Olympics Baseball

This category is for questions relating to baseball at the Olympics which includes origins, games, scores of games, players, teams, records and much more.

243 Questions
Baseball
Baseball History
Olympics Baseball

What is the largest number of teams a single professional baseball player has played for?

Mike Morgan, a pitcher whose career spanned 1978-2002, pitched for 12 different teams during his career. Those teams were the Yankees, Athletics, Blue Jays, Mariners, Orioles, Dodgers, Cubs, Cardinals, Reds, Twins, Rangers, and Diamondbacks. Click on the 'Career Stats for Mike Morgan' link for more information.

Ron Villone, a pitcher whose career spans 1995-2009, has tied Morgan's record for appearing with 12 different MLB Teams. In order, Villone has pitched for the Mariners, Padres, Brewers, Indians, Reds, Rockies, Astros, Pirates, Marlins, Yankees, Cardinals, and Nationals.

Deacon McGuire (primarily a Catcher; 1884-1912) also played for 12 teams: Toledo, Cleveland (American Association), Rochester, Washington (American Association), Detroit, Philadelphia, Washington (National League), Brooklyn, Detroit (American League), New York, Boston and Cleveland (American League). McGuire is usually credited with having played with only 11 teams because the Washington Statesmen of the American Association in 1891 became the Washington Senators of the National League in 1892.

Matt Stairs, 1B/OF/DH, has played for 12 different teams during his career. Those teams were, in order, the Montreal Expos, Boston Red Sox, Oakland Athletics, Chicago Cubs, Milwaukee Brewers, Pittsburgh Pirates, Kansas City Royals, Texas Rangers, Detroit Tigers, Toronto Blue Jays, Philadelphia Phillies, and San Diego Padres. Stairs is still active playing for the Padres.

Miguel Cairo has played for 11 teams, but he has played for a few clubs twice (New York Yankees, Cardinals, and Cubs) making it 12 teams. The teams are the yankees, blue jays, cubs, rays, mets, cardinals, marniners, phillies, and reds. Miguel Cairo is still active, and he is playing for the Cincinnati Reds as a utility player.

Octavio Dotel, P, has played with 12 teams and just signed with his 13th: The Tigers. The teams he has played for, in order, are: Mets, Astros, A's, Yankees, Royals, Braves, White Sox, Pirates, Dodgers, Rockies, Blue Jays, Cardinals, and now the Tigers

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Olympics Baseball

When did baseball become a Olympic event?

In 1992

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Baseball
Pittsburgh Pirates
Olympics Baseball
Jackie Robinson

What year did Jackie Robinson play for the Pittsburgh Pirates?

Robinson spent his entire MLB career, 1947-1956, with the Brooklyn Dodgers. Maybe you're getting Robinson confused with Roberto Clemente.

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Baseball
Baseball Rules and Regulations
Olympics Baseball

What is the regulation height for a pitchers mound?

According to Major League Baseball rules, the peak of the mound (where the pitching rubber sits) must be ten and 1/2 inches above the level of home plate (MLB Rule 1.04). The degree of slope from an area six inches in front of the rubber is one inch to one foot (this is in the direction of the plate), and must be uniform. The pitching rubber is legally defined in the rules as the "pitcher's plate".

Although the rules do not specifically say so, it stands to reason that the slope on the back of the mound must be steeper, since the mound is circular and the rubber is toward the back of the mound. The diameter of the mound is 18 feet.

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Softball
Baseball Rules and Regulations
Olympics Baseball

During an at bat can a switch hitter change sides of the plate?

Yes, the player may surely switch sides; he may do so as long as the pitcher is not in the "ready position" (see rule 6.06),and, shall be called out if the batter attempts to switch sides during the pitcher's windup.(Incidentally, there has always been a popular myth in the baseball culture that a batter can only switch sides before there are two strikes. This is just a false statement). Read your baseball rulebook!

Yes, he can. It usually happens when the opposing team changes pitchers. Generally, left-handed hitters hit better against right-handed pitchers (and vice versa), so if a switch hitter is batting left-handed against a right-handed pitcher, and the other team changes to a lefty in the middle of the at-bat, the switch hitter will usually move to the right side of the plate to counter this.

There is no rule in the MLB rule book that states how many times a batter can switch sides during an at bat. However, once the pitcher steps on the rubber, whatever side the batter is on is the side he must bat from for that pitch.

Per above, there is no rule in the rulebook that states that he cannot change from one batter's box to the other in the middle of an at-bat. The only rule about switching boxes is 6.06b which says that he cannot switch boxes if the pitcher is in the ready position. Otherwise, no problem.

yeah they can i have done it before

addendum - PBUC 'Pat Venditte rule' Pitcher must indicate which arm he will use to throw the next pitch and then the batter must take either box. I am not sure what rule number in the PBUC that this falls under. If anyone has it please add it for me.

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Football - Soccer
Soccer History
Olympics Baseball

What year did soccer become an official sport?

i think it became official in 1908

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Baseball Memorabilia
Olympics Baseball

What is the value of a Reach baseball that is in mint condition and has never been taken out of the bag?

The value is dependent solely on the particular League Commissioner whose name is stamped on the ball and whose name should appear on all packaging. The older, the more valuable. $50-150 would be the norm, based on era. Some time around 1876, Albert G. Spalding and his brother, J. Walter Spalding, obtained the right to produce the official National League baseball, which they would continue to produce for the next 100 years. The American League, formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs combined with the National league in 1901 to form Major League baseball. Alfred James Reach, owner of The Reach sporting Goods company, sold his company to Spalding in 1889. Spalding continued to use the Reach label produced American League baseballs beginning in 1901. American League baseballs with the Reach Trademark had Red & Blue stitching, and the National League Spalding Trademark baseballs had Black & Red stitching up until about 1934/35 when in both league started using only red stitching. Spalding along with the Reach label was producing Major league baseball for about 100 years until Rawlings took over around 1970, and Rawlings have been making major league baseballs ever since. Your baseball could be worth anywhere between $500. -$1,200. depending on the date the baseball was manufactued without the original bag. The League President whose name is stamped on the ball will help date the baseball, along with the trademarks stamped on the ball. The fact that the baseball came in a bag might date the ball to an early era. See Related Links below for more information, pictures, and price guide for Official Major League baseballs. The page will be up dated soon with pictures, and more precise dating.

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Basketball History
Cows and Cattle
Olympics Baseball

Why are there only fifteen players on a team now instead of eighteen?

Because They want to save there money for better stuff Actually, only twelve players are on an Official NBA Roster at a time. No you are both wrong it is because eighteen people is to much no sh*t you mo mo!

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Baseball
Baseball Rules and Regulations
Olympics Baseball

What is the name for the pitcher's mound rubber?

It is called the rubber. Slab is the slang word for the pitcher's rubber. If you were to go to a sporting goods store to buy one, you would ask for a pitcher's rubber.

Another answer:The proper name is the pitcher's plate.
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Baseball
Baseball History
Olympics Baseball

When did professional baseball players first play exhibition games outside the US?

in the 1930's the majors leaguers played exhibitions in Japan. players like Babe Ruth went and played. some say one or some of the ball players were asked by the government to take pictures of sights while they were in Japan. Kind of a goodwill spy system

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Softball
Baseball Rules and Regulations
Olympics Baseball

Can a switch hitter change sides during a time at bat?

A batter can change sides of the plate as many times as they choose. Just like a manager can change pitchers as many times as they choose.

No a batter cannot change sides, unless the opposing team brings in a new pitcher that throws with the other hand.

Although managers may make unlimited batter substitutions, the same does not apply to pitchers. Unless he is injured, once a pitcher is brought into a game, he must face at least one batter before he can be taken out. The hitter can switch sides if there is a pitching change, but he can only do it once.

Where is the rule in MLB that states a batter cannot switch sides multiple times when batting? I have seen this answer countless times and no one specifies a rule.

UPDATED INFORMATION:

There is no official rule governing this issue. All the rule books state is that a batter cannot switch sides at the plate when the pitcher is set to deliver a pitch. This means that he/she may switch as often as he/she would like as long as the pitcher is not in his/her motion. There is nothing stating the number of times that he/she may switch sides at a single at bat. That is only a myth.

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Baseball
Baseball History
Olympics Baseball

What country played baseball first?

Japan. You may think of baseball as one of America’s most beloved pastimes, but it’s also immensely popular in Japan, where it was first introduced all the way back in the 1870s by Horace Mann, an American school teacher in Tokyo. During the same decade, engineer Hiroshi Hiraoka came home from studying in the United States and launched the first organized Japanese baseball team, the Shimbashi Athletic Club, in 1878. Over the next several decades the sport swept through Japan, with teams being established at schools and universities across the country. The 1934 Major League All-Star tour of Japan was led by Babe Ruth, with a roster including Lou Gehrig, Jimmie Foxx, Charlie Gehringer, Earl Averill, Lefty Gomez, Lefty O’Doul, and Moe Berg. On that tour the Japanese team lost all 18 games, but the excitement for the sport didn’t dim. Professional teams were formed in the 1930s, but the league really took off after the end of World War II. Today the Japanese Professional Baseball League consists of two leagues with six teams each, and millions of Japanese fans follow the sport closely.

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Olympics Baseball

What country has won the most Olympic gold medals for baseball?

Since baseball became an Olympic sport in the 1992 Olympics, Cuba has won three gold medals and the United States has won one.

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Olympics Baseball

What was the name of the gold medal Native American athlete who also played pro baseball and football?

Jim Thorpe

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Basketball
Basketball History
Olympics Baseball
Olympics Basketball

Which female professional basketball player is the first USA basketball player ever to play on four Olympic teams?

Teresa Edwards

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Baseball
Baseball History
Olympics Baseball
Beijing 2008 Olympics

Who made the most runs in baseball in the Olympics?

Japan made the most runs in baseball in the Olympic game.

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Baseball
Olympics
Olympics Baseball

Is baseball an official Olympic sport?

Yes, it debuted as an official Olympic sport during the 1992 Barcelona Olympic games. Both baseball and softball have been eliminated as an Olympic game after the 2008 Games in Beijing. There will be no baseball or softball at the 2012 Games. There is a possibility they could make a come back at the 2016 Games but that has not been decided yet.

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Baseball
Baseball Equipment
Olympics Baseball

What are the names of the positions in baseball?

  • 1: Pitcher
  • 2: Catcher
  • 3: First Baseman
  • 4: Second Baseman
  • 5: Third Baseman
  • 6: Short Stop
  • 7: Left Fielder
  • 8: Center Fielder
  • 9: Right Fielder

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Olympics
Olympics Baseball
London 2012 Olympics

What country was barred from competing in the 1924 and 1948 Winter and Summer Olympics?

Germany

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Baseball
Baseball Rules and Regulations
Olympics Baseball

Who are the officials at a baseball game?

The officials in a baseball game are called umpires. During the regular season, there are four umpires at every game, one at each of the bases and one behind home plate that calls balls and strikes. During the playoffs, two extra umpires work each game. One of the extra umpires is stationed behind third base down the left field line and the other is stationed behinf first base down the right field line.

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Baseball
Baseball History
Olympics Baseball

Who was the shortest professional baseball player?

Eddie Gaedel, all 3' 7" of him, is the shortest player to have ever played in MLB when he was sent up to pinch hit in a game between the St. Louis Browns and Detroit Tigers on August 19, 1951.

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Softball
Baseball Rules and Regulations
Olympics Baseball

Can a batter who is a switch hitter change which side of the plate he hits from during a single at-bat?

no

Wrong!! The batter may switch sides of the plate as long as the pitcher is not on the rubber prepared to pitch. He could switch several times during the at-bat.

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Baseball
Baseball History
Olympics Baseball

Who are the greatest baseball players in the US?

My opinion: 1. Barry Bonds 2. Alex Rodriguez 3. Albert Pujols 4. Roger Clemens 5. Andruw Jones

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Jackie Robinson
Los Angeles Dodgers
Olympics Baseball

What year did Jackie Robinson play for Brooklyn Dodgers?

April 6, 1944

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Baseball
Olympics Baseball

When was baseball originated?

1931 The answer depends on what you call "baseball", but whatever you call it, it did not originate in 1931. In the 15th Century (and possibly earlier), there was a game, commonly played in England, called "stoolball", which has many similarities to baseball, and is considered the common ancestor of baseball, cricket, and rounders. Rounders, which also originated in England, in the 18th century or earlier, is also considered an ancestor of baseball. The earliest-known use of the term "base-ball" was in a 1744 British publication, which included an illustration of a field that was similar to a modern baseball field layout, but with only three bases instead of four, and with vertical posts serving as the bases. The first known American reference to baseball was a 1791 law in Pittsfield, MA, forbidding the playing of the game near the town's newly-built meeting house (presumably to avoid broken windows), though it is uncertain what the rules of this game were. A 1796 German book describes "englische Base-ball" as a contest between two teams in which "the batter has three attempts to hit the ball while at home plate". In the 1830s, a sport more closely resembling modern baseball was played in the US. Some players actually called it "base-ball", but it was more commonly referred to as "townball". Though more closely related to modern baseball than any of the earilier forms, there remained crucial differences that would prevent most people from calling this game "baseball". There were four bases, and the object of was to reach the fourth or "home" base. But batters could be put out by catching a hit ball either on the fly or after one bounce, while runners could be put out by hitting them with a thrown ball (known as "soaking" or "plugging" the runner), or, in some rules, by even throwing the ball across the runner's path in front of him. The concept of "innings" was used, with both teams taking turns on offense and defense, but the number of innings in a game varied, as did the number of outs required per inning (in some cases one out was required, while in others, all batters on a team had to be put out) In 1845, Alexander Cartwright first codified the rules of baseball, known as the "Knickerbocker Rules". These rules barred "soaking" the runner, but still called it an "out" when a hit ball was caught after one bounce. Also, the pitcher had to throw underhanded, and there was no rule specifying where the pitcher had to pitch from. The field layout was nearly identical to modern baseball, though the distances were specified in "paces" rather than feet, but given a standard 3-foot "pace", it's pretty close to 90 feet between bases. Rather than a set number of "innings", teams played until one team reached 21 "aces" (runs), with the caveat that, at the end of the game, both teams had the same number of turns at bat (which were called "hands" rather than innings). These rules introduce the concept of a "foul" ball, and defined it similarly to its current definition, but including a ball hit between first and third base but so far away as to be outside of the field of play (which we now call a "home run"). However, fouls were not strikes until 1858, and foul bunts were not strikes until 1894. In fact, strikes could only be called when the batter actually made an attempt to hit a pitched ball and failed to make contact - there was no such thing as a "strike zone" or a "called strike". Three strikes was an out, just like today, but there were no "balls" (non-strikes), and thus no "base on balls", until 1863. Three outs ended a half-inning, just like today. Early improvements on the "Knickerbocker Rules" created a gradual progression to something even more akin to modern baseball. Establishing fouls as strikes (1858), establishing a "strike zone" and "called strikes" (1858), establishing "balls" and "bases on balls" (1863), and requiring that a hit ball be caught on the fly, rather than after one bounce, were the most important such improvements. So, by 1863, the rules (if not the strategy, character, and culture) of the game was much the same as it is today, with the sole major exception being that the ball was still pitched underhanded. The first fully professional baseball club was the 1869 Cincinatti Red Stockings, and the first professional baseball "league" was the National Association of Professional Base Ball Players, which lasted from 1871 to 1875. But most baseball scholars consider "Major League Baseball" to have begun in 1876, when the National League (the same one still in existence today) was formed. 1884 saw the legalization of overhanded pitching. Since that time, rule changes have been minor (in scope at least, if not effect). However, the strategy, character, and culture of baseball are arguably much different today than back then. Home runs became a major factor in the 1930s as fields were reduced in size to accomodate outfield seating and strict regulation of how baseballs were constructed led a consistently more "lively" ball. Desegregation of Major League baseball began in the late 1940s. The acceptance and adoption of the curveball and other non-straight pitches made the game less offense-oriented and drastically increased the importance of pitching. And, of course, television has forever changed the financial aspects of the game, at least at the professional level. So, again, it depends on what you call "baseball". If you want to be absolutely strict and say it has to be indentical, in every detail, to the modern game, then "baseball" is reinvented every season, as there are, almost invariably, some minor rule changes every year. Personally, I would date the origin of "modern baseball" to 1884, when overhand pitching was legalized, but credit the 15th-century "stoolball" as the first recognizably similar version of today's game.

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