Democracy

Democracy is a type of government characterized by a "rule of the people." In most democracies, citizens are equal and have the ability to vote for their political leaders.

Asked in US Constitution, Democracy

Who is the father of modern democracy?

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The father of modern democracy was John Locke.
Asked in Democracy

What can help mature Indian democracy?

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The three measures which can help Indian democracy mature can be: One language by birth, Free health care from birth and Abolish caste basis of birth. P.S.- ...or else hand over to the British once again!
Asked in US Presidents, Definitions, Political Theory, Democracy

What is the irony of democracy?

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Democracy implies that every single citizen gets a "voice" and/or a vote, however due to the large population it would be impossible for everyone to have a voice for every single issue (this would simply slow down the voting process and little would ever get done), instead democracy is more of a republic with people being "represented" by those who share their same ideals. Also, as "irony" means that the result is opposite to what the original expressed idea explicitly stated, not only is the fact that the United States was specifically NOT designed as a pure democracy (but, rather as a representative republic), but also the fact that virtually all democracies are explicitly designed to prevent absolute majority rule, which is what a true democracy means. That is, as a true democracy means the rule of the majority of citizens, all modern democratic political systems instead have designed-in limitations preventing the majority from having absolute power. The irony here is that small numbers of people (e.g. the US Supreme Court) can block attempts by the majority (even a vast majority) of citizens to take certain actions (in particular, modern democracies protect the rights of minorities from the actions of majorities). This is a Good Thing, though ironic. In the case of the United States, the original Constitution (including the Bill of Rights) has several ironies (i.e. places where the design of the government contradicts the idea of a pure or representative democracy): Leaving aside the fact that it is NOT a pure democracy, but rather a representative democracy, the original Constitution only allows for direct election of members of the House of Representatives. The US Senate was appointed, and very much designed to be similar to the UK's aristocratic House of Lords. Also, the US President was not be to directly elected (and, still isn't), rather the Electoral College was used as an indirect method, one which was only marginally obligated to follow voter's desires. Almost 75% of the total population was excluded from voting: Native Americans, non-whites (specifically, slaves, but in practice, many non-white free men), women, and everyone under at least 21 (plus, many states had landholding or wealth requirements). Immigrants were explicitly excluded from attaining the highest office (US President). Only original citizens were allowed to be President, not naturalized ones. This stricture remains to this day. Large chunks of the Executive and Judicial branches were designed in a manner which insulates or removes them from direct voter approval, and much from even indirect voter approval. No mechanism for leaving the United States exists, which, presumably for a Federation of individual sovereign states, should exist in a real democracy
Asked in Political Theory, Democracy

What is the role of the people in a democracy?

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In order for a democracy to work, it is important that the people have knowledge about the definition of democracy and how it works. Thus, it is highly important for a country to have an educated population in order for the democratic system to work. This is important because uneducated people tend to lean towards radical ideologies as these ideologies might seem to have a sufficient solution to the problems of the society, however what people usually fail to see or even ignore is that these solution are based on suppression of other groups in society which usually doesn't affect the majority. Another important point in educating the people about the definition of democracy is that they usually tend to understand the word wrong. An example of that is that many people tend to regard democracy as a system where everything literally is allowed, this often lead to a complete chaos that devastates the order of the society rather than improving it and in that way, it leads to the opposite effect of the aims of democracy. The Role of the People The key role of citizens in a democracy is to participate in public life. Citizens have an obligation to become informed about public issues, to watch carefully how their political leaders and representatives use their powers, and to express their own opinions and interests. Voting in elections is another important civic duty of all citizens. But to vote wisely, each citizen should listen to the views of the different parties and candidates, and then make his or her own decision on whom to support. Participation can also involve campaigning for a political party or candidate, standing as a candidate for political office, debating public issues, attending community meetings, civic meetings, petitioning the government, and even protesting. A vital form of participation comes through active membership in independent, non-governmental organizations, what we call "civil society." These organizations represent a variety of interests and beliefs: farmers, workers, doctors, teachers, business owners, religious believers, women, students, human rights activists. "DEMOCRACY: Government by the people; a form of government in which the supreme power is vested in the people and exercised directly by them or by their elected agents under a free electoral system."
Asked in Countries, States, and Cities, International Government, Democracy

What are all of the democratic countries in the world?

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Argentina Australia Austria Belgium Benin Brazil Bulgaria Canada Cape Verde Chile Croatia Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Dominican Republic El Salvador Estonia Finland France Georgia Germany Ghana Greece Guatemala Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Ireland Israel Italy Japan Jamaica Kiribati Latvia Lesotha Lithuania Malaysia Mali Malta Mexico Micronesia Mongolia, Namibia The Netherlands New Zealand Nicaragua Norway Palau Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Romania Singapore Slovakia Slovenia South Africa South Korea Spain Suriname Sweden Thailand Taiwan Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tuvalu Ukraine United Kingdom United States of America Uruguay Soviet Russia
Asked in Democracy

How is a direct democracy different from a representative democracy?

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In a direct democracy, every single member of the group has an equal say in every single decision. This is not workable on a day to day basis for large groups. In a representative democracy, people elect representatives, who vote on the issues. Representative democracy is the basis of constitutional democracy. Representatives are chosen by the people to act in their best interest, not necessarily to vote the way the people want them to in every circumstance. Direct democracy is very difficult to maintain when a population becomes too large. Some societies operate with a combination of both types of democracy. For example, in some countries, such as France, Switzerland and the Republic of Ireland, some issues, for example, changes to the constitution, can be decided by a popular vote on that specific issue. In some of the small Swiss cantons (states) such as Glarus, all citizens are entitled to attend an annual meeting which votes retrospectively on the laws passed during the preceding year by their representatives. and also credit to the person who last posted this
Asked in Political Theory, Democracy

What is a parliamentary democracy?

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A parliamentary democracy means that the political power is held by an elected parliament representing the people. Election to govern with the elected candidate representing the combine will of the constituents who elected them to office.
Asked in US Constitution, Democracy

Why do you need rights in a democracy?

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Three reasons: To prevent the arbitrary exercise of power on individuals or groups. To allow for expression of freedom, in the sense that rights mark individuals are equal citizens with the power and responsibility to participate in government. To delineate the distribution of authority and formation of government to the people, who form the body of citizens.
Asked in Democracy

Is democracy suitable to all the nations?

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That is the question, isn't it? Certainly, you cannot simply and quickly force a nation to embrace democracy, any more than you can force it to do anything. The assumption often is that if the majority of people in a nation are oppressed and even badly abused, and if they want a change that they cannot seem to bring about, then democracy is a system that they should be free to try. But that has to be tempered by the reality that nations are sovereign states and can follow, within reason, the systems that history, traditions and the popular sentiment deem correct. The idea of 'forcing' democracy is contradictory. The other thing that has to be tempered by reality is the assumed legitimacy of oppressive and absolute theocracies that engage in atrocities against humanity in the name of a deity. Such theocracies concentrate all power and authority in the hands of a very few men who usually operate beyond the scope of any civil law, and certainly beyond the authority or control of the people governed. This is abhorrent to the minds of most who understand democracy, but even these systems can be part of the operations of some sovereign states.
Asked in Democracy

How is the United States a representative democracy?

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To answer the question, let's first define the important parts: A Democracy in its most simplest form means a system of government where individual citizens have a direct [and meaningful] vote in their government. There are many different kinds of democracies - variations on what is a citizen, who can vote, and who or what they vote for. However, the overarching characteristics of the democracy is that at least a majority of citizen have the power to vote, that they have a choice when voting, that their votes dictate the direction of government policy, and that the citizen is (reasonably) frequently called upon to vote on government matter. A Representative form of government is one where (some) citizens chose another citizen to make political decisions for them. That is, rather than a citizen being directly involved in politics and government, they chose a proxy to make their choice for them. Representative forms of government often have multiple layers of this action - a proxy is chosen at (say) the village level, then the village proxies get together and chose a county representative, who then may chose a regional proxy. How these representatives are initially picked depends on the actual system of government being used - voting is common, but not by any means universal. Combining these two definitions, you find that a representative democracy is a system where the majority of citizens vote for a proxy to represent them in government - such representatives then govern in the citizen's name, and are (at least occasionally) forced to go back to the citizen to be re-authorized (i.e. re-elected) to hold their position. The United States is a multi-faceted Representative Democracy: we elect representatives in many aspects of our government form, all of which have specific duties and limits on power. We periodically have elections to either retain or replace our representatives. And a majority of the population is allowed to vote (though sadly, less than half does).
Asked in Democracy

Why the press is the 'lighthouse of democracy'?

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a free and independent press is one of democracy's most important institutions.the press idealistically play a role in the instrument use of knowledge by enlightening the citizenry helping citizens to have an educated voice in the democratic process. the more diverse information voters receive the more accurate social valuations they can make. media is a powerful medium that disseminates information and influence public opinion.it is like beacon that guides the people to inform about their duties responsibilities policies.
Asked in US Government, Athens, Democracy

How is athenian democracy different from American democracy?

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Answer 1 Well, i know about 8 differences: 1. Athenians were divided into 10 tribes, however Americans are divided into 50 states 2. Athenians elected 50 men from each tribe, however Americans elect by population 3. Athenians had a direct democracy (participated directly), however Americans have a representative democracy (elect representatives) 4. Athenians had the Council of Five Hundred, however Americans have the Government 5. Athenians limited electing and voting rights to just men, however Americans have electing and voting rights to men and women 6. Athenians had slaves, however Americans don't have slaves (well, they used to until 1863 when all of the slaves were freed by Abraham Lincoln) 7. In Athens, women stayed at home and work, however in America, women participate in all kinds of daily activities, even in the Army 8. In Athens, slaves were just captured war prisoners, however in America, slaves were Africans who were treated as property due to their dark skin. Answer 2 Athenian democracy was not the Rule of the People, but the Rule of the Demos, hence the name. Many people living in ancient Greece were not part of the demos, most prominently of course, slaves. Also, just about everything else. Answer 3 There are two key differences between the type of democracy practices in ancient Athens, and modern American democracy. Firstly (and, the largest difference), the Athenians practiced direct democracy - citizens were expected to vote themselves on topics facing the government (and courts). The United States is a representative democracy - citizens elect one citizen to act as their proxy (representative) in the larger government. Secondly, citizenship in ancient Athens was significantly more restrictive, and far less than the majority of residents of Athens held citizenship. Athenian citizenship was based on age, gender, and to a certain extent tribal membership and wealth, with the right to vote being even further restricted; in addition, Athens practiced slavery. American democracy is a form of universal suffrage, meaning that everyone is a citizen, and that the only real restriction on voting is a minimum age (though voting is restricted for certain peoples, mainly felons and the mentally incompetent). As to the actual implementation of the governments, Athenian and American government are radically different. See the links below for a better description of both forms of government, as the structural differences are too extensive to summarize here. Answer 4 Original Greek "democracy" and current American "democracy" have few differences. In the Greek form only the elite could participate in the process of important decisions. In the US form only tiny group of elitists may make important decisions. Neither of them are actually democracies. Democracy's original meaning was "the people" "to rule." It meant that the will of the majority of the governed would become the supreme law of the land. That condition has never existed within any country on Earth simply because humanity has never before had the technology to define the true will of a population regarding all the issues that may affect them.
Asked in Political Theory, The Difference Between, Democracy

What is the difference between a republic and a democracy?

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'Democracy' comes from the Greek words demos and kratos ('people power' or rule by the people'). It signifies a type of government where the people control or are the government, as opposed to rule a monarch (one ruler), a dictator (0ne ruler) or oligarchs (a few rulers). There are two general kinds of democracy: a direct democracy, where the people rule the country themselves (that is, they meet regularly and decide on laws and actions); or a representative democracy, where the people elect councillors to represent them in a ruling council. Many of the ancient Greek city-states and early New England colonies were direct democracies, while countries like the United States, Germany or France are far too large for direct democracy to be a viable option, so these countries use the representative democracy model instead. 'Republic' comes from Latin words res publica, meaning 'thing of the people'. It refers to any style of government where there is no monarch - that is, there is no king, no emperor, no shah, no sultan or any other similar position. In a monarchy, the government is effected by the monarch. So, for example, in the United Kingdom, Queen Elizabeth rules. However it is a 'constitutional monarchy, and the constitution effectively gives power to the parliament elected by the people. But in a republic, there is no such rule - the country is said to belong to 'the people' - but this can be via a president, a council or a parliament or a combination. This is what distinguishes it from a democracy - a republic can be a democracy or an oligarchy. So every democracy is a republic, but not every republic is a democracy. For example, the United States is both a democracy and a republic. Some countries are republics, but are not considered democracies. Examples include Nazi Germany, the People's Republic of China, the Democratic People's Republic of [North] Korea, and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. While not 'democratic' countries from a Western point of view, they are technically republics, since they had no monarchs and even had some form of elections. However, it's also a matter of perception - for example, North Korea calls itself a 'democratic people's republic' and tries to brainwash its people into believing that, but from an outside point of view, it is arguably the most undemocratic country in the world. By the same token, countries like the United Kingdom, Belgium, and Japan are not republics - since they each have a monarch of some kind (UK has a queen, Belgium has a king and Japan has an emperor), they are each technically a monarchy. However, they are each also considered to be a 'constitutional monarchy', because each has a constitution that gives real power to elected assemblies and the monarch's role is mostly ceremonial, coming into real play only when a constitutional crisis cannot be resolved by the elected assemblies and direction to resolve this is essential. So each of these has a government that resembles a representative democracy. So these various terms are largely superficial, and the only way to understand them is to examine the real practice of government in each country - looking behind the titles, words and pretenses, and arriving at the real effective forces of government. Development: The early experiments in democracy were carried out in Athens and other city-states in Greece. They tried Direct Democracy, where the citizens met fortnightly in assembly and voted on all issues and a council implemented them between meetings. Some rash decisions by the easily-swayed people brought about chaos and collapse, so later countries have used Representative Democracy where the citizens elect representatives to a parliament which directs the state on the citizens' behalf. While not perfect as the representatives play politics and self interest, it is also practical for the present as countries are much larger and assembly of citizens impracticable. Mass electronic communication can solve this, but politicians are not going to rush to a system which replaces them any time soon.
Asked in Democracy

What are characteristics of democracies?

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• Democracy is government in which power and civic responsibility are exercised by all adult citizens, directly, or through their freely elected representatives. • Democracy rests upon the principles of majority rule and individual rights. Democracies guard against all-powerful central governments and decentralize government to regional and local levels, understanding that all levels of government must be as accessible and responsive to the people as possible. • Democracies understand that one of their prime functions is to protect such basic human rights as freedom of speech and religion; the right to equal protection under law; and the opportunity to organize and participate fully in the political, economic, and cultural life of society. • Democracies conduct regular free and fair elections open to citizens of voting age. • Citizens in a democracy have not only rights, but also the responsibility to participate in the political system that, in turn, protects their rights and freedoms. • Democratic societies are committed to the values of tolerance, cooperation, and compromise. In the words of Mahatma Gandhi, "Intolerance is itself a form of violence and an obstacle to the growth of a true democratic spirit."
Asked in Democratic Party, Democracy

What is the importance of separation of power in a democratic society?

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Separation of powers between legislatures of government prevents any one legislature from having too much power. For example, before a president is allowed to declare a law, or sign a new bill, the action is first checked by Congress to verify its necessity and intent. Through a system called checks and balances, democracies such as America are able to ensure that each branch, whether it be judicial, executive, or legislative, all share the same amount of power. :)
Asked in Colonial America, Political Theory, Democracy

What features of colonial politics contributed to the development of popular democracy?

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America was founded in the Enlightenment Age giving its ideals a very progressive way of thinking. It was not so much as the political ways of colonial America that gave rise to a democratic republic, because that is truly what America is, but the age in which her founding father's were educated in. when George, Thomas, and John were attaining their degrees of higher education the likes of John Locke were being published on a wide spread basis. These books were read and re read and were tested on by students wanting to become lawyers or politicians in the 17th and 18th centuries. Enlightenment Age philosophers were the first to have their works published widespread and accessible to the masses, the majority of the population whom they strictly addressed in their books. This meant that the young minds of who would become our founding fathers were forever engraved with the beliefs of John Locke. Their idealistic beliefs of natural rights of every man instilled by such men like Locke enpowered them overthrow the oppressive rule of a monarchy and have a government "of the people, by the people and for the people".
Asked in Socialism, Capitalism, Democracy

What are the features of modern political thought?

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The major features of modern political thought are nation state,secularism,state sovereignty,democracy,nationalism,capitalism,socialism,liberalism and so on.
Asked in Politics and Government, US Constitution, Democracy

How is the Constitution democratic and undemocratic?

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The constitution created a republic. A republic is a form of democracy, but slightly different from a pure democracy. To increase its appeal to smaller states the Constitution was created to protect the minority from the majority. This is the reason for the electoral college system. The smaller and less populated states are given greater weight in presidential elections. This is how candidates can win the popular vote but lose the election. Not exactly democratic, but necessary to keep the larger population areas from completely dominating elections. Also, despite many peoples complaints, the electoral college will never change because it would take a constituional amendment that will never pass congress or state votes. Many others items also suggest the Constitution as being undemocratic. One basic idea is that the people did not vote for the Constitution. Some other items that are viewed as proof that the Constitution is undemocratic are: the Ratification process, the senate and the way each state is represented, and in Article I, Section 2, a slave counts as 3/5 of a person. These are just some of the ideas that provide evidence as to why the Constitution is thought to be undemocratic. These are just a few other notions to consider and are not the only ideas to consider. It is a document of law for the ruling body to enforce when neededusually to their benefit. A democratic constitution should be for thepeople enforced by an elected governing body for the people.Democratic.The meaning of democracy, isn't it the same as socializim?When did socializm become a bad word?Socializm is for the peoples and their community.It is what we are fighting for right now. We are fighting for ourcommunities in the USA from invasion.
Asked in Democracy

What is pillar of democracy?

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In the case of the United States it is the Constitution, which is the supreme law of the land.
Asked in Democracy

What is democracy?

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Democracy is a regime that is organised by the rule of the people. Is a rule of people by the people Democracy refers to the system of government whereby the subjects are eligible to electing their leaders.
Asked in Countries, States, and Cities, Roman Empire, Ancient Rome, Democracy

When did Rome become a democracy?

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im a loser and Rome was never a Democracy, it was a Republic controlled primarily by the Nobles in the early stage and later by both the plebians (average poorer citizens) and by the Patricians (Roman Nobles). The senate was only for Roman nobles and the concilium plebis was to establish laws by the general populace. The change from Roman Republic to Roman Empire can be traced to 27 B.C. when octavian (Augustus Caesar First Emperor of Rome) "returned" power to the senate after the civil war, but in fact gave the senate little to no power and he was the shadow leader under what was then called the principate.
Asked in Definitions, Democracy

What does democracy mean?

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A democracy is a regime where rule is determined by the people. Usually, the rule of the people involves voting either directly on propositions, or indirectly through representatives. The original Greek word was derived from demos, meaning "the people," and kratein meaning "to rule." So it means '' ruled by the people'' or ''the people rule.'' Essentially, a democracy is a system of government owned and controlled by the majority of those it governs. Decisions on policies and actions by the government are made by the elected representatives of the populace, or by direct plebiscite (propositions decided by a majority vote of the citizens). The modern concept of a democracy is a form of government in which power is held directly or indirectly by citizens under a free electoral system. Abraham Lincoln referred to the US democracy as a government "by the people, of the people, and for the people." This is one of the best and simplest definitions. In a democracy, the people who live under it elect their own leaders by voting. The problem of pure democracies can be illustrated by the old proverb about two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for dinner. It works much better in a republic, where the people vote for other people to represent them to the elected leaders, called 'government'; these people use good sense in making decisions, and can be thrown out of office if they do not.
Asked in Democracy

How much power do citizen have in a democracy?

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In a direct democracy, such as in Ancient Greece, the citizens have all power, and everything is done by majority rule. The problem with this is that the over-excited mass often overrules the minority's rights. In a representative democracy, or a republic, the people's power is balanced by allowing the representative to fight for their constituency's interests while protecting the minorities.
Asked in Democracy

Define direct democracy?

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A direct democracy is a form of democracy (government) in which the population has an immidiate and direct say in the actions of the government as opposed to representation through an elected official (indirect democracy)where the voting poulations chooses the governing bodies course of action by electing officials and , for smaller, local governments, voting at an elections to pass a bill (proposition). An example of an indirect democracy is the United States Senate. An example of a direct democracy is a town hall meeting in New England similar to the town hall meetings in The Simpsons where the population votes directly to propsed actions.

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