ADD-ADHD

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder is a condition that can affect children and adults and characterized by becoming easily bored, constant fidgeting and daydreaming.

Asked in Conditions and Diseases, ADD-ADHD, Epilepsy

Is there a link between ADHD and epilepsy?

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My son was ridiculously hyperactive in his first four years, then petit mal (absence seizures) were exceptionally noticeable-even up to four minutes if left alone, and he could automatically do just about everything- scary concept if ur child is crossing the street alone on his way to school, or playing contact sport or being bullied because of seizures:( he'll keep walking, but not be aware of anything. he was diagnosed as positive with EEG tests etc, and went onto epilim for about four years. his concentration improved , but during the initial phases his medication was too high and he became violently hyperactive, reduced the meds and back to perfect. after three years solid with no seizures we stopped epilim and it hasn't returned since. he has however suffered typical (and very frustrating)adhd symptoms- he plays drums when the hyperactivity gets too much and his legs never stop moving.hes never been diagnosed with add/adhd BUT i am certain that this explains EVERYTHING. in my mind there is a definite link between them. his father has tourettes with adhd so it is highly possible...
Asked in ADD-ADHD

Is ADHD a real disorder?

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Yes but it really, really, really must be medically diagnosed by someone with a medical degree and a specialist - not a pediatrician or a school counselor. Please locate a local support group that is a part of the National Association of ADD Parents (I forgot the name). Go, listen, share, get involved. Some children respond to drug therapy, some do not. It is NOT like the flu that you get and it goes away. It is either here or not, forever. It isn't cured, it is controlled. BEHAVIOR MODIFICATION is very important, not only for the child but the parents must train themselves also. And the teachers. This is the BIGGEST PROBLEM. Parents want a magical herb or pill which will make their child "normal," but it takes everyone involved with an ADD person (yes, if you have it as a child you will have it as a teen and as an adult). ADD people usually need fast moving situations. They get bored easily, are generally smarter than the general population, their brain goes ever so much faster. So they must be kept busy and challenged. Don't restrict an ADD child to a "quiet room" or sit them in the hall, or remove them to some static environment. Keep them moving: sports, chores, playing! (Remember a child's job is "play." It stimulates growth and sensory development and challenges decision making processes). DO YOUR OWN RESEARCH. TRAIN YOURSELF. AND ABOVE ALL: YOU, THE PARENT, HAVE TO BE VERY, VERY ORGANIZED. AND YOU ARE THE MODEL, THE PERSON WHO HAS TO KEEP IT ALL TOGETHER! ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Whether it's real or not, psychiatric "medications" are poisons. See ritalindeath.com ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- It's only a subset of features that are more noticeable in contrast to the illness that is more deeply rooted. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- AD/HD is more highly heritable than manic-depression, which makes it very much a "real" disorder. In my family it is clearly confined to my mother's side. I have ADD, my son has ADHD and four of his five male maternal first cousins have some form of the disorder (3 have ADHD, 1 had ADD, 1 is "normal"). My brother's daughter may have ADD (yet to be assessed). It is a genetic disorder which affects the development of specific sections of the brain which are involved in focusing, attention and inhibition. The areas may differ slightly from one victim to another. The reason why ADD is more common in girls and ADHD in boys has to do with the way in which the brain develops in response to male and female hormones. There really is a tendency for male and female brains to be wired differently, just as there is a tendency for males to grow taller than females. Of course, there is a lot of overlap between the sexes on these, and other, gender-linked characteristics. One person suggested that "psychiatric" drugs were all poisonous and should be avoided. The truth is that all medical drugs are dangerous - or there would be no need to have them available on prescription only or to train doctors and pharmacists for so long. In fact, most substances we eat or drink are also poisonous - when used inappropriately or to excess. Even water is toxic and deaths from its over consumption are reported (incredulously) in the media from time to time. Of course, we will die if we don't have enough, too. And we will not function properly if we do not take the best available medications for our disorders. The risks have always got to be weighed along with the benefits - that is what good pharmaceutical medicine is all about. Denying yourself or your child the best available medicine (tailored to their needs and their particular metabolism) is just as criminal as abusing material designed to be used therapeutically in the correct proportions. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Why is it I only see ADD or ADHD students work well on something that is interesting to them. My nephew was diagnosed with ADHD and he told me recently that he would act up because he was bored out of is mind and now (getting out of rehab) he loved the feeling the Ritalin gave him (20 years ago).. He learned a behavior of acting up to get a pill. Sure the medical community does a good job treating people but the problem is they very rarely treat the problem and almost always treat the symptoms. Go figure. If you were a doctor would want to learn how to cure or how to keep your job safe?! ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- I found that this book addresses this question quite well, better than I could here. I would definitely recommend reading it and trying some of the suggestions before giving children medication. I found them to be very effective. The Myth of the ADD Child:50 Ways to Improve Your Child's Behavior and Attention Span Without Drugs, Labels, or Coercion by Thomas Armstrong It depends on what you mean by disorder. If you mean like if diagnosed with it do they have to be in special ed? then no. a mental disorder? yes. most people with it are rather bright they just have a different way of perceiving things.
Asked in ADD-ADHD, Medication and Drugs, Vicodin, Elements and Compounds

What is clonidine?

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Clonidine is a antihypertensive medication used to treat blood pressure.
Asked in ADD-ADHD, Nutrition

Can ADHD be treated by changing diet?

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Many parents have tried nutritional methods, such as taking sugar out of the child's diet, before they seek medical attention. A small body of research has suggested that some children may benefit from nutritional treatments, but there are no well-established methods that have consistently shown to be helpful to most children with ADD/ADHD. Monitoring a child's diet gets more difficult as a child gets older and more independent, making the research difficult. Also, delaying the use of proven, effective treatments, while trying things with unknown effects may be harmful to children. [The ADD/ADHD information above is based on source material from the National Institute on Mental Health entitled "Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) - Questions and s," published in March 2000.] An appropriate diet, when combined with supplements, such as Omega 3 fatty acids, and a structured lifestyle, with a system of rewards, and punishments, such as removal of privileges, helps a great deal. An increased incidence of abuse of cocaine, crack cocaine, crystal meth, and other amphetamines has been reported among users of Ritalin, and other amphetamine related medications, which may well predispose them to later abuse street drugs, with all the adverse consequence it entails. Take at least 4 Omega 3 fish oil supplements, daily: (certified free of mercury) it is best if consumed with an antioxidant, such as an orange, or its FRESHLY SQUEEZED juice. If vitamin E is added, it should be certified as being 100% from natural sources, or if it is synthetic, avoid it. Eliminate, or minimize sugar use, replacing with xylitol, or stevia which you can get from the health food stores. Avoid artificial colors, flavors, sweeteners, preservatives, and monosodium glutamate. Minimize highly processed grains, and use of alcohol . Suggested books for reference: 1. "The A.D.D. and A.D.H.D. Diet! A Comprehensive Look at Contributing Factors and Natural Treatments for Symptoms of Attention Deficit Disorder and Hyperactivity" by Rachel Bell, 2. "Ritalin Is Not The : A Drug-Free, Practical Program for Children Diagnosed with ADD or ADHD" by David B. Stein. 3. "HOW TO BEAT HYPERACTIVITY WITHOUT DRUGS Reversing ADD and ADHD in 20 days" Michael Sichel & Greta Sichel. 2001. Bookbound Publishing.
Asked in ADD-ADHD, Domain Names, Waste and Recycling, Social Network Websites

How do you know if you have A D D?

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one question, have you ever been doing something and not been able to account for 15 minutes of time? a serious daydream no matter how hard you try. if you take a 15 minute trip into your own mind then you may have it. if you think it is serious, consult your doctor More input from FAQ Farmers: * History of ADD symptoms in childhood, such as distractibility, short attention span, impulsivity or restlessness. I don't work with problems very well at all. I don't talk out my problems when I have them. I have mood swings alot. I don't like being around people. I never liked getting a job.
Asked in ADD-ADHD

What is ADHD?

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Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) refers to a family of related cognitive disorders that interfere with a person's capacity to have normal activity levels (hyperactivity), hold back on impulsive behaviour (impulsivity), and focus on tasks (inattention) in developmentally appropriate ways. ADHD is a neurobiology disorder, meaning the problem affects brain function (thinking, learning and memory) and behaviour. Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder can have difficulties at home, at school, and in relationships with friends and other children their age. ADHD has also been shown to have long-term adverse effects on school performance, career or job success, and social-emotional development. Because children with ADHD are not able to sit still and pay attention in school, they may have disciplinary problems, and they can be viewed as troublemakers by teachers and other students. They experience peer rejection and show a broad range of disruptive behaviours. Their academic and social problems can have far-reaching and long-term effects. These children have higher injury rates. As they grow older, children with untreated ADHD, in combination with conduct disorders, are at risk for abuse, antisocial behaviour, and injuries of all sorts. Up to 70% of children diagnosed with ADHD will continue to have symptoms into adulthood. What is the relationship between Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and other disorders, such as learning disabilities, anxiety disorders, bipolar disorder, or depression? Most children treated for ADHD have other conditions. ADHD can co-occur with learning disabilities (15-25%), language disorders (30-35%), conduct disorder (15-20%), oppositional defiant disorder (up to 40%), mood disorders (15-20%), and anxiety disorders (20-25%). Up to 60% of children with tic disorders also have ADHD. Problems with memory, cognitive processing, sequencing, motor skills, social skills, control of emotional response, and response to discipline are common. Sleep disorders are also more common. [The Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder information above is based on source material from the National Institute on Mental Health entitled "Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) - Questions and Answers," published in March 2000.] To elaborate on the previous answer, since ADHD and ADD have a significant biochemcial component, it is not surprising that those with ADHD find it varies in intensity over time, from day to day, and even during different times of day. The environment also plays a role in how easy it is to concentrate and refrain from fidgeting. Many, if not most people with ADHD and ADD learn to cope with it with the various aspects of the disorder, by compensation or practice. However, some of the ADHD deficits are not cope-able, meaning one needs to learn to live and work them. It will not actually go away, but it can become less of a problem as one learns to compensate for it. The most effective ways to deal with it usually include a combination of medication (for the biochemical part), behavior modification, and coping strategies.
Asked in Mental Health, ADD-ADHD

Can adults have ADHD?

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Up to 70% of children with ADD/ADHD will continue to have symptoms into adulthood. The main symptoms of ADD/ADHD in adults are trouble managing time and struggling with memory and disorganization. ADD/ADHD in adults is often referred to as the "hidden disorder" because its symptoms can often be confused with other problems with relationships, organization, mood disorders, substance abuse, employment or other personal difficulties. Diagnosing and treating ADD/ADHD in adults can help them put their problems into perspective, better understand the reasons for many of their lifelong symptoms, and improve their self-esteem, work performance and skills, educational abilities and social skills. OH, YOU ARE SOOOOOO not alone! Everything you are struggling with is a perfect description of how I have been all my life. It wasn't until recently that I looked into this as being a legitimate problem instead of just a character flaw. I know exactly what you mean about feeling inadequate. I can't stand for people to think of me as a big flake and an airhead, yet my actions and inability to "get it together" seem to prove them right time and time again. It's very frustrating when I KNOW I'm not stupid, but sadly, the whole "walking and chewing gum at the same time" phrase is a realistic challenge for me. Okay, so maybe I could pull that off, but I serously struggle to get my brain to concentrate on one thing -- adding a second is usually not an option! Let your doctor sort it out. I am going through this with my son and I believe with the medication, there is improvement and you will know it. Try medication. I am so relieved, although a little saddened at the same time, to hear other people suffering with the same problems as I do. I was recently diagnosed with ADD and have just started medication. For everyone, that takes some 'tweeking' to find the right combinations, but Wellbutrin has started making me feel calmer and more able to manage with my 'flaws'. I never even thought I had something wrong with me. I knew I was relatively bright, but no rocket scientist. I could always talk myself into high powered jobs, but I couldn't manage the work load when I was there. My career is one of constantly multitasking and needing to be tremendously organised and needing to be able to work well under stress. A nightmare for someone with ADD. I tried coping by throwing more hours at the job but I never got to the end of anything while seeing my peers coping around me. I was nervous about answering the phone, and tended to let everything go into voicemail so I would not get caught short - asked a question I could not answer because I could not 'remember'. I'd read the last page of a book first, reread and reread each page of a book, begging information to sink into my head. I cannot remember numbers, directions or peoples names. It makes you feel dumb and stupid and it has made me embarrassed and lowered my self esteem to an all time low. I thought part of it was post partem depression, but it has been going on most of my life, so that could not be the case. Over the space of a few weeks everything came to a head and I could not cope with anything. I made more and more mistakes and felt more and more stupid as I knew they were silly mistakes I had no business to make. What I thought dit not come out at the end of my pen or in emails. It was a shock to find out it was adult ADD but in a way it was a relief. Then you start looking at those around you and wondering if it is a world ailment, who 'hasn't got ADD', not who has! Thanks for being there and we will all get through this together!
Asked in ADD-ADHD, Strattera, Medication and Drugs, Antidepressants, ADD-ADHD Non-Stimulant Medication

Has anyone tried Welbutrin and Strattera for an ADHD child?

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I was an ADHD child mom tried everything to calm me down the worse it got the more depressed I got. one day I guess it was a cry for help or i am lucky that i didn't know what I was doing i tried to slice my wrist. that got me put in the hospital. after weeks of evaluations they put me on welbutrin and it helped i went from cs and d's to a's and b's. I did get off of it till just recently i experienced some mood swings and such. I was also a single mom for 3 years and divorced and when I met my current husband my brain tried to push him away thus the moods and such the welbutrin came to my rescue again. It has truly been a blessing in my life I dont know where I would be with out it My daughter has been on everything imaginable, she did however take strattera for a short time. She is 13 years old and currently on depekote. They can't make up their minds what to diagnosis her as, but when she was on the strattera she did lose a lot of weight, but she vomited everyday. She didn't have an appetite and she was alot more hyper. So we took her off that. Then she was put on adderall and it made her dizzy. She had taken that several years before when she was about 9 years old. She was also on paxil for about 2 weeks when she was 11 years old which has caused her down fall. She was admitted into a physciatric hospital due to suicidal thoughts and basically going nuts. We have taken her off medications because they weren't doing any good at all. At this time if she misses a dose of her depakote we all just have to pack up and move out. Be very careful what you put your children on. We did find out, about a year later, that the new studies on paxil caused suicidal tendency. I don't know if as she grows older her problems get worse or if putting her on the paxil in the first place caused the chemical imbalance. I still don't think we've found the miracle drug combination yet, never tried her on welbutrin. Maybe that would be the next step. akaleia's story I am responding to the statement the user before me had with her experience of having her daughter on Paxil. I was 19 at the time and this was the first of any kind of mental medication I was put on, mostly for shyness and depression. Anyway, I gained 40 lbs on it, (I'm 28 now, it's still a struggle) and if I went even an hour without my dose of paxil, my face and hands would go numb and I would go into a panic fit, like a tatrum as a toddler. Mind you, I was on 40 mgs, I beleive.. it took a very long time to get off of. I even had to go down to 1/4 of the pill to wean myself off of it, eventually turning to Lexapro with good results. I would suggest a non-stimulant for her add, as well as nutrition, and just getting her involved in outside volunteering. Strattera is a good add/adhd drug. Discuss all of this with your dr of course. . Your post may be old, but maybe it will help others! Good luck, and once you find something that works, don't let someone talk you into something different!
Asked in ADD-ADHD, US Military

Can someone with ADHD join the military?

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Yes, with conditions. The United States Military generally avoids recruiting people that require a daily medication for an illness (such as diabetes, thyroid conditions, and ADHD). It is best if you take a daily medication to discontinue use for a year before you apply to join the army. If you do not require medication and can pass all the requirements elsewhere you can join the US army. However, those who currently take medication are not accepted.
Asked in ADD-ADHD, Doctors

How do you find the right doctor to treat ADHD?

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Opinion My advice would be to find other people with ADD in the area who are being treated, and find out who their doctor is and how well the treatment is working. You should be able to find someone pretty quickly that way. I had great effects from taking my kids to Sensory Integration therapy (an additional certification for Occupational Therapy), which gave them the skills they needed to cope. Also, I did maintain a structured lifestyle with homecooked meals, exercise and a set bedtime. They both have graduated from college and are doing well. There is a robust, valid test given by the therapist for the disorder (they don't label it ADD) and specific therapies are set up to resolve the issue. My kids went from being wired to being calm and confident. Opinion I'm glad you asked how to find the right doctor because the best place to start is with a qualified mental health professional. Just because a GP has the ability to prescribe meds doesn't mean he knows how to assess ADD and administer proper doses. If you must get advice from a GP I would certainly get a second opinion. Stimulants are sometimes used to treat ADD and firm discipline is almost always counterproductive. If a child is put on ADD meds, he should be monitored to see how they are affecting him. That includes asking him how the meds make him feel. You should try an internet search in your area for ADHD specialists. You may find some interesting prospects by reading the reviews. Also, you can contact the school psychologist to ask if they could provide a list. You should also ask your child's pediatrician for a list of referrals. We are fortunate at this point in time to be able to check out medical professionals online. Opinion CHADD (Children and Adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder- chadd.org) is a national support group that has chapters in most all metropolitan areas. You should seek out your local chapter, attend a meeting and ask for advice from the membership. They will know which doctors and other professionals to avoid and which ones who have a history of meaningful help.
Asked in Mental Health, ADD-ADHD, Amish

How do the Amish view people with ADHD?

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They would view them as a regular person loved by God.
Asked in ADD-ADHD, Sleep Disorders

Is falling asleep easily a sign of ADHD?

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no its not really easy to fall asleep with ADHD in fact I have it and for me it is hard to fall asleep i take melatonin and it helps me fall asleep and when you yell alot you have adhd or add .i pinch myself when i get angry if you have it try to find somthing that will make you able to be mad at yourself!
Asked in ADD-ADHD

How do you tell ADHD-induced from normal behavior?

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* Behaviors can be judged as normal or "problem" ADD by evaluating them in relation to the person's age and developmental maturity. For example, the same behaviors that are acceptable in a 5-year old may be problematic for a 10-year old. * Problem behaviors are also long lasting, tend to occur more often and create more problems as time goes on. Children with ADD/ADHD will have more problems than other children their age experience in the same settings. * It's not worth it to try anyway, since negative labels aren't helpful, especially for children. Instead, focus on correcting certain behaviors.
Asked in Health, Women's Health, ADD-ADHD

Is ADHD different in women?

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I was diagnosed about 5 years ago, and could see the ADHD all down the road behind me. As a female, the ADHD tends to manifest in a quieter way, withdrawing socially, daydreaming, etc, which has caused some people to believe it was a "little boy" disorder....a large percentage of females do not show hyperactive symptoms, but that could just be conditioning more than anything....Driven to Distraction is a good book on ADHD, with some parts referring to the different symptoms between genders. I grew up as a girl with A.D.D. and was very hyperactive - more so than any boys in my class. As I grew older (high school) it became more related to chronic daydreaming, extreme "spaciness", detachment from surroundings.
Asked in ADD-ADHD, Cold and Flu, Concerta

Are repetitive movements a symptom of ADHD?

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No; repetitive movements are more likely to be a symptom of autism. Twitching or fidgeting are symptoms of ADHD that involve movement.
Asked in ADD-ADHD, Medication and Drugs

After stopping meds are you better or worse?

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At first he might be worse, but he'll be better off in the long run. ADD pills can cause heart problems, growth problems, psychosis, even hyperactivity, and your child's very life could be in danger. Tourette's and ocd have also been known to develop. However, it is dangerous to take him off all at once. Give him less and less, and let him quit when he's on a pretty small amount. I went off meds for about a year due to insurance problems, and I'm definitely worse. I am 25 years old, a college graduate, and have not been able to hold down a job because all my ADD symptoms came flooding back. I was impatient, had little impulse control, no organization, and no concentration and was fired from two jobs because of those problems. That contributed to a lot of the depression I feel. Now that I am still out of work, I can't go back on the meds, but I really wish I had never gotten off them. I graduated from an extremely selective college and have an IQ over 160 but no ability to concentrate and no impulse control, and that's screwed me over because doing a good job at anything requires concentration and impulse control. The long term side effects, if there are any, are COMPLETELY worth it, for your quality of life and self-esteem will be so much higher when you are treated. Hey there, Sorry to be answering this question twice, but I just wanted to let you know that I know how it is to have trouble concentrating, and not having any medications work. In my case, at least, absolutely none of my medications worked, and they gave me panic attacks to the point where I had to stop taking them. I also know what it's like to be highly intelligent and not be able to focus or concentrate for a longevital duration. I was tested at age 15 with a verbal IQ of 146 and a mathematical IQ of 137 (substantially lower, as I really don't do well on standardized math tests. The odd thing is that I have trouble with geometric formulae and advanced algebra, but yet I understand calculus simply by looking at it - I recognise patterns in calculus such that I can inductively extrapolate the answer without even having to work the problem. I just do it through visualization -- it's almost a savant skill (although I'm not autistic, I just think I'm a really good pattern-recognizer, and I have excellent logical and inductive reasoning skills. Which is weird. I really don't have any problems concentrating in general off of my medications, but I just cannot sustain my concentration for a duration of more than about 30 minutes. I was just wondering if there are any meds out there that don't exacerbate one's anxiety levels and still work efficaciously to help one concentrate. Any insights from anyone would be appreciated. But just know that you are not alone in this - and that you can always employ techniques such as elaborative rehearsal, mindfulness strategies, and certain grouping techniques in order to concentrate. For example, I colour-code everything. Also, I find that active visualization of what I am studying really helps input it into my long-term memory. I also use pneumonic devices a lot, especially with acronymic word association. And mental and physical exercise helps wonders on the brain...So don't give up...there are always strategies you can implement to get your attention going. Good luck, and let me know if you need anything. I'm here for ya ~ Lauren If the medication is helping your child in school or with his/her hyperactivity then i suggest you do not stop the medication, your child will be worse because all of his/her hyperactivity will come back along with his/her problems in school. I am 25 and have been diagnosed with ADHD, bipolar disorder, and was misdiagnosed with high-functioning autism when I was 17 (I had just been going through a rough time). My diagnosis of bipolar is also highly in question, as I tend to have more of a unipolar mania than depression. However, a lot of my symptoms of compulsive spending and drinking have diminished considerably since adolescence. I literally have none of the symptoms of compulsive behaviour now, but I still have manic periods where I cannot sleep and I have creative outbursts of energy where I write and compose music endlessly, almost non-stop. The ideas come into my mind, and I'm going full-throttle. I move at a kind of 'artificial pace', and my mind is way too fast for most people, including myself, to keep up with. The ADD stimulants I was taking, including Focalin and Vyvanse slowed me down considerably, but they made me feel really out of it. I actually thought I was having a nervous breakdown on one of them. I was put on Vyvanse, and that stuff literally 'froze' my nervous system up, to the point where it literally took me three hours to get out of bed. I just walked around like a zombie on those things...plus they gave me horrible anxiety. I realised that my sensitivity to stimulants made it almost impossible to tolerate them, and getting off of these meds has diminished my anxiety considerably. But I still get drifty from time to time....I was wondering if there are any ADD medications out there for people with anxiety, and who are also sensitive to stimulants, other than adderal, vyvanse, and focalin (i hear those all increase people's anxiety levels). I've also tried Strattera, and that did nothing for me. It just made me really sleepy.... I was wondering if Wellbutrin increases one's focus while not producing any anxiety. Please feel free to let me know. Thank you so much for your time and consideration to this matter. Your imput is greatly appreciated. Sincerely, Lauren
Asked in ADD-ADHD

Where can you get help for adult ADHD in the UK?

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Have you tried the Learning Assessment & Neurocare Centre in Horsham, West Sussex? (01403 240004) No I have not heard of it I am diagnosed by the Maudsley and not getting the help I ought to have A good place to start would be Adults with Attention Deficit Diosrder UK. See link below.
Asked in ADD-ADHD

Where can one find help and treatment for ADHD in the Houston TX area?

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Here's a link, http://www.iser.com/add-assess-TX.html I am unfamiliar with Houston's ADHD resources, but CHADD (a nonprofit ADD network should be able to help, here is a link to their main site, they have a clearinghouse of links and other info. Good luck! http://www.chadd.org/ My kids had problems with attention, sequencing, calming down and so on--never diagnosed with ADD. However, I found that Houston has a great center for Sensory Integration, which diagnoses and gives them skills to overcome the issues. The best, and the one I used, was Occupational Therapy Center, Inc. Sensory Integration is an additional certification, and the test they give is valid and robust. They did an excellent job with both my boys and both have graduated from college and are working. Not sure it would have happened otherwise. Look up Sensory Integration: http://www.sensoryint.com/
Asked in ADD-ADHD

Are ADHD tests intentionally deceptive?

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I'm sure deception was never the doctor's intention. It may very well have been an IQ test you were given, but I suspect any kind of written test would have served. The results of the test were not at issue. IQ doesn't necessarily have anything to do with ADD. Has it occured to you at all to consider what some of the symptoms or indicators of ADD are? Your doctor was probably observing your body language, as well as your ability (or inability) to concentrate, among other things. Most people would be very self-conscious if they were told up front that they were being observed and therefore would probably act differently, aware that any move or gesture they made was being analyzed. And the results could have been compromised, possibly even causing a misdiagnosis.
Asked in ADD-ADHD, Psychological Disorders

Does ADHD exist in women?

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Many girls and women with ADD/ADHD are often undiagnosed because their symptoms look different from those in boys or men. Many girls or women may not appear hyperactive. Girls are usually less rebellious, less defiant and generally considered less difficult than boys. Boys who are hyperactive and disorganized are easier to spot and more likely to be referred for an evaluation. There are several personality types of girls in which ADHD could be a factor. For example, there are girls who are shy and withdrawn, but disorganized. There are girls who are "tomboys," who are drawn to risky activities. They may be cooperative at school and work hard to please parents and teachers, but are often disorganized and messy. There are "daydreamers" or girls who seem to listen to teachers in class, but be in another world. They may find their minds wandering, are forgetful and disorganized. They become very anxious, depressed, worried and overwhelmed when schoolwork is due. They often are thought to be less bright than they actually are. "Chatty" girls also have high activity levels, and are very talkative and emotional, but can be forgetful and disorganized. Highly intelligent girls, with above average IQs, who have increasing problems with concentration and organization as their school life becomes more demanding also may have ADHD. Women with ADHD who complain of feeling overwhelmed and disorganized tend to be diagnosed more often with depression. These women often feel a powerful sense of shame and inadequacy. They oftentimes need to spend all of their waking energy just fighting their natural tendency to be disorganized. Sometimes, ADHD does not become a problem until a woman has a baby or a second baby, when she is expected to be highly organized, accomplishing multiple roles under a lot of strain as both a caregiver and, in many cases, a career woman. In addition to the above, lots of popular media in our culture, like women's magazines often have articles about how women are supposed to be multi-taskers, and how all women have trouble keeping up with kids, home, work, etc. You see it in movies and TV shows, too. This can prolong denial, and make it harder for women to get diagnosed.
Asked in ADD-ADHD

What are some misdiagnoses of ADHD?

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A harmful misdiagnosis of ADD/ADHD is diagnosing children with ADD/HD who actually don't have the disorder at all. Some children are mistaken to have ADD/HD when in fact they are just being kids. A misdiagnosis of ADD/HD could mean that a child is put on unneeded meds which in turn could be dangerous as is taking any unneeded med. Some symptoms of ADD/HD to look for in your child is easily distracted by unimportant sights or sounds, inabbility to sit still or for an older child the inability to plan ahead or to be organized and also not being fully aware of whats going on around them because they seem to be in "their own little world". for more information go to http://www.nativeremedies.com/focus_for_adhd.shtml?cl=ppc&source=GOOG&kw=adhd or see your child's pediatrician or your family doctor Answer My nephew was diagnosed with ADD. As it turns out he is an incredibly gifted child. His outbursted of frustration were deamed inappropriate, lacking in self control and disruptive behaviour and his zoning out was all contributed to being bored out of his mind with school work and being uncomfortable in an unstimulating and unchallenged atmosphere. He now has the appropriate resources and is quite the little scholar. In the same token yes all those behaviour were inappropriate and now under wraps. Hooray... Answer I'm doing a research paper on the misdiagnosis of ADD/ADHD and after some research I found out that bedwetting is often misdiagnosed with the disorder. If your child wets their bed a lot and they have been diagnosed with ADD you may want to get that checked out. Sometimes after several treatments of bedwetting, the symptoms like the ones of ADD disappear. If the symptoms do not disappear after several treatments, then your child may actually have the disorder. Check out this link for more info... www.drybed.com/adhd.htm I was actually misdiagnosed with ADD a few years ago when I was 16. I also had clinical depression, and even attempted suicide. Now that I've been seeing a new doctor, he ran some tests, lab work, and did a full evaluation (which my old one never did) and come to find out I actually have Bipolar disorder. Bipolar actually has the same symptoms as ADD and depression and medications for ADD and Depression can make this worse. Antidepressants can induce episodes of mania, and as ADD medications can increase risk of suicidal thoughts, can be VERY dangerous. I recently read that up to 25% of people with Bipolar will die of suicide. So be very careful and question the diagnosis of your doctors!!! ANSWER: I was misdiagnosed with dyslexia, and then this summer I was diagnosed with ADD. this is because my maturity, and my answers changed, I was tested when I was in 3rd grade. People should probably get tested when they are around 11 or older, when they understand things a little clearer, and so the answers are more accurate.
Asked in ADD-ADHD, Human Behavior, Symptoms

Is rocking back and forth while talking when sitting or standing a symptom of ADHD or something else?

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If the behavior concerns you it should be evaluated by a medical professional. There could be several underlying causes.
Asked in ADD-ADHD, Genetics

What are other causes for ADHD besides genetics?

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There are many theorized causes including food intolerances, family stresses, the disorder is often coupled with other coexisting conditions such as FAS. It was previously believed that ADD was due to head traumas and a small number is still affecte dthis way. There is no tried and tested way to disclose the cause in any one individual