having the door ajar light on. I found an article online that said to spray same lubricant (WD40 or liquid wrench) into the lock mechanism at the end of the door (not where you put the key in, but the latch itself). I tried this with some WD40 and the problem disappeared immediately. Apparently the switch is built into the latch.

AnswerWE often find that dirt gets into the door ajar switches. To free them up, we spray penetrating oil directly into each door latch until it is practically running out the bottom of the dor, and then open and close the door repeatedly and rapidly. This may take care of your problem. AnswerCould be one of two things. Check the hinges on all doors for a small plastic bracket that might've slipped off, it could be causing the door to not shut properly.

Second thing to do is get a can of WD-40 and liberally spray each doors' lock mechanism liberally, then close and open each door several times afterwards. One of these tricks should fix the problem.

I had the same problem. found this solution after I had removed a door panel, shorted the switch wiring harness, replaced the relay, and read in my Chilton shop manual that has incomplete schematics, all to no avail. I then sprayed WD-40 into all the locks, opened and closed the doors a few times, and the door ajar light went out. The drivers side door ajar switch is located above the actual lock mechanism on the inside of the door, so I made sure to spray up into each of the locks.

Try the dimmer switch under the steering wheel on the left. Sometimes it clicks on and you don't know it.

AnswerDo they go off after a few seconds? You may have a security system in your vehicle. Do they go off when you put the vehicle in gear? If so then it is a security system. AnswerDoor switch if button type not adjusted properly or defective

If located in the latch assembly - try spraying latch liberally with WD-40 open and close door a few times and then spray with a silicone - common problem for Lincoln - may be same situation

AnswerYou really need to know which door switch is bad. It could be any of your 4 doors. It doesn't have to be the driver's door. The only way to find out which door, without tearing all the door panels off and disconnecting them all, is to talk to the GEM module with a scan tool and find out which switch is indicating the door is open. There is another step you can take fairly easily that may or may not fix your problem. Sometimes the switches don't actually go bad. They get dirt in them, that causes them to stick. Get some penetrating oil, like WD40. The switches are on the backs of the door latch assemblies inside of the doors. Spray a whole bunch of WD40 up inside the latch itself. I mean drown it until oil starts running out underneath. Then open and close the door rapidly numerous times. Do all the doors, and see if the problem goes away. We fix a lot of them that way.

You have a stuck door ajar switch. You won't be able to tell which one it is, but usually it's the driver's since that one gets the most wear. You may be able to unstick it yourself. Get some penetrating oil, go around to each door, open it, spray penetrating oil directly into the door latch until it just about runs out the bottom of the door. Then rapidly open and close the door several times. that may fix your problem. If not, then you will need a new door latch switch on one of the doors, but without special equipment, yopu will not be able to determine which door it is.

I have had the same issue with my 98 Sable and it appears to be something sticking in the door lock area. I have used a good spray grease (one that comes out as liquid spray, but then turns to grease) to shoot the actual lock mechanism itself. I squirt it in just about every crevice you can see, don't overdue it by any means, a little goes a long way, then work the door by opening closing it 8 to 10 times. You can do this to all of the doors, but mine tends to be the driver door, but I only know that simply because I usually don't have passengers.

There could be other issues of course, but this is a very cheap and easy fix if it works for you as well.

19JAN2010

Wow! What a great web site! Tonight my wife came home from work with our 1999 Mercury Sable and when she locked the car with the wireless control the two map lights and the red door ajar light stayed on and the horn honked twice indicating that the car was not "secure". I d/c'ed the battery so it wouldn't go dead and browsed on the internet for a solution to the problem. I immediately found ANSWERS.COM and the above information from the other participants and applied their advice. In less than an hour of work the lights went out and the horn honked only once indicating that the car was in fact now secure. The bottom line is: The WD40 solved the issue when I sprayed it on all four door latch mechanisms and also immediately above them where I could feel the lock solenoid operating when the wireless door lock button was pushed. Thank all of you fine gentlemen AND Anwers.com.

647648649
Mercury Sable
Mitsubishi
Ford Taurus
Check Engine Light

What causes the check engine light to come on and how to read the trouble codes in a Taurus - Sable?

The check engine light (CEL for short) is triggered when one or more of the many sensors on the vehicle detects a not-normalreading,

There are 2 basic steps to determining the cause of the CEL coming on:

  1. Have the codes read - many places offer to read the engine codes for free. Autozone even provides a printout of the codes, and a short description of common causes
  2. Research those codes! Find out the true cause and reason for the not-normal reading. It is not often that the sensor itself is bad and requires replacing.

    There are countless sources of information on engine DTC (diagnostic trouble codes) on the internet - including WikiAnswers!

Real-life examples:

  • DTC code P0402 on 98 Tracer - replaced the EGR valve, light came back. Made my daughter live with it for 2 years. Yesterday I had a few minutes while waiting for the oil to drain and poked around the engine - found a small 2" piece of rubber hose that had softened and collapsed right where the PCV connects. A free piece of hose from Autozone and the light cleared after a few drive cycles!
  • Major auto parts chain told me my TSP (Throttle position sensor) was bad due to the CEL being lit up (might have been a P1120 DTC). $40 and 10 minutes to replace - ((_#*&$ light came right back. A few days ago, after doing some reading, I bought a $4 can of throttle body spray cleaner - used 1/2 the can on my 98 Sable - voila! CEL is gone again!

Pay attention to those check engine lights - they're there for a reason. And with the internet today, you can readily find the information to keep your car healthy, and even save some $$ in the process.

(end of editorial rant,... and no more acronyms!)

NOTE:This light has 2 other names it is referred to:
  • Service Engine Soon - SES
  • Malfunction Indicator Lamp - MIL
AnswerYour owner's manual will tell you. It more than likely means it is time to change the oil. It can also mean there is a problem with the emissions controls, depending on what term Ford uses. AnswerIf your car is a year 96 or newer, this usually means there is a problem with your emissions system. This light will also detect a problem with your transmission, as some transmission problems will in some way affect gas efficiency, therefore affecting emissions (i.e. problems with overdrive performance) I know, I'm having this problem now. I have a 97 Mercury Sable. AnswerCHECK FOR VACUUM LEAKS! Everytime my engine light comes on, I get it checked at Autozone and they always tell me its a vacuum leak. I then have to manually search for a "sssss" sound on every vacuum line and replace the hose. The first time this happened, I found a huge hole in the hose next to my PCV valve, causing that to clog. I would recommend checking there first.

You need to have it scanned,most of smaller repair shops will do it a reasonable price,and give you the trouble code.

Check engine light staying onYou need to go to a reputable shop and have them test the vehicle. They will use a scan tool to check for codes, then they will have an idea what system is causing the light to come on.

Just finding out the code doesn't tell what's wrong, so it may not be worth trying to buy a cheap "code reader". Find a shop you trust and take the vehicle to a professional.

AnswerThe scanner / code readers are very inexpensive now - I've seen them as low as $30. Autozone & Harbor Freight are just 2 places to look.

BEWARE - the parts stores are very happy to tell you the DTC code (Diagnostic trouble code), and then encourage you to buy the cited part.

For example, a P0171 or P0174 indicate an oxygen sensor issue - will buying and replacing the O2 sensor FIX the problem? NOT AT ALL LIKELY. Don't just blindly buy the part - been there, done that.

Get the codes read - then research them on the net or talk to a reliable mechanic.

Its the emissions light. On my mercury sable when I get bad gasoline the light tends to go on. Usually if I run the car almost empty and then fill up again it goes out. If not try disconecting the battery.

It could be one, more, or MANY things. That's why it is suggested that you take it to your dealer if it is still under warranty. You can take it to AutoZone and have your "Codes" (what causes the Check Engine Light or "SES" Service engine soon light) read.

It will usually tell you what caused the SES and it should be fairly simple to fix, such as a malfunctioning O2 Sensor.

Some things however can be very complex and it is recommended an AST Certified Mechanic takes a look at the vehicle.

most likely a severe engine misfire. you need to have it checked for codes

AnswerIt simply means that the engines computer is picking up a a problem from one of the sensors on the vehicles All of the sensors work together and feed their information to the Engines Computer (or ECU). The main reason for all of these sensors is to accomplish maximun fuel economy while buring as clean as possible thus keeping pollution and emissions to a minimal. AnswerThe light is on because the computer has detected a problem with the emissions system. This may be nothing more than a loose gas cap, or as serious as a bad catalytic converter. Have the computer scanned for fault codes. This will help to find the problem. After the problem is corrected the light can be reset with an OBD2 scan tool. AnswerPull the codes from the computer, match the code to the troubleshooting procedure, follow the procedure to find the source. Repair the source, light will go out if that was the only problem. There are "monitors" or self test the computer runs the car through, if a problem occurs, it may not run all of the self tests until that problem is taken care. Therefore, another problem may exist. It is emission related. See "Related Questions" below for moreAnswer

Open and read your owner's manual. There you will find the answer to your question. But I will tell you. The computer has detected a fault with the emissions system.

Answer

Pull the codes from the computer, match the code to the troubleshooting procedure, follow the procedure to find the source. Repair the source, light will go out if that was the only problem. There are "monitors" or self tests the computer runs the car through a drive cycle, if a problem occurs, it may not run all of the self tests until that problem is taken care. Therefore, another problem may exist. It is emission related. OR hook up a scanner that is capable of clearing codes, and hope that none are still active.

The " check engine light" is by far one of the most misunderstood technological advances by the public. I am sure I will revise this as time goes on, as it is an in-depth understanding for the public. It is a warning light that is illuminated when there is a problem with the EMISSION SYSTEM only. Emission system being the pollution control system. Don't get a hard on against it as it is a good thing once you understand it. One point that was brought up a a recent meeting of technicians was that the amount of hydrocarbons is greater when the gas cap is left off than when the engine is running. Hydrocarbons are part of pollution emitted as gasoline evaporates. Going a step farther, one facet of the emission system is the "Evaporative" portion. This is when the fumes from the gasoline are leaking from the system into the outside air. This is one part of the emission system that can trigger a check engine light. I would say that about 7% of the vehicles that have a check engine light are the result of a loose or inadequate gas cap. But understand that many scenarios are possible with the "check engine light" The vehicle's powertrain computer (note that some vehicles have 17 different computers) will run a series of self-tests. They will only run under certain criteria. And they can be vastly different from manufacturer to manufacturer. Some self-tests are not run until preceding ones have run successfully. So if there is a problem in one particular area that is preventing another self test from running, you can have a situation where one problem is fixed, but another still exists. If you fix a problem and drive the car through a drive cycle that sets the monitor (or self test) the light will go off as it passes that criteria that triggered it in the first place. After 1996, the auto industry went to a idea called OBD II (on board diagnostics). This was to get all the manufacturers onto a similar plane for troubleshooting and powertrain control. While they still differ vastly, many corrections and adaptations were made for technicians to better fix the check engine light problems. Prior to this there were so many different and poor troubleshooting data from a check engine light problem that resolving the problem was much more difficult. Many early warning light of this nature were set to illuminate based on mileage. An Oxygen sensor was one of the things that were meant to be replaced when that mileage was hit. This is much like many current "Change oil lights� that are set based on a pre-set mileage.

AnswerIt will be impossible to give you any better than a broad answer here, because there are literally hundreds of possibilities as to why a check engine light(CEL) comes on. The system would have to be scanned to retrieve whatever fail codes there are. Then we would use a manual (that is literally 3 inches thick)that contains flow charts with pinpoint tests, using a voltmeter, to hand diagnose, and find out what is wrong. This process can take a few minutes, it may take a couple of hours, depending on what is actually wrong.

Now here is the "why" of a CEL: What is actually turning on the CEL is the Powertrain Control Module(PCM), commonly known as the engine control computer. Inside of a PCM there are actually two separate systems. One is control, the other system is diagnostics. PCM diagnostics acts as "big brother," constantly looking over the shoulder of the control side of the PCM. Diagnostics is constantly monitering systems to see if the expected voltages and values are present. For example: If the PCM diagnostics knows that it has been so many minutes since the engine was first started, then the engine temperature should be around 195 degrees. In our senerio, if the engine is still 160 degrees, it sees a problem, and sets the CEL. The technician has to use pinpoint diagnostics to see if we have a stuck thermostat, if the Engine Coolant Temp(ECT) sensor if sending a false signal, if the wiring between the ECT and the PCM is bad, or if the PCM is faulty and interpreting the signal received from the ECT incorrectly. But the PCM is not capable of monitering everything all at once, so it basically goes down a checklist, over and over again, as you are driving down the road. Sometimes a problem can come and go intermittantly, at the right times so as to avoid detection by the PCM. That is why sometimes a CEL doesn't always come on everytime there is a problem. Sometimes you can unplug a sensor even while the car is running, and it takes a while for the CEL to come on, just because the PCM diagnostics hasen't gotten back around to looking at that area yet.

Our senerio only talked about one area that a PCM moniters. There are dozens of sub-systems that the PCM looks at, and dozens of possible failures within each of those sub-systems, that could cause a CEL.

Most often the cause of this light staying on is a bad EGR valve or a bad O2 sensor.

Y-THINK-Y

Answeryou might want to check your gas cap if it is loose it can trigger your check engine light
640641642
Ford Taurus
Mercury Sable

How do you fix a Taurus - Sable that is stuck in park?

Trick to get it out of park: Just turn key to ON position, put car in neutral, then start car.

I have had the exact same problem with a '94 Taurus. For me, the linkage had to be replaced. The linkage is the mechanism that connects the shift lever to the transmission.

Brake-shift interlock

This vehicle is equipped with a brake-shift interlock feature that prevents the gearshift from being moved from P (Park) unless the brake pedal is depressed.

If you cannot move the gearshift out of P (Park) with the brake pedal depressed:

1. Apply the parking brake, turn ignition key to LOCK, then remove the key.

2. Insert the key and turn it to OFF. Apply the brake pedal and shift to N (Neutral).

3. Start the vehicle.

If it is necessary to use the above procedure to move the gearshift, it is possible that a fuse has blown or the vehicle's brakelamps are not operating properly. Refer to Fuses and relays in the Roadside emergencies

It is probably like my 1998. There is a safety that won't let you shift unless the brake pedal is depressed. The same fuse for the brake lights is for the safety. If the fuse is good you might have to replace the safety that is connected above the brake pedal. You can usually override it by shifting while the car if off and key in accessory position.

If you have a console standard shift the push button on the shifter may not be releasing totally (specially if you have oem leather on it restricting its movement). Pry it loose. If not it might be your stop light switch if all your brake lights are not working.

There is a safety on the car that won't let you shift out of park unless the brake pedal is depressed. The fuse for the brake lights is the same one for that safety. Check to see if the fuse is good. If it is, then you might need to replace the safety that is connected above the brake pedal. Having the car off and key in axillary is overriding the safety. If you have the car owners manual it is described in there.

usually there is a lockout override (you can't shift out of park without the brake on), it will be a access in the console near the shifter, sometimes a slider or removable button that you can stick a key into to release the lock. check brakelight system, it usually powers the automatic release

check to see if you have brake lights. The brake light switch also sends power to the shifter lockout solenoid. Ususally the wiring at the connector to the brake light switch developes a break due to the constant movement of the brake pedal. If that happens or the brake light switch goes bad, or even if the fuse to the brake lights blows, you will be stuck in park.

The Break On/Off (BOO) switch has caused this problem for me. It's the only way that the rest of the car knows that you're pressing your brakes, thusly not letting you shift or triggering your brake lights when it is loose.

I've rather big feet, so I've kicked it loose several times since it first happened. It's a cheap little plastic connector on the brake pedal itself.

# Follow the pedal up to the wiring.

# Ensure that everything is plugged in properly.

# If the BOO switch is plugged in and the problem is still present, then is the time to check the fuse box according to the manual.

If you've never checked fuses for proper functioning, all you do is hold them up to the light to see that the connection is not broken within the fuse (ie, that the fuse is "blown")

631632633
Ford Taurus
Mercury Sable
Turn Signals and Hazard Lights

Where is the flasher located on a 1996-1999 Taurus - Sable?

What does it look like and where's it mountedThe flasher/turn signal is screwed into the metal support above the fuse panel, you must take the bottom of the dash off and remove the plastic cover. this is for a sable that has light out detection.

Look under your dash for a blue box screwed into the right side of the dash panel. This of course is done, with you laying on your back, and your feet in the back seat.

It's a blue box, about the size of half a twinkie (cream filled, golden sponge cake).

Remove the plug that holds it in, unscrew the screw that holds it to the frame, and go to Autozone or other parts store, to get a new relay.

You will have to reuse the metal piece that holds the relay to the dash panel, so be sure and save that before you throw the old part away.

Installation is the reverse.

First Squirt easing oil, No Kidding!Don't even try until you lubricate the "multifunction switch" behind the steering wheel, which usually causes this problem. Squirt easing oil into the hole where the Hazard switch sits. Be generous. Operate the switch repeatedly. Operate the turn-signal switch repeatedly. Add more easing oil if needed. If that doesn't work, get a replacement flasher from your local auto parts store for about $10 (or pay $40-50 at the Ford parts window). Look up under the dash to the left of the steering wheel for a blue plastic cube. Remove that and plug the replacement in. The easing oil trick worked for me!No kidding. It worked like a charm. I highly suggest trying it before you do anything else. easing oil also fixed my dome light switches. My Dome lights wouldn't turn off but after saturating the door latches on each door, the switches started working again. Fixing a Flasher on a 1996 Ford TaurusThe flasher (a single one for both turn signals and the hazard lights) is close under the dash left of the steering column. Original equipment is a blue plastic square that fits into a three-pole receptacle served by black, blue, and red-white wires.

But don't rush to replace it yet. First, do what my friend learned to do from WikiAnswers -- squirt easing oil down around the Hazard switch button behind the steering wheel, where the "multi-function switch" is located. Be generous with the lubricant. Soak the switch good. Work the hazard switch on and off a dozen times. Then work the turn signal switch right and left a dozen times. If nothing improves, let it sit a few minutes, then try the flashers again. Add more easing oil.

If you have to give up on easing oil, check the fuses for the hazard and the turn signals lights (separate fuses). If they're good, remove the flasher and replace it ($10 at your friendly universal after-market parts store, ($40-50 at your local Ford dealer). Save the receipt so you can return the flasher for a refund, as my friend did after easing oil did the trick.

TestimonialHoly Cow! I just happened to be stuck with my wife's Grandfather's 96 Taurus today and the turn signals and flashers didn't work. I followed the overly simple procedure in the preceding two paragraphs and it worked like a charm. Suhweeet! AnswerThe manual I have says the flasher assembly is under the drivers side of the instrument panel and it is held in by one retaining screw. It shows a small square unit with three blades which plug into a connector on the end of wire. It appears to be screwed into an under dash brace member which supports the instrument panel. My flasher is failing intermittently. I haven't gotten around to replacing it yet, so I can't guarantee this description is accurate. I hope this information helps. AnswerIndicator flasher assy 13550. This is an electronic combination turn signal and emergency warning flasher. It is attached on the left hand side of the instrument panel reinforcement above the fuse panel. The main wiring harness is assy 14401. AnswerIt could be the flasher, another fuse, the turn signal switch or an electrical connector. You will need to get a schematic for the turn signal system then track back to where you get power. Follow the line to the point where you no longer get power they you will have found the source of the problem. AnswerThe Flasher Relay is located behind the left side of the instrument panel.

There is no flasher on the 98 Sable, it has a LCM (Lighting Control Module) Dealer only item unless you wanna take a chance at the junk yard.

there is a light blue flasher relay under the steering wheel check and replace or check the fuse box in the same place

The flasher/turn signal is screwed into the metal support above the fuse panel, you must take the bottom of the dash off and remove the plastic cover. this is for a sable that has light out detection. Any questions, contact chrisvolkswagon@msn.com I know for Real. Look under your dash. Look for a Blue Box screwed into the right side of the dash panel. This of course is done, with you laying on your back, and your feet in the back seat. It sucks to get to, but it's the easiest to access once your under there. It's a blue box, about the size of half a twinkie. Remove the plug that holds it in, unscrew the screw that holds it to the frame, and go to Autozone to get a new relay. You will have to reuse the metal piece that holds the relay to the dash panel, so be sure and save that before you throw the old part away. Installation is the reverse. Be sure to read through the Related Question below on the Taurus - great tips & info that equally applies to the Sable. Flasher relay is located, behind left side of instrument panel. The Flasher sensor looks like a little aluminum can, and is located under the dash (provided they didn't include a dash cover) otherwise you'd have to unscrew it first from all it's mounting screws. The can is mounted on the steering column up a ways, (best way to see is to put your head up there, while your feet rest in the backseat, it's uncomfortable but it works. You'll see two cans, left/right, turn your key to the "on" position, and use the turn signals, and feel each can for a clicking feel/sound. Don't replace that one, unless you don't have turn signals either. Henceforth the other one is the Hazard/Flasher sensor. Pull out the wire clip (it's easier if you slide the can out of it's holding clip, pop in a new one, and get upright before you pass out. Check all of the fuses. If they are good change the flasher which is in the fuse box on some cars. The flasher on most cars is located around the fuse box under the dash, or attached to the underside of the dash. It is a small round cylindrical Can made of aluminum, or plastic.

Answer

If your turn signal flashers stopped working, play with the emergency flasher button on top of the steering column. Our 97 Sable turn signals quit once and luckily I pushed the emergency flasher button in and out many times and the signals have worked ever since. But the emergency flashers don't work, but I can live with that.

The turn signal flasher relay is located behind the left hand side of the instrument panel at the left hand side of the steering column.

IT'S USUALLY ON THE FUSE BLOCK UNDER THE DASH ON THE DRIVER'S SIDE. IT OFTEN LOOKS LIKE AN ALUMINUM CYLINDER(SILVER) AN SIMPLY PLUGS IN.

it is truly under the driver-side of the dashboard, but near the outer edge. it is truly a blue cube(original) and held in place with one 7mm screw into a built-in clip. it is left of the code-checking jack and the screw head faces down. once the screw is removed, the cube and harness drop down. there is no retaining clip-thank God-just carefully pry the three-prong cube away from the harness. now, my replacement cube didnt have a place on it for the clip, but the clip can be glued onto the new cube. or, ty-wrap the works in place....But,,, I did find that another's response was correct!!! i didnt need to change my flasher-the hazard switch WAS truly gummed-up!! i used a few drops of alchohol-not wd40 (that scares the electrician in me)-exercised the hazard and turnsignals feverishly and they began working miraculously! and , i appreciated other info on changing those pesky front turn signal lamps! it IS an easy job of removing the three bolts of the headlamp,removing the headlamp to get to the harness of the turn signal and voila!!! I'll even add that my signal lense was full of water, but nothing that a couple of well-placed weep holes didnt fix!! happy motoring!!!

I can;t believe it but the oil works. It worked in 10 seconds. Thanks for the quick fix!!

The flasher relay is located behind left side of instrument panel. Purchase the Relay and you will know what you are looking for.

583584585
Mercury Sable
Heater Cores and Blower Fans

How do you change a heater core on a 1996-1999 Taurus - Sable?

Start with Taurus Car Club Link Below

Replete with diagrams and illustrations!

Unless you really want to remove the entire dash...

IN ORDER TO CHANGE A HEATER CORE IN A TAURUS, YOU NEED TO DRAIN THE COOLANT, DISCONNECT THE HEATER HOSES FROM THE CORE CONNECTED ON THE FIRE WALL BEHIND THE ENGINE. PULL THE DASH AND COLUMN, REMOVE THE CORE FROM THE HEATER CASE AND REASSEMBLE IN REVERSE ORDER. AS YOU CAN SEE THIS WILL BE A FAIRLY BIG JOB. PAYS AROUND 4.0 HR AT A DEALER SHIP.

Above is true, but I've been told by a ford tech at the Dealer you don't have to Remove the column: just pull the 4 bolts & the Shifter Cable if Gearshift is NOT on the floor.

Drop it down & rest on the seat. Should provide enough clearance in order to get the dash out.

I'll find out for sure this weekend.

There is no short cut or fast way to do this. The dash has to come out to access the heater box and replace the core. So the steps in replacing the heater core are to disconnect the heater hoses, remove the dash, to access the heater core cover on the front of the heater case and replace the core. Reassembly is in the reverse order as disassembly. Fill the cooling system with new coolant, and burp the air form the cooling system.

There is a mechanic who found a way to do it without dash removal, in 1996-1999 Taurus / Sables.

http://www.airsept.com/Articles/RecycleGuard/macs_SR03.03.pdf

  • Library - you can review a number of manuals they'll have for the procedure - use the copy machine to get the relevant pages to take home and get all greasy.
  • Haynes or Chiltons manuals are around $15 (US) and a great investment if you do much of your own repair and maintenance work. Check any auto parts or book stores for these.

This process is very lengthy, I would recommend that you purchase a Haynes or Chilton manual for you vehicle before attempting to replace the core. Simply put, the Heater core is located behind the dash of the vehicle. The entire dash must be removed to access the door. The hoses are located in the Engine compartment and they lead to the firewall. This is not a project to be taken on by a novice (no offense) and if you do plan to do it yourself, make sure you have another vehicle to rely on. Plan on your Taurus being out of commission for at least 2 days.

  1. 1 is absolutely right!

I've done 3 now and have it down to a full day each. It's a tedious bear!

There is a mechanic who found a way to do it without dash removal. It is in this article: http://www.airsept.com/Articles/RecycleGuard/macs_SR03.03.pdf

The heater hoses must be disconnected at the firewall, and the inlet and outlet of the core plugged to prevent coolant pouring out into the interior of the car. Disconnect the battery.

The steering column and dashboard must be entirely removed from the car to access the heater core which is located in the A/C evaporator case. The electric motor which moves the flaps which direct air to various vents is then removed, allowing the heater core cover to be opened. The core is then removed towards the rear of the car. The full instructions fill 48 printed pages in my Ford factory manual.

I have just had this problem myself and even though I wasn't the one who fixed it, my brother came up with a nifty little idea and now I believe it can be used as a nice little selling feature. Instead of removing the entire dash and steering column (what a rip off, this method is going to run you about $600-$800), just cut a whole in the dash in front of the heater core compartment, from the ash tray to the glove box and then approximately 8 inches up from the bottom edge of the dash. You will still have to remove the flapper adjuster motor, but instead of 10 hours for someone who knows how to do it, this should only take 3-4 for someone just bulling their way through. Good luck and enjoy saving about $500.

Hmmm, from the dude above, so now we have a big hole in the dash. Not a good idea. It is not a huge job, just takes a little time. Sit back, take a deep breath, and do it right.

you would have to rip the dash apart. its alot easier to spend the money taking it to a good reputable mechanic

There is a mechanic who found a way to do it without dash removal. It is in this article: http://www.airsept.com/Articles/RecycleGuard/macs_SR03.03.pdf

Buy the service manual from Ford, or the Chiltons or Haynes versions of a repair / service manual.

http://www.taurusclub.com/wiki/index.php/Gen_3_and_4_96-on_Heater_Core_Replacement_-_without_removing_the_dash - no need to remove the dash!!!

Try flushing it out first, unless its leaking.

This link, referenced above, is money! (literally - about $600)

http://www.taurusclub.com/wiki/index.php/Gen_3_and_4_96-on_Heater_Core_Replacement_-_without_removing_the_dash - no need to remove the dash!!!

I changed my heater core in less than 5 hrs without removing the dash, and that included time to try to glue the little plastic piece that easily breaks if not careful (see above link). You can even do it without taking out the radio, which the above links recommend. I'm not a novice, but by no means an expert, in working on cars either.

Thanks for the postings above!

Be sure to review the "Related Questions" below...

Do you want to keep the car forever?

If your answer is yes, have a reputable service garage or a dealership service center diagnose and/or replace the core. (approx. $500)

If you're not sure how long you want to keep the car or if you are a sportsman and you are small enough to fit on your back on the passenger side floor of the car, listen up...

1. Let the car cool down.

2. Drain the coolant by opening the petcock at the bottom right of the radiator. It is plastic, it is breakable, it is recessed in the lower radiator core support, use caution. remove the recovery reservoir cap to speed up the draining.

3. Locate the heater inlet and outlet hoses on the firewall. They look alot like A/C hoses because they have short rubber sections connected to longer bent steel sections bolted to the firewall. If you are lucky, you can remove the hose clamps at the firewall and pull the hose ends off. If you aren't as lucky, you can move the clamps as far out away from the firewall as possible and slice the hose ends lengthwise with a razor knife so they can be removed.

4. Take a picture of the hoses and their routes with a digital camera so you can replace them too. You will probably replace the entire circuit of heater hoses with rubber hoses cut to length. Leave the steel tubes on the car, they make great supports to zip tie the new hoses to and they help to keep the hoses out of the way of moving parts. Make sure to notice that there are two different diameter hoses used and two tee fittings.

5. Crawl under the passenger side of the dash and look up. You will see a black plastic molded cover about a foot and a half long. Pull the cover down (it isn't attached with any fasteners, just pressed up into the space).

6. Now look up again and you will see a white plastic electronic motor control module.

7. Remove the metal dash support which covers part of the electronic motor control module.

8. Unscrew the other screws holding the electronic motor control module in place and duct tape the module up out of your way.

9. Now you will be looking at a narrow rectangular black plastic cover for the heater core sitting at a slight upward angle. There is a metal spring (save this it is important) and a metal actuator stick held in place by a tiny c-clip. Remove them and keep track of them.

10. Remove the screws for the cover and pry the cover off with your fingernails. There is a foam gasket under the cover which will also need to be saved.

11. Now the heater core end will be visible and if you are very lucky...you will be able to carefully slide it out and slightly sown past the wiring harness and bottom of the dashboard and remove it. If you are like me you may have to cut the part of the dash that obstructs the core or even loosen the right side trim screws that hold the dash in place. But, you do not have to remove the entire instrument panel. Cut just enough to get it out without bending the cooling fins on the end of the core. Save the section of dash you cut off, you can glue or tape it back in or just leave it off.

12. Save the foam insulating wrap on the old core and put it on the new core.

13. Slide the new core into the hole and reassemble the linkage, cover, and dash.

14. Carefully assemble new hoses, clamps, and fittings inside the engine compartment and route the hoses as the old ones were.

15. Fill the cooling system with about 10 quarts of water for now.

16. Look for leaks before you start the car.

17. Remember that the heater core is the gathering point for rust and sediment so you should invest in a professional back flush. They will fill the system with the proper mix of antifreeze.

18. GOOD LUCK...approx. 4 hours in a level driveway.

Get a manual on your car from DISCOUNTAUTOREPAIRMANUALS.COM and it will tell you how to replace your heater core. This is a hard job.

Many shops won't tell you they break part of the dash to do this job in half the time so they can still charge you for the full time

I am working on a 97 Taurus, which is similar.

The repair is involved and requires you to drain the cooling systems. Then remove the instrument cluster, that requires removal of the steering column.

Chilton has a manual that gives step by step directions. If you can't find it, we used to copy pages from the library's copy.

The manual is cheaper than just getting a mechanic to diagnose the problem.

_____________________________________________________________________

Here is some help for 1999 Sable, single overhead cam 3.0.

Do you have to remove the entire dash? No! Steering column? Nope. Do you have to loosen the dash? Most definitely.

Start by removing the black panel under the glove box (most of this procedure is listed above). From there you can see the white box housing an electrical motor. Take it off. I also removed the glove box and the glove box surround (three screws on the hinge, turn storage compartment sideways and pull). The surround just pulls out, it is held in place with Christmas trees. Also remove the ash tray. It has wires that run to the cigarette lighter, just pull them off, press in the black plastic tabs on the sides and pull it forward.

Now you can see what you are doing. Behind that white electrical motor box is access to the heater core. Unscrew the cover, save the foam pad (see all those instructions above). Now, pull on the heater core (assuming you have already pulled off the hose in the engine compartment.) The heater core will hit part of the ashtray surround. It looks as if it will almost come out, doesn't it! And it will after you loosen the dash. Pop off the side covers of the dash in the door jams. You will see two screws on both driver's and passenger's sides. Loosen the drivers side until the bottom screw is almost out, and the top screw is just a few turns tighter than the bottom screw. Remove both screws on the passenger side. Pop off the defrost vent cover on top of the dash with a flat blade screw driver, or preferably a plastic wedge. You will see three screws, right, middle and left. Remove. Now the dash will be able to move forward and up, pivoting off the driver's side screws.

You may still have to cut a small piece of the dash. Pull the dash forward and up. Put a 2x4 under it to hold it or get your wife/buddy/relative to help you. If you don't have a wife/buddy/relative you better get the 2x4 and examine your blatant personality flaws. Pull the heater core forward and down. It may snag on the corner of the dash that was previously covered by the glove box surround. I cut this little corner off with a utility knife, and I am not sweating it because it all gets covered back up! Now get that nasty old core out, reverse directions with the new core, and if your impeller blades haven't rusted completely off like mine are, then you should have heat rolling out those vents!

I did not have to disconnect the steering column, radio, or any other such nonsense. Oh, and do your self a favor and remove the passenger seat. It is just four bolts and a little wiring harness. You can then roll around on the floor to find whatever angle you need to get your big head up under the dash.

This isn't easy. But it sure beats removing the radio, steering wheel, column, dash, vents, gauge harnesses, etc.

I have never seen steel coolant lines before. This must have been Ford's way of destroying the Taurus/Sable after 6-10 years of use. The 99 Sable is consistently getting better gas mileage than our 06 Taurus. The 99 has 180k, and runs so smooth! That 3.0 is a great motor, and now that I have a new heater core and water pump, I hope to put another 100k on it.

581582583
Ford Taurus
Mercury Sable
Heater Cores and Blower Fans

How do you change the heater blower motor on a Taurus - Sable?

Recall and Technical Service Bulletin

The body style that ran from about '99-'03 had a issue with rain water getting into the blower case and ruining the blower resister assembly and the blower motor. There is a modified cowl cover that is supposed correct this condition. One tell tale sign that you have this problem is pull the blower resister assembly out and examine it. If it has corrosion or rust on the terminals, you have this problem. Replace the resister assembly, blower motor, and cowl cover.

There is a detailed posting on this problem in the "Related Links" below

It's very easy.

You'll see the round, black blower motor on the right side of the passenger side of the car, under the glove compartment.

Either remove the glove compartment door by taking out the three screws under the door itself (very easy) or gently push in the two retaining bars on either side of the glove box door and let the door drop down. I think removing the door is easier and more efficient.

There are three screws holding the motor in place. They are very obvious. Simply remove them (I think they are 9/32nd socket heads). Disconnect the wiring clip going to the motor (easy and pretty obvious). Then pull the motor out. It may feel like it's still attached, but if you took out all three screws, just a little pressure will get it out.

You may have to remove one of the plastic one-way fasteners holding the plastic piece under the glove box in order to get the motor out. I had to do this. Gently, but firmly pull the plastic piece until the plastic fastener comes out of it's hole. Or you can snip the fastener shaft. You'll have to replace the fastener if you do this.

Then just reverse everything and your motor is back in place. Answer

Look under the passenger's side dash, just below the glove box area. There may be a plastic shield underneath, that you remove by simply tugging down on it. On the heater box, you will see the blower motor held in with four 8mm hex head screws. Disconnect the electrical connector, remove the screws, remove, and replace the blower motor. It should take you about 15 minutes. It's pretty simple.

The blower motor is under right-hand side of the dash, remove panel to see it. If you want got to mechanixtrix.com they have pictures of it and how to remove it. Also check cowl panel on right-hand side it may be warped allowing water to enter and causing blower motor to break.

1. Disconnect the negative battery terminal. 2. Disengage the instrument panel insulator from the instrument panel 3. Detach the wiring connector at the blower motor. 4. Remove the 3 screws retaining the blower motor to the evaporator housing and remove the blower motor and wheel assembly. 5. If required, separate the blower motor wheel form the blower motor by removing the retainer from the blower motor shaft and sliding the blower motor wheel off the blower motor shaft.

Reverse to install.

I have the same problem with my 1989. I had to take the glove box out to get to it. But before you purchase the actual blower motor, take a tester to the wiring that goes to it (starting at the blower motor end and make sure its not one of the coiled looking "resistors" along the way or the switch) Turned out on mine that its not the blower motor itself, but something in the switch or the path of wiring to the blower motor. Sorry not more help.

Cathy

The blower motor is located in the a/c evaporator housing on the passengers side under the dash.

Remove the cover from under the glove compartment on passenger side. Once removed the blower motor is towards the passenger door. Unplug the blower motor and remove the 3 screws from the housing. Pull the motor out and reverse order of removal. Some brand new motors don't come with the fan, so you might have to take old fan off from old motor and reattach to new motor. Is very simple just be careful when taking clip off of shaft holding the fan on.

Chck behind the glove box area

575576577
Mercury Sable
Mercury

How do I fix my no heat situation on a Mercury Sable?

Start with the "Related Question" below - this is an excellent starting point to extensive coverage and information on Taurus/Sable heating & cooling problems and fixes.

AnswerI had a similar problem and it turned out my heater core was completely clogged, I recommend flushing it yourself as it will take a few hours of labor but is quite simple. Buy a flush kit and flush it out a few times with water. I used hot water from a water heater in the basement and an air compressor b/c my coolant hadnt been changed in years. AnswerYES THERE IS A HEATER DOOR MOTOR ON TOP OF THE TRANSFER CASE FOR YOUR AC AND HEATER IF YOUR AC WORKS BUT NOT YOUR HEATER IT IS LIKELY THIS IS THE PROBLEM? AnswerThe first, simple step is to check your coolant. If it is low, check the coolant reservoir for leaks. Then add coolant. If that is not the problem, there are other things you can try. The cooling system on these cars are notorious for getting clogged. Flush your radiator and see if that helps. If not, check the two hoses leading through the firewall to the heater core (Under your dash). Run the car with the heater on and see if those hoses get hot. If they do not, the core may be blocked. You can flush the heater core with a water-hose connected to the hoses to the core. Make sure to run water both ways and flush the heater core till the water comes out clean.

If that does not work, check the thermostat. It could be stuck...but more likely it is one of the vacuum hoses or the bender door inside the dash. Check the vacuum hoses first, they are not difficult to replace.

Answeryou have an air lock you have to purge the system buy letting it run with the rad cap off it will work itself out be sure to top it up!......rosdale joe AnswerCould also have something to do with the temperature blend door, the motor that drives it, or even a plugged heater core.

Read through the "Related Questions" below for much more information and diagnostics, along with some fixes to the problems.

What do you mean by not work?If you are talking about it not putting out heat, then your thermostat is probably stuck open or the heater core is partially clogged. In either case replace the thermostat, and flush the cooling system.

Now if you are talking about the blower motor not working, then it is either a blown fuse, defective blower motor, bad blower motor resistor pack, blower motor switch, or bad wiring.

AnswerHeater core may be "air bound" and needs to be bled. Heater control cable may not be working Answeri think your temp controls are stuck, there is a door inside the heater that controls whether you get heat, a/c, or vent air. it is probably stuck in a/c position and wont let heated air in but is clicking because it is trying to open. AnswerCheck your engine cooling system. Now. The heater runs off of the cooling system by using hot coolant from the motor to heat the cab. If your heater has failed it could be that you are low on coolant or your pump has failed. If either is true you can crack your block by driving the car.

Now of course things probably arn't so dire. You may have a vacuum leak in the control system or a stuck air door. However, it could be a major problem that could wreck the car.

Try the simple things first: the thermostat.For example, thermostats are designed to fail open.That means they always circulate coolant for cooling and the temperature of the coolant never reaches the level required to heat the auto interior. The coolant that flows through the heater core, which is a like a mini-rad for the interior, never has coolant hot enough running through it to throw heat, when the fan is on.A new thermostat will close, in time, to allow enough heat build up to give the heater core hot coolant, which gives off heat to the interior, when you turn your heater fan on.

Either the heater core is clogged or the heater temperature control valve is defective.

543544545
Mercury Sable
Car Fuses and Wiring

Where can you find a fuse panel diagram for a 1996-2010 Mercury Sable?

There are 2 fuse boxes / fuse panels in nearly every Ford product: one directly above the driver's left foot (when the driver is actually sitting in the driver's seat). The other is inside the engine compartment, on the right side - contains high current fuses.

The Owners Manuals have detailed illustrations and information regarding the two fuse box / panels, and the various vehicle systems each fuse connects to.

See "Related Questions" below

Most fuse boxes and power distribution boxes have a cover or access plate over them. Usually, on the inside of this cover or plate is a pictorial diagram of the layout of all the fuse locations in that particular box. Each fuse or circuit breaker position will be labeled on that diagram. Sometimes the actual base plastic of the box has the description printed by each fuse in it. (These can be very hard to read). Good luck!

Autozone also has online diagrams of the fuse box / panels.

Under the steering column next to the brake pedal

I have become an expert on fuse boxes since I am having a problem with mine. The fuse box, otherwise known as the central junction box is underneath the dash on the drivers side just to the left of the brake pedal. It has 3 big connectors on the left part of it and a black plastic cover on the right side of it. You can pop open the cover to expose the fuses and relays. It is not that easy to get to it but it is doable.

The other fuse box, also known as the battery junction box is located under the hood just to the left of the battery.It also has a plastic cover on it. Just pop open the cover and you will expose the fuses and relays.

There is another relay box between the battery and the fender, it is very long and narrow and is black in color. It only has relays in it.

Ford decided to do a very dumb thing, they have placed up to 10 relays inside the central junction box which are soldered onto the circuit board in the box. These relays are for the autolamps, horn, battery saver, door lock & unlock, windshield washer pump, etc. You cannot replace these $5.00 relays because they are soldered onto the circuit board. You have to replace the fuse box which cost around $170.00 at the dealer. So, if you have a bad $5.00 relay,like I do, expect to pay around $200 to replace it.

I too had a problem because my autolamps would not go "ON" and are very familiar with fuse boxes. I went to the junk yard and bought a fuse box for $10.00. Make sure the fuse box part number matches exactly or some of your accessories may not work. WHY WOULD FORD NOT MAKE THE RELAYS A REPLACEABLE ITEM??? I even went to the dealer and they had no clue where the autolamp relay was. Go figure!!!!!

If get on the floor on the driver's side and look up where the pedals connect there should be a fuse box there or there is one under the hood on the lower right hand side.

Click on the link below

Click on Owner Guides

The owners manual ( which includes the fuse diagram ) can be viewed on-line

It has many fuses protecting many circuits, which are many sizes, and types. You will have to be more specific. Have you looked in your owner's manual?

Below and to the left of your steering wheel , by the brake pedal . remove the panel

cover to access the fuses

The fuse compartment is found underneath the steering wheel consule, towards the left. A plastic cover needs to be removed to access the fuses.

509510511
Starters and Ignition Systems
Ford Taurus
Mercury Sable

Where to find and how to replace the starter on a Taurus - Sable?

What does a starter cost? 1998 DOHC: Autozone has two offerings: $135 for a re-manufactured unit and $155 for brand new

What about the starter solenoid? The starter solenoid is integrated into the body of the starter, and cannot be replaced separately. You will need to replace the entire starter assembly.

New Answer It is simple to replace. They are located at the front of engine.

  • Disconnect Negative Battery cable first,
  • raise vehicle and support vehicle,
  • remove the electrical wires from starter,
  • remove mounting bolts (2 or 3) and remove starter.
I know this because I used to work on them. Answer Remove - battery cable

Raise and support vehicle

Disconnect wiring harness at top of starter

Remove starter mounting bolts

Remove starter Where to find the starter the easiest way to find the starter on any vehicle is to follow the wire directly from the battery down to the starter, it may go from the battery to a junction post used for jump-starting, but it will go from there to the starter because you need a direct flow of current from the battery to turn the starter over. Starters are typically found at the front - bottom of the engine.

Note that the front end of the starter inserts into the place where the transmission and engine join up, so look in the middle section At the end of the rad battery cable coming off the battery. Answer Disconnect Battery First It's simple. 2 bolts, two wires. Raise the front of the car, put jackstands underneath. Crawl under the front, look up, there is the starter. Remove the two wires, note their positions, one is big, the other is small. Remove the two bolts, remove the starter, be careful not to let it drop on your head, it might hurt. Replace the install the two bolts, install the two wires(they will only go on one way). Lower the car, reconnect the battery, and Voila! 30 minutes later, you are done! Go get an ice cream or a soda, you deserve a reward! Remove one post from battery then wire connections from starter. Remove mounting bolts and remove starter. Towards the front of the car about a foot back from the radiator bolted to the engine/trans.; it is accessible from underneath.

Sable Starter The starter on a 96 Sable with a 3.0 litre is at the front of the engine (looking down on the engine compartment with the hood open standing at the front of the car) where th engine and transaxle bolt together.To lay down under the bumper and looking up is the best way to view. Answer It's simple. 2 bolts, two wires. Raise the front of the car, put jackstands underneath. Crawl under the front, look up, there is the starter. Remove the two wires, note their positions, one is big, the other is small. Remove the two bolts, remove the starter, be careful not to let it drop on your head, it might hurt. Replace the install the two bolts, install the two wires(they will only go on one way). Lower the car, reconnect the battery, and Voila! 30 minutes later, you are done! Go get an ice cream or a soda, you deserve a reward! Answer Disconnect the battery, raise the front end and crawl under the car. The starter is bolted to the transmission bellhousing, and will be held on with either 2 or 3 bolts. There will be two wires going to the starter, one held on with a 13mm nut, the other held on with either an 8mm or a 10mm nut, or it may have a small spade type connector. There will also be a ground wire attached to one of the starter bolts with a nut. Disconnect the two wires and the ground wire, unbolt the starer, and replace. It is noyt difficult, and it will probably take you about 30 mins to do, once you figure our what tools you need, which you should be able to do everything with a basic socket set, as long as you have some deep well sockets. Answer It's simple. 2 bolts, two wires. Raise the front of the car, put jackstands underneath. Crawl under the front, look up, there is the starter. Remove the two wires, note their positions, one is big, the other is small. Remove the two bolts, remove the starter, be careful not to let it drop on your head, it might hurt. Replace the starter, install the two bolts, install the two wires(they will only go on one way). Lower the car, reconnect the battery, and Voila! 30 minutes later, you are done! Go get an ice cream or a soda, you deserve a reward! Answer The solenoid is part of the starter. Replace the entire starter. It is located next to the oil filter at the front of the motor. Follow the positive battery cable; it will first lead to the starter solenoid and then continue to the starter.

Disconnect the - battery cable Raise and support vehicle Remove wiring from top of starter Remove starter mounting bolts Remove starter

Answer - 1992 remove + battery cable remove starter, I used a 3 foot extension to get to the one nasty bolt in back, put just in front of the left front tire..sometimes it pays not to get too close to your work!! Its not hard, but access to bolts are terrible. It look simple till you try and get a socket or wrench on the nut/bolt!! install new starter, hookup wires at starter, then battery+. crank, crank, zoom,zoom [with the 3.8] Inspect for damaged wiring in the harness for the starter. Sharp corners can cut..

Depends what year is it, on a 1998 it's at the bottom by the oil pan and there are three bolts

The starter is located just underneath the oil filter.

This is a fairly simple repair. You will need a socket set (you can do it with wrenches if you have to, but sockets make it much easier) and a jack.

1. Disconnect the negative terminal from the battery.

2. The starter is located directly below the oil filter. It is held on by two bolts which are to the right of the oil filter. One is easiest reached from the top of the car and the other from the bottom. If you have trouble locating the bolts, just take a look at your new starter to determine where the bolts are located. The bolts screw in from the driver's side of the car.

3. Once the bolts are off, the starter should be loose from the engine. (You can thank the designers at Ford for making this a particularly dirty job. The starter gets doused with oil every time the oil filter is taken off so get you can expect the bolts and the starter to be covered in grease and gunk.)

4. Maneuver the starter so that the terminals facing up so you can easily get to them from the top of the engine compartment. Pull the terminal cover off. Remove both cables from the starter. The starter should now be completely free.

5. Place the cables on your new starter and replace the terminal cover. Bolt the starter back in same position as the old one.

6. Reconnect the negative battery terminal and start the car.

Remove the Negative(black) wire off the battery Raise and support the car. using a 10mm wrench remove the smaller cable going to the starter. using a 13mm wench/socket remove the larger cable that comes strait from the Positive (Red) terminal of the battery from the Starter using a 13 mm wench remove the lower and upper starter bolts. The heads for these are on the engine side of the starter. They will likely be hard to turn at first.

the starter should now be easy to remove. Compare the old and new starter to make sure they match, then do the above steps in reverse.

498499500
Mercury Sable

How do you replace the fuel filter on a Mercury Sable?

It is in front of the rear wheel well passenger side, about an inch in. There are two plastic tabs that hold the fuel lines to the filter. Just pop them out (don't use tools). You may need to push them through with something small like a screwdriver, just don't use the tool on the fuel line fittings and be careful with those lines with anything sharp.

Before you disconnect the lines from the filter, you must relieve the fuel system pressure by removing the two fuel pump relay fuses in the fuse box under the hood. After they are removed, start the car and wait until the engine dies. Just be sure to wear safety goggles and be ready for some gas to spurt. This is normal. The clamp holding the filter is just one screw (like regular hose clamps). Wiggle the filter backward. Put your new one in (make sure the flow arrow is pointing toward the engine). Reattach the fuel lines to the filter, pop in new tabs (always). Replace the fuses in the fuse box. Turn the key to the position just before the engine starts to allow the fuel pump to prime, do this 2-3 times, then you are ready to start the car. Job time is about 30 minutes including jacking the car up. AnswerYou will need to jack up the RR (right rear) corner of the vehicle to reach it. The fuel filter is fastened with a big clamp to the right side frame rail, close to the fuel tank, just ahead of the RR wheel.

Disconnect fuel lines:

  • On 1986-1999 models, use a small flat screwdriver to remove the two plastic clips from the lines attached to the filter.
  • On 2000+ models use a different type of 'snap' connector. There is a specialized fuel-line disconnect tool- a small round plastic device that slips onto the fuel line and presses into the clip to release. Rather inexpensive.

    It is very likely you can simply squeeze the connectors with small pliers while pulling the line out.

  • Be careful! The lines may be under pressure, and fuel may spray out as you unplug the first line from the filter.

Use a flat screwdriver, or 5/16 nut-driver to loosen the clamp from the body of the filter to remove old filter

Install

  • Mount the new filter into clamp & tighten (not too much - just snug)

    Be sure the 'flow' arrow is pointing towards the engine

  • for early model years, insert the new plastic line clips that are in the box with the filter into the lines and then plug the lines onto the filter until you hear them click in place.
  • For 2000+ models, push line onto filter end until you hear them click in

NOTES:

  • watch out for dripping gas - be prepared with rags & small container.
  • Chilton's recommends 30,000 mile replacement - 15K under severe conditions
  • Cost is about $10-15
  • Test: blow into it - the more back-pressure, the more plugged up it is
  • ** used mouthwash before kissing loved ones or smoking after conducting fuel filter test
Releasing Fuel Pressure
  • Release the fuel pressure using a fuel pressure gauge or disconnecting power to inertia switch located in the jack compartment at the right rear of the van.
  • If inertia switch disconnect method is used, start the car and let it run until it dies on its own. This will burn most of the fuel in fuel line.
AnswerDon't know about a 1990, but on my 1997 its located on the underside of the car on the passenger side right in front of the rear wheel.

The fuel filter is located in longside the gas tank - in front of the right rear wheel.

  • Lift up the white colored plastic clips holding the fuel lines to the filter. THERE WILL BE FUEL DRAINAGE! Have a small cup to catch it and no smoking!
  • Unclamp the filter from the bracket - 5/16ths nutdriver

You actually would have to work real hard to put the filter in backwards, but just to be sure, note the arrow on the side indicating the fuel flow direction.

Of course, reverse the steps to install.

483484485
Headlights Tail and Brake Lights
Mercury Sable

How do you replace the tail or brake light bulbs on a Sable?

You go through the trunk and on either side is the light housing unit that you remove 4 nuts from, pull out and there will be the individual bulbs to be replaced.

IN DEPTH:

In order to replace the light bulbs you will have to remove the entire rear light housing unit. In order to do this you must do the following:

  1. Pop the trunk.
  2. Loosen the trunk lining in order to reach the 4 nuts that are located on the right or left side and hold the light housing in place.
  3. You loosen the trunk lining fabric by removing two small, black plastic fasteners that anchor the trunk lining fabric. These either screw loose or you will need to pop off using a blunt- nosed pliers ( a flat head screwdriver works in a pinch) by first pulling the square bit out (towards the direction of the back seat,) followed by the circular components.
  4. Pull the fabric loose on either the left or right side to expose the 4 nuts holding the light assembly in place.
  5. Now, look for the four gold colored washer and nut assemblies surrounding the tail-light assembly. Find yourself a 7/16 socket and remove those bad boys. The tail-light itself should be able to pop- out, otherwise you've missed a washer- nut.
  6. Ease the tail- light assembly off of it's perch on the car and hold it red- side down. This will expose the wiring and "turn- locks" for the blinker and tail- light.
  7. Remove the bulbs from the assembly by turning the turn- locks in the direction (counter- clockwise) indicated by the plastic molding, and pulling upwards, off of the tail- light assembly.
  8. Pull the bulb from the turn- lock with a moderate tug of the hand.

See "Related Questions"

The tail light, brake light, turn signal and backup light bulbs are located in the same tail lamp / lens assembly. Follow the same steps to replace either bulb.

Sedan

  1. Open trunk and remove two plastic mushroom nuts, five push pins and the plastic cover from inside the trunk to get at the lens mounting nuts

    The nuts are likely 10mm - and a deep-well socket will handy to speed removal

  2. Remove three nuts and washers and the lens will pull away making it easy to get at the bulb sockets. Turn counter-clockwise to release the socket

Wagon

  1. Open the liftgate to remove the 2 lens assemblies mounting screws -
  2. Pull the lens assembly from the tailgate
  3. Twist the bulb socket counterclockwise to release
  4. Pull the bulb straight out of the socket and push in the new bulb.

Tip: the old adage if one goes, the other is likely to follow shortly is true in my experience. While you've got the tools out, and typically you get 2 bulbs in the package, just do the bulbs on both sides of the car - you'll be back out there real soon anyways. Answer It's done from inside the trunk -- there is 5 11mm nuts. the upper three nuts remove the tail lamp assembly. There are two bulbs..running light and break light bulbs. the bulb to the red glass compartment is your break bulb. Takes about 5 minutes unscrewing the nuts, replacing the bulb, screwing the nuts back on and finally replacing the liner. Answer You have to remove the 'carpeted' panel behind it in the trunk and then remove all of the bolts that holds the brake light assembly in place. The assembly will pull out and then you remove the light socket from the assembly, replace the bulb and reverse this process to re install. The clips to remove the carpeted panel require a flat screwdriver to 'pry' them out and then they pull straight out. Whole process takes about 10 minutes if you know what you're doing (I didn't the first time, took about 30 minutes) Additional Information1996-2005Bulb Numbers:

  • FRONT Turn-signal - 3457 AK (amber)
  • Headlamp - 9007 QL (9007LL optional)
  • Tail lamp/brake/turn lamp 3157
  • Tail lamp/brake lamp (wagon) 3157
  • Rear turn lamp (wagon) 3456K
  • Backup lamp 921
  • Backup lamp (wagon) 3156
  • License plate lamp (2) 168
  • High-mount brake lamp (2) 912
  • Rear side marker lamp (wagon) (2) 168

The above information extracted from the Owners Manuals(see below)

465466467
Ford Taurus
Mercury Sable
Radio

How do you remove the radio from a 1986-1995 Taurus-Sable?

Use the removal tools to pull the radio assembly out of the dash - note: you do NOT need to remove the plastic trim piece! :)

  • Insert the tools into each pair of small holes on either side of the radio face
  • They're all the way in when you feel them hit an indent, or a bit of 'click'
  • Push the tops of the tools to the *OUTSIDE* while pulling the radio out from the dash. This is more "art" & feel than specific instructions.

- Disconnect the 2 or 3 wire harness connectors off & disconnect the radio antenna wire.

As you can imagine, re-installing is just a matter of connecting the wire harnesses & antenna - align and push the radio back in until you hear/feel the side-clips click back into place.

TIPS:

  • Be sure to spend the few dollars for the wire harness kit - This saves you from having to CUT the factory wiring. If you sell the car, it takes only 10 minutes to put the factory radio back.
  • Many places even give you the radio removal tools when you buy a radio from them, like Crutchfield.com
  • Do not try to save a few dollars and spend far more than $5 worth of your time with home made tools

In my opinion, the only way to properly install an after-market CD player in any vehicle would be to make a trip to your local electronics store and buy the adapter (harness) for that vehicle. They are pretty inexpensive and a lot more dependable.

first disconnect the positive& negative battery cables.then wait for two minutes.then insert removal tool into the four holes in the control panel. if you don't have one use a metal coat hanger and bend it so it has a u-shape.then insert them in all four holes about 1-1/2 inches until you feel the clips release.then push the tools outward and pull the assembly out of the instrument panel.disconnect the wiring harness & vacuum hoses. if you want to replace it with a CD player you will have to get the kit.go to www.scosche.com and they will have what you need.good luck!

Don't want to spend the money? You can insert 4 small slender rods in the 4 holes on the left and right side of the radio (small Allen wrenches or very long nails, or similar). insert until you feel some tension, then apply slight pressure towards the outside of the radio while pulling the radio out. There are clips that you need to press in towards the radio to release it. Sometimes, you can do one side at a time.

-donville

ClarifiedThe answer that donville provided is excellent, however it doesn't take you through it step by step.

You can use two long screwdrivers and put them into the side closest to the cassette dock. Then you can push away from the stereo while grabbing the front. This will kick out the one side of the device. Do the same on the other two holes, but have a firm grip on the front of the stereo. Otherwise the side that you have popped out will pop back in. From here you can pull the stereo out and tilt it up so the hook above the stereo will clear the top of the main housing.

By using this http://www.crutchfield.com/p_120865618/Universal-DIN-Tool-Pair.HTML?tp=990

OK, I have a Mercury Sable 93 and 94 - if you have the stock radio that is a similar in size to a retail headunit, then you have to buy the Ford radio removal tools. I'm not sure of the specific name, but they're in the shape of a U, and only cost about $3 to $4. Put them in both sides until you feel an indent - push the tools outward while pulling the radio towards you.

You can usually take the factory stereo mounting brackets off and put them on the new radio and it should pop in and lock and release the same way you took the factory radio out.

DO NOT USE WIRE HANGERS!! For only about $3 you can buy the Ford radio removal tools made for this.

Also, you do not have to remove any dashboard trim - the radio will slide straight out of the opening with the tools. I have found that the clips can be taken off the old radio and screwed onto the new unit.

I also agree to buy the wiring harness! It is $15 well invested and they are readily available from most autoparts stores. Crutchfield.com will usually even throw them in if you buy a radio from them. (if not free, very inexpensive.)

Cut up a wire clothes hanger so that you make a tool shaped like the letter C. Ensure that the "C" is fairly long by cutting one end of the hanger close to the middle. Now you have your tool, look for two holes on either side of the stock radio and insert your "tool," into the holes about 1 to 1 1/2 inch, this should give you enough friction to pull it out. It will take a couple tries but you'll know you're doing it right when the radio partially comes out. Eventually it will pop out.

You only need the standard Ford radio, U shaped removal tools, readily & cheaply ($3-5) available at an auto parts store, Walmart, Kmart, etc.

(Don't try to save a few dollars and spend far more than $5 worth of your time with home made tools)

Use the removal tools to pull the radio assembly out of the dash - note: you do NOT need to remove the plastic trim piece! :)

  • Insert the tools into each pair of small holes on either side of the radio face
  • They're all the way in when you feel them hit an indent, or a bit of 'click'
  • Push the tops of the tools to the *OUTSIDE* while pulling the radio out from the dash. This is more "art" & feel than specific instructions.

- Disconnect the 2 wire harness connectors and the radio antenna wire.

Re-installing is just a matter of connecting the wire harnesses & antenna - align and push the radio back in until you hear/feel the side retainer-clips click back into place.

TIPS:

  • Be sure to spend the few dollars for a wire harness kit - This saves you from having to CUT the factory wiring. If you sell the car, it takes only 10 minutes to put the factory radio back.
  • Many places even give you the tools when you buy a radio from them, like Crutchfield.com

The same way you would change any Ford/Mercury factory car stereo. You use either the U-shaped Ford removal tools you can buy at any auto parts store (kept usually near the stereos, cost $5 at Advance/Discount Auto). Insert these in the two holes on either side of the factory stereo until you feel them slide in a little easier. This has released the retaining clips inside the stereo housing. Pull your hands apart as if stretching a piece of bubble gum or something, and pull out. The old factory stereo should slide out pretty easily.

Unhook the connectors in the back, the thicker black cable with the metal spear-like tip is your antenna wire.

You also need a wiring harness which you can buy for anywhere from $10-20 at any auto parts store or electronics store that sells car stereos. Most will have a simple wiring diagram printed on the package, you just splice the wires together, nearly all are color-coded and the new harness will use the same colors. Usually are 8 wires for the speakers, one colored and one striped for each of the four speakers (solid colored is positive, striped is negative) that will actually be on one harness (grey, I think) and the other harness (they do come as a set) should be black and for the power other connections. One blue wire is for the antenna control, which you can ignore if you have a separate switch on the dash to control it. Red wire is positive power, black is negative/ground. I think there is a yellow wire but hell if I can remember what its for, but like I said, there should be a basic wiring diagram on the package for the wiring harness.

Once you have the wiring harness connected to the new stereo (make sure you used crimp connectors or electrical tape, do NOT use duct tape or any other sort of tape), you just hook the new harness to the existing one in the car, and plug the black antenna cable into the obvious round hole in the back of the new stereo (some will also have a black line coming out of the stereo rear with a female connector to plug the antenna cable into). Once you have these connected, slide the stereo into the dashboard and make sure it fits tightly. You may need a mounting bracket kit, but in my experience, its usually not necessary.

Its fairly simple, the hardest part is cramming the wires back into the dashboard so the stereo will fit in tightly. The wiring harness connecting takes anywhere from 10 minutes to an hour, depending on your experience and confidence. My recommendation is to take the new stereo and the wiring harness inside and splice them together while you're watching some football or non-existant hockey.

Cut two pieces of coat hangar 5" long. Bend into "U" shape around a broom handle. On each side of the face of the radio are two holes. Insert your new tool approx. 1 " into the holes. Apply pressure outwards to release the clips holding the radio in the dash and pull the radio towards you.

... or you can just go to any sound shop or Wal-Mart and buy the tool for a couple of bucks... they'd have it by the head units and speakers.

Ford radio removal tools are available for just a few dollars from any auto parts store. Insert one into each set of 2 access holes on each side of the face of the radio unit. When inserting the tool, you will feel a spot where the notched ends have caught into a slight indentation. Push the tops of the tools outward (left and right) while simultaneously pulling the radio forward, away from the dash.

When you have the radio out, you'll see that the tools are actually releasing the clips on the side of the radio.

you will need to unscrew your dash and pull off the front plate of your dash, then you will need to unscrew the stock radio, then you will need to go ahead and pull out the adapter from the back of your radio. -Shocker

There are 2 small round holes on each side of the radio body faceplate. There are tools sold in sets of 2 that are inserted into the holes to release the catches. When inserted and the catches are released, the tools are used like handles to pull the stereo head out.

take 4 home trim nails in and push them twards the doors(left 2 to the left and right 2 to the right) pull out of dash

You can also go to O'Reilly auto parts and pick up a Ford Radio Removal Tool for 5 bucks,to go perfectly in and pop, then remove

460461462
Ford Taurus
Mercury Sable
Turn Signals and Hazard Lights

Why would your turn signals and flashers fail on a Taurus or Sable?

The three most likely causes seem to be the following:

  • Fuses
  • Flasher unit
  • Turn signal switch on the steering column

Here are some suggestions from our community on how to resolve the problem:

  • I had a similar problem. The fix is actually pretty easy. The car is almost 20 years old, has 200,000 miles on it. The connector for the lighting portion of the multi-function switch, is on the top of the TILT steering column. Every time you tilt the wheel down, you pull on this connector. The connector has two locking clips that hold it in place. After time, the connector becomes brittle, and the locking clips break off. That seems to be what happened to my friend's car, that she just purchased. The paint is pretty badly oxidized, which tells me the car was left in the sun a lot, which will speed up the aging of the plastic. One thing that might tip you off, is if you raise the wheel, the lights might start to work again. This is how I fixed it: Remove the battery cable, or you may drain the battery! Under the steering column, there are three Phillips head screws. Remove these, lower the steering column, and remove the tilt lever, Chilton's says you may need a small wrench to remove that lever. Remove the lower portion of the steering column cowl. Insert the ignition key, and turn to the running position. Since you have disconnected the battery cable, the car should not turn over. When you look at the bottom of the steering column, under the lock cylinder, you will see a round spot with a smaller circle in the middle. Use a small screwdriver or awl to depress the center spot. You should now be able to pull the lock cylinder out, and remove the top of the steering column cowl. On the very top of the steering column, you will see the connector to the multi-function switch. If the locking clips are broken, as they probably will be, as your car is now 20 years old, you have a problem. Pretty easy to fix. If you look carefully at the connector, you will notice there are two groups of wires, one on each side, with no wires in the middle of the connector. Pull the connector up, and get yourself some slack! Make certain that the steering column is at its lowest position, and that when you plug the connector in, it is not being pulled on. Then using a small drill, maybe 1/8 inch, carefully drill right next to the little nub that USED to hold the locking clip. Then put a 1" screw into the hole. That should hold it! Now reassemble the steering column. Watch for the "key in ignition sensor contact. The clip that holds that in place is very small. Mine was also broken. I put a little bit of silicone adhesive on it, pressed it back into place, and wrapped two wraps of electrician's tape around it, making sure that the tape was stuck onto itself. I know, this all sounds so tacky! But the car is 20 years old. You are going to need to get creative to keep it running!
  • Many vehicles have the hazard switch as a push-on push-off in the top center of the steering column. This is a good place to spray your WD-40 or similar cleaner as the contacts for this switch are often the problem, and being on the top side gravity will help the cleaner flow into the contact areas. Be careful if you use another product to be certain it doesn't contain alcohol or other solvent that can attack plastic. Such solvents introduced into any plastic switch component can destroy it rather than improve the functioning.
  • This works! I lost my turn signals and flashers this past weekend and stumbled on this WD40 solution. I have a 96 Taurus. I removed the steering column covers and sprayed in the switch and the hazard button area. I waited several minutes and tried but no luck. I reapplied until the WD40 was dripping quickly from the bottom of the switch. A real soaking. Then I agitated the turn switch for left and right and pushed the hazard button quickly up and down. Suddenly everything clicked in and worked. My guess is dirt and build up on the contacts is removed with the WD40. I also notice that my windshield wiper fluid now works with a slight touch. Previously I had to really push and push at it several times until a shot of wiper fluid would come out. This is a great solution! A new switch is about $120 and a flasher relay about $60. Thanks!
  • It may be your flasher, usually a round metal thing under the dash. check the bulbs If all four directional lights do not work, first check fuse, if fuse is good, your flasher is bad. If both your left and right turn signals (dash indicators & front/read lamps) do not come on, check Fuse, Flasher unit is good and plugged in and most importantly, the Hazard Flasher Switch (on some cars) may be unplugged or bad. If your turn signals and flashers don't work it could be your turn signal switch. The flasher lights and the blinkers both went out on my 97 Taurus. After checking the fuses (separate) and bulbs I looked online. I had found others saying that if your door ajar light and your inside light stays on to spray wd40 in the locks and the latch mechanism. Well I had this problem also so I tried it, and after years of not having an inside light this worked. I had previously removed the interior lamp relay because it wouldn't go out. I went back to address my original concern (blinkers and flashers) and I found that the most likely problem would be with the multi-function switch. While trying to get to the multi function switch in the steering column, I couldn't get the tilt steering lever off. I was getting very aggravated so I just sprayed the crap out of it wd40 (I had it there anyway) All I can say is that when they first started working they were intermittent and then fast flashing. I sprayed more wd40 and now the blinkers and the flashers work. Go figure.
  • My symptoms were very similar: the windshield washer fluid was hard to activate at first, then would not spray at all so I had the pump and electrical looked at but only a temporary fix, also the right turn signal was intermittent or double speed for a while and for 24 hours didn't work at all and then came back, and just today in very cold weather both turn signals and the hazards failed to turn on at all. Until I read this answer I hadn't put it all together, but when I sprayed the WD40 until dripping in the hazard button on top of the steering column and also into the base of the multifunction switch and into the joint between the windshield washer button at the end of the switch, working everything around vigorously and then letting it sit for 30 minutes, suddenly everything started working again. Turn signals, flashers, windshield fluid. Thanks everyone for this cheap and easy fix!
  • I have a 2004 Chevrolet Classic. The turn signals would not work - no lights on dash or even the clicking sound (from the flasher). All bulbs checked out O.K. The hazard lights worked fine. I replaced the multi-switch. Still did not work. I was ready to take to to the dealer to have them trace the wiring. As a last resort, I tried the WD-40 solution on the flasher switch - IT WORKED!!!! I was amazed. Fix Both Flashers with WD40 Squirt! WD40! No kidding!
  • Chances are the "multifunction switch" under the steering wheel has stuck open. Squirt WD40 generously under the Hazard warning light switch behind the steering wheel. Operate the switch on and off about a dozen times, then operate the turn-signal switch left and right about a dozen times. Add some more WD40 and let it sit a few minutes. Try again. It should begin to work. If not, replace the flasher for $10 at your local auto parts store ($40-50 at the Ford parts department). It's a blue plastic cube close under the dash to the left of the steering wheel. Just remove it from its bracket and push the new one in place. Voila, Viola!
  • You have probably figured it out by now, but it could be your multi-function switch located at the base of the turn signal, wiper, etc, stalk (lever). Also controls hazard lights. Not that hard to replace if necessary. Check out old switch with an olms meter. A Haynes guide book can help you. A new switch should cost less than $100. Just had the exact same problem on my 96 Crown Vic, plus I could flash the high beams, but not leave them on. Took off the turn signal stalk, opened it up at the base and all the copper contacts were corroded (by lube Ford uses at factory?) Cleaned them, and everything now works fine! Cost- zero!
  • For all these posts, whenever they mention WD40 being applied for electronics, while it may be ok to use WD40, you are probably safer using a lubricant made especially for electronic components. There are some plastics that WD40 is not good for and it can be overkill for places with electronic components and plastics in the same place. That said, I use a spray can lubricant I found in home depot called CRC Electrical Grade 2-26. I found it in the electrical department (house wiring etc). Just look for the one that says its safe for plastics and is made especially for electrical connections. I think it does the same thing as WD40 but without some of the corrosive effect on certain plastics. It also doesn't smell. I promise I do not own any stock in this company nor do I have a problem with WD40, I use it all the time for other applications.
  • Check that all parking and brake lights are working. Bad bulbs won't flash. Other possibles - blown fuse. flasher relay bad. switch kit inside steering column broke.
  • Your relay could be bad they are located underneath your dash on the driver side.
  • There is a device called a 'flasher' which is what actually makes the lights blink. It is usually in a very difficult place to locate, sometimes under the dashboard, sometimes in the engine compartment. If you own a car, it is worthwhile to purchase a maintenance manual for it. These can be found at most part stores, and run about 20 dollars. In it, you should find the exact location of the turn signal flasher unit.
  • Have it checked out. It could be the t/s switch Hazard (emergency) relay might need replacing. Our 97 sable has a problem with the emergency flasher switch on top of the steering column that also keeps the turn signals from flashing. Just pushing the button on and off many times has fixed it(temporarily and cheaply) twice over the last 5 years or so.
  • This happened to my '98 Mercury Sable. I had to replace the "Turn Signal Wiper Lever Switch." The part was about $75 and you can find it at some local auto parts stores (I got mine at a local NAPA). It took a bit of work to replace it, but it's not too hard.
  • I have the same problem in my 95 Ford Taurus. Checked the fuses and they were all okay. Next step was to find the flasher but after checking this problem out online, this is what I found. Most likely the problem is the multi-function switch. In the 95, it is located in the steering column. From others that have had this problem, I found you might get the switch working again by dismantling the switch and cleaning the contacts. You can also find one in a junkyard to replace the broken one but you'll have to remove it yourself to save any money.
  • Most likely it is your turn signal flasher,and it should be located close by the fuse panel. It will be round and looks like a short battery and it may be plastic or metal.
  • Check the flasher for your emergency flasher.There are two flasher units, one for turn and one for emergencies.
  • Most likely a bad turn signal flasher Could also be a bad switch in the steering column.
  • I would think the first thing to check would be the fuses. Your owners' manual should provide a fuse diagram, there is likely to be one on the fuse box cover.
  • Check for bad flasher (usually under dash) and also check for bad fuse in fuse block.
  • I took a suggestion from one of our farmers, I sprayed WD 40 on top and around the flasher which is located on top of the steering wheel column. I checked the flasher the next day and it worked beautifully.
  • Usually I just replace the multi-function switch, assuming it isn't a bad bulb. A bad bulb would be too obvious, though.
458459460
Ford Taurus
Starters and Ignition Systems
Mercury Sable

How do you replace the ignition switch cylinder in a Ford Taurus - Mercury Sable?

I am not completely sure how to do this myself, but I can get you started as I am researching this question myself. Haynes manual doesn't say how to replace the electronic switch. You may or may not be able to figure this out better than me and the rest of the way if I get you started.

Getting the lock cylinder out

The first part is really quite easy I found out. I know you have to disconnect the battery first so the car will not turn on, and so the air bags will not be triggered, and to protect the electrical system.

Then turn the ignition key to the run position and at the same time press the lock pin in that is on the bottom of the lock on the bottom of the column right under the position of the key lock.

Now while doing all of this pull the lock cylinder out. You may have to move the lock back and forth to get the pin to depress. Use a small 1/8 inch punch or screwdriver to press it in. You will notice that the back of the lock mechanism goes through the switch and they turn together when attached.

Now take the the top and bottom covers off of the steering column. I have a feeling the switch is under the top cover and easy to get to with a couple of screws holding it in.

From other experiences with different types of cars you may have to take the steering wheel off to get inside the column. To do that take the screws out from behind the steering wheel which hold the airbag mechanism in place on the front of the steering wheel. Be gentle and careful not to discharge the airbag. Next there is a bolt in the center of the steering wheel to remove. Depending on which method I just mentioned, those are the two ways u may need to use.

The ignition (electrical) switch is located on the steering column and most times on the bottom. Remove the panel from the drivers side to expose the steering column. There should be two torx screws holding it in place. Remove the screws and pull down, remove the wiring harness and take to your local parts distributor. Don't forget to disconnect the battery prior to starting and electrical project.

For a 96 - 99 Sable disconnect the battery cables wait two minutes, then turn ignition key lock cylinder to the run position, insert a 1/8 inch pin punch or cylinder tool into the hole at the bottom of the steering column cover surrounding the lock cylinder. Depress the punch while pulling out on the lock cylinder which will remove it from the column housing.

Replacing a Not-Working Lock Cylinder
  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2. Remove the upper and lower steering column covers.
  3. Insert a 0.125 drill bit in the hole at the top of the cylinder housing and drill out the retaining pin.

    NOTE Be careful! Don't drill anything but the pin hole straight in

  4. Remove the lock cylinder
  5. Clean out all the metal shavings
To Install:
  1. Turn the new lock cylinder to accessory position
  2. Press and hold the retainer pin in, insert the lock cylinder into the housing.

    Test it out and put everything back together - don't forget the battery cable too.

  3. Turn the key to the OFF position the release the retaining pin and lock it in

Remove lower bevel cover and turn ignition to run position,depress pin in bottom of switch and pull

If it will turn with the key in it you turn it and turn your steering wheel, look either under or straight ahead for a little button type thing that you must push in and pull out the cylinder, either that or you must drill your cylinder so you can turn it, or use a puller and pull out the inside of the cylinder, then find the button to pull out the housing.

455456457
Ford Taurus
Mercury Sable
Heater Cores and Blower Fans

Why does your Ford Taurus - Mercury Sable heater blower not work?

Recall and Technical Service Bulletin
The body style that ran from about '99-'03 had a issue with rain water getting into the blower case and ruining the blower resister assembly and the blower motor. There is a modified cowl cover that is supposed correct this condition. One tell tale sign that you have this problem is pull the blower resister assembly out and examine it. If it has corrosion or rust on the terminals, you have this problem. Replace the resister assembly, blower motor, and cowl cover.


There is a detailed posting on this problem in the "Related Links" below
If the blower is completely dead and is not providing any air movement, the cause could be in the resistor block for the fan motor, the fuse, or the fan motor.

Check the fuse first. Refer to the owners manual for the fuse. (see "Related Questions" below)

If you have one or more blower speeds, the problem is the resistor block.

The Ford Taurus blower has a resistor block that controls the various speeds of the blower motor. It is located on the passenger compartment side of the blower housing and can be replaced in five minutes. Unfortunately, I could only find the part at the Ford dealership who ripped me off for $20. You can find the part online for around $10.

If you do not have any speeds, you should verify the fan motor works by pulling it and connecting it to a 12 volt DC power source.

To pull the fan motor, you will have to remove the glove box to gain access to the 3 or 4 screws that hold the fan in place, although I did it without removing the glove box. The motor is attached to a large mounting plate that is at the bottom of the air plenum located behind the glove box. If you look up from the passenger floor you will see the motor hanging down. It is about the size of a soup can and is attached to a larger mounting plate. Once the connector is disconnected and the screws are out, you will have to turn the mounting plate to allow the motor to drop. Pay attention to the position as you pull it down as it needs to go back in the same twisting fashion.

I used a spare auto battery to test the motor, but you could use the one in the car, but just be careful to not short things out. Also, really brace the motor prior to connecting to battery as it has a lot of torque and could twist out of your hand.

If the motor is good and really spins up, then the problem is the resistor block is completely dead. (Replace it the resistor block.)

If the fan does not spin, you can get a replacement from any junk yard as they are the same part from the late 90's to the end of the Taurus. The parts guy at the yard can determine compatibility. Make sure he tests the fan before you buy it. Should cost about $10 - $15.
I repaired my fan by working it out of the housing, and freeing it up with WD-40. i then greased it up and it is fine, but I would recommend just getting a junk yard replacement. (much more time efficient!)

NOTE: a brand new motor is only $45 or so. With warranty.

AnswerBlown fuse, bad switch, defective resistor pack, or a bad fan motor.


See "Related Questions" below for more
Answer

If the blower motor is the problem, it should make noise or fail to work until you hit it with a hammer.

If the blower resistor is the problem, the blower should work only when set to the highest speed.
First things first. On your instrument panel, if you turn on the fan and nothing happens, you can be pretty sure it's your blower motor. The a/c and heat share the same blower, so if both won't blow that's probably your problem. I would doubt it's the switch. Those things just don't go too often, and it's more work than it's worth to take off the dash to get to it. I would bet it's the blower, as those go frequently in this model- bless the people at ford. I have the same car and had to do this last year. Go purchase a repair manual at your local auto store ($15). It's well worth it. This repair is pretty easy and you CAN do it yourself in an hour our so by following the directions in the manual- I promise, even if you don't know a socket from a screwdriver. Your blower motor, if that's what the problem truly is, is located behind your glove compartment. You can see it if you push in the tabs on each side of your glove and lower it down; don't worry you won't break them. A blower motor is $40 or so. It's easy access, very simple to do and will get you back on track. Just be sure to disconnect your neg battery terminal before you do any work. However, if the problem is your heater core you may want to get someone to help fix that if you're not mechanically inclined. If it is the core you can always just turn your blower on vent and get the hot air from the engine in the winter. Best of luck.
replace the fan motor relay.
Amen to the first answer. Same thing happened to me a few weeks ago on my Taurus. Had to replace blower motor. Labor, parts cost $142.00. Mechanic warned me to keep all switches in the off position when I bring it to car wash. Water gets sucked into the blower motor housing, apparently even it car is off. Go figure. im my experience i have found that water leaks into the blower motor from the area of the cabin air filter and the water shorts the motor out. you may check with your local Ford dealer because there might be a recall on this issue. good luck I HAVE A 2001 FORD TAURUS SES AND THE BLOWER STOPPED WORKING ON IT. I PUT 2 NEW BLOWERS IN IT. THE FORD DEALER COULD NOT FIND THE PROBLEM. SO I TOOK IT TO A BODY SHOP AND HE FOUND A LEAK IN THE CABIN AIR FILTER HE FIXED IT HAVE NOT HAD ANY MORE PROBLEMS. if their is water in the blower motor ford has a tsb (technical service bulliten) to replace the blower motor, blower motor switch, the passanger side cowl panel and a new weatherstrip. check with you local dealer.
Blown blower motor fuse? Bad blower motor? Bad blower motor resistor? Blower Relay?

419420421
Ford Taurus
Mercury Sable
Turn Signals and Hazard Lights

Where is the hazard turn signal flasher unit located and how do you change it on a 1986-1995 Taurus Sable?

Flasher Location

  • It's located on top off the fuse panel under the dash on the driver side.
  • Turn signal/ flasher relay is behind left end of instrument panel above the fuse box
Might not be your flasher I was asking this same question about my 95 Ford Taurus. If your problem is your signal and hazard lights not working and you've checked your fuses, the next logical step would be to find the flasher. On looking up this question myself I found that the problem usually wasn't the flasher but the multifunction switch located on the steering column. The best answer I found so far was to spray some WD40 under the hazard warning light switch behind the steering wheel. Operate the switch on and off about a dozen times, then operate the turn-signal switch left and right about a dozen times. Add some more WD40 and let it sit a few minutes. Try again. It should begin to work. One location of the flasher was under the dash to the left of the steering wheel. It was described as a blue plastic cube. Don't know if yours looks like that or not. Hope this helped at least a little.

Answer If it is like my 98 Grand Marquis, it is incorporated within the hazard flasher switch on top of the steering column. Before spending money to get it repaired, try squirting some WD 40 around the switch and push it down and let it pop up several times and wiggle it around. It worked for me when my flashers, turn signals, and brake lights stop working. Apparently, over the years gunk finds it way in there, be it dirt, liquids, etc. Pressing the flasher switch can sometimes initiate the problem. I don't believe there is a plug-in "flasher" you can replace as you may remember in older vehicles.

418419420
Car Fuses and Wiring
Mercury Sable

Where can I find Taurus - Sable wiring and vacuum diagrams?

Wiring diagrams

A couple of sources of detailed electrical wiring diagrams come to mind:

* Autozone.com provides free access to an extensive "Repair Guide" which includes many wiring diagrams

* Manuals & dedicated wiring diagram books - Chilton's, Haynes, Mitchell are 3 big names in the area of vehicle repair information

* The local library will have many of these manuals on the shelf - TIP: take a few dollars in coins to feed the copy machine

Not likely to find it anywhere but in a Ford factory service manual. You do have a owners manual for fuses and such that will get to most problems.

You can go to Autozone.com. They have online manuals you can view for free, you just have to enter the make and model of the vehicle you are inquiring about

http://www.commandocaralarms.com/wiring/1998-/Ford/Windstar/1810.HTML

Though is it is not complete, it is the best that I can find so far.

Haynes Manual would be your best option here. It's about $16 at auto store.

i have a 96 merc. sable. the Taurus is basically the same, but my fuse box is under the steering wheel on the bottom of the dash where all of the wires are. try to look under the dash on the left side. hope this helps. the diagram is there or in the manual. My 1996 ford Taurus has a fuse box in the front engine compartment above the radiator. However, it is not clear what each is for? Chilton repair manual has most electrical diagrams and can be purchased for almost all cars at autozone. Chiltons can also be contacted on-line and definitely have what you need.

Try MOTORLIT.COM Another source is Autozone.com - they have free access to Chilton's Repair Guide, which includes many wiring diagrams.

NOTE: Autozone now requires free registration to access the repair guides. More than worth the extra effort for these photo/illustrated instructions.

One source of some wiring diagrams is Autozone.com - they provide free access to an extensive Repair Guide (Chilton's?), including many wiring diagrams.

NOTE: Autozone now requires free registration to access the Repair Guides.

In a haynes manual available at NAPA stores.

Try AutoZone.com They have some wiring info. Also you can get manuals from Mercury but this could be a bit expensive.

http://www.autozone.com/AZ/cds/en_us/0900823d/80/1a/fc/3c/0900823d801afc3c/repairInfoPages.htm

Hope this is some help.

A 1997 Taurus owner.

389390391
Ford Taurus
Ford Explorer
Mercury Sable

What are some basic steps to diagnosing ABS brake warning lights on Taurus - Sable?

ABS, anti-lock brake systems are actually pretty basic:

  • Control module
  • Wheel sensor / 'exciter' ring (toothed gear integrated into end of axle shaft)
Diagnostics
  • Examine each wheel for physical problems
  • **
    • Mud & debris on the ring that could interfere with the sensor
    • Wiring - broken, frayed, corroded
    • Wiring connector - disconnected, corroded
  • Trouble codes
  • **
    • requires specialized scan tool (about $200)
    • As with engine codes, will provide more detailed information for diagnostics - such as a recurring code to a specific wheel as in my case.
    • Appears that most places charge to have codes read - I paid $45 at my favorite tire shop. Dealers, brakes shops, tire shops, some auto parts offer ABS scan / code retrieval
Repair
  • Wheel sensor
    • Sensor mounts into the back side of the steering knuckle with one small bolt. Can be stuck in the casting and take some effort to remove in one piece (in case you're trying to salvage it). Be patient and have good penetrating oil on hand.
    • Trace wiring - the front connectors are typically up behind the plastic wheel well liner for protection from the road elements - lots of sheet metal screws & more penetrating oil
    • Individual sensors range in price from about $45 and up
  • Control module
  • **
    • Not repairable and expensive (that's about all I know)
  • Bleeding the system
    • ABS systems are particularly sensitive to air in the lines - the control module gets upset by the presence of anything but fluid.
    • According to Chiltons procedure write-up, the ABS scanner needs to be used during bleeding process
    • The bleeding sequence goes Rt Ft, Lf Ft, Lf R, Rt R
    • sounds like it is a complete flushing of fluid - have a few jugs of fluid on hand

See "Related Questions" below for more ABS information

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Air Conditioning and Coolant
Ford Taurus
Mercury Sable
Ford Expedition XLT

Where is the low side valve on a 3.0 Sable - Taurus air conditioning?

Be advised that I own and service a 2000 Taurus 3.0L OHV engine. The low side valve is located at the rear firewall near the right side \ passenger side strut tower and has a black plastic cap similar to a tire valve stem cap. Stay away from the high pressure side which on my vehicle is at the front right near the radiator. Not certain but believe R-12 Freon was being phased out about 1992 and the new refrigerant is R134a. You need of course to know what your AC system requires, R-12, or R134a. Then appropriate charging kit to add refrigerant.



Its located on the evaporator to accumulator suction line under the cowl panel...............
Buy a kit at Wal-Mart or auto parts comes with instructions
on the pasinger side there should be a silver looking tank on top there is a cap that is black pull off there is a thing that looks like a air valve on a tire get the recharge bottle from auto zone and put it on there
Follow the larger hose from the compressor - perhaps near the drier on the passenger side firewall
The low pressure port on a Ford Taurus is located next to the firewall. If you are looking from the front of the car, the port is on the far left side of the engine compartment.
The fill orfice is located near the aluminum "cylinder" near the firewall on the passenger side of the car, it is beneath the plastic shround near the firewall. This is the low pressure side of the system. Do not try and fill through the the high press. side located near the radiator! Wear safety googles!
on the passenger side firewall behind plastic sheild.
There is a big hose and a small hose at the compressor. The big hose is the low pressure.
Where is the low pressure side of the ac system on a 1999 ford taurus?" low pressure side is located near the fire wall on the left side.
Not hard at all, just buy the recharge kit at the auto parts store and follow the directions. The kit will only attach to the low side so you cannot make that mistake. The low pressure port will be near the compressor on a larger hose and will have a screw on cap with the letter L on it.
passenger side near the fire wall. the only one the freon hose fits.
It contains no Freon. It contains R-134. If it is low, you have a leak, that must be repaired before adding refrigrant. Take it to a professional.
There is a valve that looks like a tire air port that is located under the hood directly in front of the passenger seat. It is located on the right of the air compressor, in front of the fire wall. There should be a screw cap on top of the port. Crank your AC to the highest it will go, flip the cap on your refill, attach it to the port, shake can, and press.

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