WikiLeaks

WikiLeaks is a non-profit whistleblowing website that publishes leaks of government documents from anonymous sources. Although it launched as an editable wiki, it no longer accepts edits or comments. Since 2007, WikiLeaks has published documents about the Afghanistan and Iraq wars, as well as highly sensitive material from the U.S. State Department. Julian Assange, an Australian journalist and activist is the editor-in-chief and spokesperson for WikiLeaks.

Asked in WikiLeaks

When did WikiLeaks release their first document?

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The website published it's first document in December 2006.
Asked in Law & Legal Issues, Jail Incarceration, WikiLeaks

Is Assange still in jail?

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No, Julian Assange (as of 3/9/2011) is not in jail. He was released on strict conditional bail by a London court but is still under house arrest as he is appealing the decision regarding his extradition to Sweden to face rape allegations.
Asked in US National Security, WikiLeaks

Did WikiLeaks hurt the US?

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Yes, they released top-secret government information Another view... I disagree, and for rather a lot of reasons. In order to explain my answer (and to rebut the above answer), I need to clarify a few points on how national security works. After WW-II, the international security community had developed a staggering number of security classifications in what was a hierarchical attempt to sequester certain information. Unfortunately, information doesn't often fit into a rigid, pyramidal, hierarchical structure. There is no "man at the top" who can know everything, as even then, everything was beyond the scope of one person. In an effort to address this, most of the classifications were removed, with only three remaining in the classified world: Classified, Secret and Top Secret. And of course not everything fit into these three. Some information was so important that it needed to be shared only with those that needed to know. And so Compartmentalized information was created. In this case, information that was sensitive was classified within a project or compartment name. So, for instance, your Top Secret clearance wouldn't get you anywhere near the "Ultra" information that had to do with Japanese encryption during WW-II. This sort of compartmentalization exists to this day. Even with this simplification, however, problems existed. Think of the poor security officer tasked with developing classification. If he declassified something, there was a chance he'd get in a lot of trouble, if the datum turned out to be really sensitive. And if he declassified correctly, well… nothing. No awards for that. So quite naturally, a lot of information became or remained classified at higher levels than it needed (if indeed it needed to be classified at all). The result of this was that, entering into the 21st century, the US had a dazzling amount of stuff retained under security classification, that really didn't need to be classified at all. This caused a huge problem in terms of intelligence analysis and collaboration, highlighted by some of the investigations after 9/11, where data wasn't always passed for fear of compromising security. Both the Bush and Obama administrations have made it a priority to declassify a huge amount of information held under legal classification. It's a great idea, has bipartisan support and no real opponents. The problem, of course, remains that, even with a presidential directive or edict in place, the job of declassification is both extremely difficult, politically dangerous and utterly unrewarding. The result is predictable: not nearly as much has been done as was mandated. Enter WikiLeaks. In America and most democratic/republican governments, there is a requirement for openness in all matters of government. Naturally, this is offset by the requirements of national security, and everyone agrees with both these principles. The government needs accountability to the people, the people want it, and most good government does too. This doesn't mean every door is open, but most should be. Over its existence, WikiLeaks has been presented with a wide array of information, often acquired from whistleblowers, declassification, news sources, etc. WL has shown a lot of care in what actually gets released, and how. The more controversial items in the last large release had been offered beforehand to the US Department of State (DOS), for them to vet what was potentially really critical and what wasn't. WL has, at government request, redacted documents. And they do maintain the 1st Amendment shield of the free press. To date (2012 Feb), I cannot find a case where WL released data with a classification higher than Secret; no Top Secret data appeared in my search. Nothing in the areas of WMD's, encryption, satellite intel, COOP/COG, or C4I where released that I could see, and this is a good representative slice of what modern governments consider to be the holiest of holies. We do seem some opinions expressed by the DOS about foreign leaders that are somewhat derogatory and not what I'd like said about me, but then Americans are famous for being open about their political opinions. We see obsolete SpecOps "manuals", and budgetary talk about the Iraq war and Afghan action. We don't see the wing design of the B2 bomber (although Testor's Model Company, makers of plastic models of planes and ships, apparently has a pretty good handle on that). In summary, while I haven't reviewed every jot and tittle released by WL, I haven't seen anything that would endanger the US national security at all. I have on the other hand seen the upholding of a great free tradition: government accountability to the people. For these reasons, I would suggest that the WL leaks have helped the US far more than hurting us. Yes and no. The release of 'classified' information damages the security of the United States. The problem with people is that they don't realize this while they are cheering on Wikileaks. The damage can be as simple as a growing distrust between countries, which is a threat to US security as well as every western nation. The release of 'non-classified' information could beneficial to the political processes of democracy.
Asked in WikiLeaks

Why are US embassy communications called cables?

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It is a formal term for diplomatic messages between embassies and foreign nations. They are sent over a secure government channel. The term comes from a time when messages were sent via submarine communication cables. WikiLeaks published hundreds of US embassy cables on November 28, 2010.
Asked in WikiLeaks

Is wikileaks getting sued?

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Yes, but not because they released top-secret government information. The president got charged with a crime.
Asked in Celebrity Births Deaths and Ages, WikiLeaks

What is Julian Assange's birthday?

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Julian Assange was born on July 3, 1971.
Asked in Name Origins, Wikipedia, WikiLeaks

Why is Wikipedia named wiki pedia anyway?

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That is because wiki- comes from the word wikiwiki in Hawaiian language, which means quickly and -pedia comes from the word encyclopedia which means a reference work of knowledge and information. So if you combine them together, Wikipedia means a quick reference of knowledge and information.
Asked in WikiLeaks

What is WikiLeaks?

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WikiLeaks is a non-profit whistleblowing website that publishes leaks of government documents from anonymous sources. Although it launched as an editable wiki, it no longer accepts edits or comments. Since 2007, WikiLeaks has published documents about the Afghanistan and Iraq wars, as well as highly sensitive material from the U.S. State Department. Julian Assange, an Australian journalist and activist is the editor-in-chief and spokesperson for WikiLeaks. See related links to visit WikiLeaks.
Asked in Celebrities, Celebrity Relationships, WikiLeaks

What is Julian Assange's mother's name?

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Julian Assange's mother's name is Christine.
Asked in Celebrity Births Deaths and Ages, WikiLeaks

How old is Julian Assange - the founder of WikiLeaks?

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Julian Assange the founder of wikileaks is an Australian and is 39 years old.
Asked in Questions about WikiAnswers and Answers.com, WikiLeaks

Is WikiAnswers affiliated with WikiLeaks?

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No, there is absolutely no connection between the sites.
Asked in WikiLeaks

Why would the Ecuadorean government cut off Julian Assange's internet?

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The U.S Establishment and vested interests are dinosaurs. They still live in a pre-social media era where they think we all believe what CNN and the BBC say. Fortunately for us, or at least those of us who still have the ability not to be brain-washed, we have social media. The age of the dinosaurs of the Establishment is coming to and end. The World is beginning to realize how much of a ruin of the World the dinosaurs have created. I include Obama in that group. Trump surprisingly is not a dinosaur - he wants to take them on. Equador did as it was told by Washington because the U.S is Ecuador's major trading partner. This is taken from the USA Gov website. ....Aside from the fossil fuel trade, the United States is Ecuador's principal trading partner. Major U.S. exports to Ecuador include petroleum products, machinery, computers and electronic equipment, chemicals and fertilizers, transportation equipment, and cereals and grains. Ecuador benefits from duty-free entry into the United States for many of its products under the Generalized System of Preferences. U.S. imports from Ecuador include crude oil, shrimp and prawns, bananas and plantains, cocoa, and cut flowers (roses). The two countries have a bilateral investment treaty in force since 1997. U.S. direct investment in Ecuador is led by the manufacturing and wholesale/retail sectors.
Asked in WikiLeaks

What is your opinion of WikiLeaks?

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It is insensitive and stupid to post such things. Wikileaks is legal, but unnecessary and dangerous to many people worldwide. While exposing any bad things the government does is a good thing and part of the basis for the First Amendment, computer hacking and trying to overthrow democratic governments are not good things to do.
Asked in WikiLeaks

When was WikiLeaks created?

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Launched in 2006 and run by The Sunshine Press.
Asked in Business & Finance, Politics and Government, Kenya, WikiLeaks

Where can you read cables from Wikileaks about Kenya?

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Read cables from "cablegate" on Kenya. 32 results came out from search within the 1904 released cables from dazzlepod.com/cable; see related link.
Asked in Internet, Web Hosting, WikiLeaks

Why does www wikileaks org not work?

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sir, so-many individual social organisation serve the people directly but at the time it is faces many problems and collapsed but Wilek's org was still stable by serve people indirectly and warns the blackmoney people and open unexpected time , we have think that its decision and plans very strong and give wishes to better serve people same procedecure-Gopalkrishna, Hyderabad.
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Who is the founder of WikiLeaks?

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Julian Assange is the founder of Wikileaks
Asked in WikiLeaks

Who is Julian Assange?

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Julian Assange is an Australian journalist and activist as well as the editor-in-chief of controversial website, WikiLeaks, which publishes leaked government documents.
Asked in US Foreign Policy, WikiLeaks

What is an embassy cable?

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Embassy cables are a formal term for (almost always confidential) diplomatic messages sent from an embassy to the foreign ministry (or department) of the embassy's parent nation. Thus, an "embassy cable" from the US Embassy in Germany would be sent to the US Department of State. Embassy cables typically include diplomatically sensitive information, including frank assessments of political or economic situations in the embassy's host country, details on important political figures, military info, and possibly even espionage results. They are considered sacrosant, and are not to be intercepted or monitored (they are the communications equivalent of the diplomatic pouch). Of course, most nations nonetheless monitor these from other countries, but almost always refrain from making the contents known publically. The term comes from a time when messages were sent via submarine communication cables.