Accents and Dialects

Questions and answers related to different accents and dialects of the English language.

Asked in Scotland, Accents and Dialects

What does the Scottish word lucky tatties mean?

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The lucky tattie is a traditional sweet made in Scotland. It is flavoured with cassia, and steamed and covered with cinnamon powder.
Asked in Accents and Dialects, Grammar, The Difference Between

What is different between vowels and consonants?

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Consonants are pronounced by obstructing the airflow through the vocal tract, vowels are pronounced by passing air through different shapes of the mouth. Example: pronounce the letter T. You find that you must flick your tongue on your teeth, or obstructing the airflow through the vocal tract. Try other consonants too, like P is pronounce by pushing the lips together then apart. now pronounce all the vowels, you'll find you don't really use your lips tongue or teeth, just shaping your mouth differently and pushing air out.
Asked in Politics and Government, Word and Phrase Origins, Ireland, Accents and Dialects

What is the meaning of 'Faith and begorrah'?

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'Faith and begorrah' means "sure and by God". This is in the dialect of English called Hiberno-English, not in Irish Gaelic, although there are several features of this dialect owing to the Gaelic.
Asked in Poetry, Accents and Dialects, Poetic Forms

Can anyone give me an example of dialect in poetry?

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Try these: Gwendolyn Brooks "We Real Cool" We Real Cool Buy the CDby Gwendolyn Brooks THE POOL PLAYERS. SEVEN AT THE GOLDEN SHOVEL. We real cool. We Left school. We Lurk late. We Strike straight. We Sing sin. We Thin gin. We Jazz June. We Die soon. Here's a poem by an Appalachian poet I saw online: The Interview © 2008 by Becky Mushko Sure, I'll talk to a fine looking young feller like you. Don't get much company nowadays. Got plenty of time, nothing to do but set here. Teacher sent you, did she? "Get out and talk to some old codger," I reckon she said. Well, you found one. Pull yourself up a chair. Little closer-I ain't gonna bite. Ain't got enough teeth left for serious biting nohow. Now whatcha wanna know? What did I do? Farmed two hundred acres like my daddy and his before him. Tobacco, corn, and wheat-them was the money crops. How? Me and a mule struggling against a hard ground. Many a time, I'uz tempted to fling down the reins, leave the mule standing in the middle of a furrow, and just up and leave. Where would I go? Town, I reckon. Work in a factory or a mill. Make reg'lar money. Be somebody. But I never did go. What stopped me? That farm held me tighter'n a spider holds a fly. Sucked the juices right outta me. Left me the old dry husk you're looking at, tangled so tight in its web I'd never get loose. Then, too, I couldn't work walled in. I'd got used to the sky, y'see, everything growing green around me. Besides, who'd look after the place? I can't stand to see a good farm overrun with pokeweed and cat-briers. Folks held me, too. Family ties grip tight, that's sure. By the time I buried Mama and Daddy, I had me a wife and a crop a' kids. Time was, I couldn't go nowhere without one a' them chaps hanging onto my pants' leg tighter'n a tick on a dog. Then they growed up, scattered like seeds in the wind. Not a one took root. They come back, visit, brag how good they got it in town. Did I ever go modern? Well, yeah-got a tractor, y'know. Then more and more machines. Debts piled up high as Mama's pancakes on Sunday breakfast. Did I make a good living? Heck, no! But I reckon I made me a right good life. Anythin' else you wanna know?
Asked in Accents and Dialects

What are the advantages of having a strong accent?

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Having a strong accent can have advantages if spoken intelligently. General perception is when one speaks with an accent but spoken grammatically correct and spoken with precise descriptive words this accent offers some authority to what is being said. A strong accent, but well spoken, exudes an air of a high capacity mind.
Asked in Accents and Dialects

Why did Americans lose their English accents?

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Actually Ive heard that American's present accent, were the English accents during the colonial times. The American speech resembles the West Country dialect of English. Also, there is more ''slang'' now a days. Americans did not lose their English accents - they never had 'em. The so-called English, or BBC accent, is an upper-class 18th century affectation, in a deliberate, if totally unsuccessful, imitation of French. Americans never adopted it.
Asked in Accents and Dialects

What is a way that people talk called?

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If it is a distinctive pronunciation, it would be called an accent. If it is a distinctive vocabulary and grammar, is would be called a dialect.
Asked in Accents and Dialects

What is the importance of dialect?

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Dialect is important because it helps define different regions or identify them.
Asked in Accents and Dialects

Why is this fake British accent so addicting?

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Because it's fun to do. And convincing if you do it right.
Asked in Languages and Cultures, Northern Ireland, Accents and Dialects

Why do Northern Irish speak with a Scottish accent?

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Answer - No they do not speak with a scottish accent, yes us Scottish & Irish have similar words but they speak with a different accent to those in the south, just like thos in Edinburgh have a different accent to us in Glasgow, or those in London have a different Accent to those in Yorkshire. Northen Ireland is near to Scotland so they accent will be similar, just think about those from Newcastle sound a mixture of Scottish & English, that's because Newcastle is near Scotland. iv lived in belfast for 3 yrs an have a belfast accent,im scottish though,it is so easy to pick up Irish accent,any Irish accent* Scottish Accents in Northern Ireland Because the English encouraged Scots to settle there, hence the term "Scotch-Irish". It is NOT "Scotch-Irish", the correct term is "Ulster-Scots". And they were not "encouraged" per say, but rather forced from their land, it was actually the Protestant English that were encouraged to settle here. Secondly, as you may have noticed.... we don't speak with a Scottish accent! While many Scots did settle in the north of Ireland (and there are similarities between the two as compared with the Irish of the free state/Republic) Ulster men and women speak very differently than the Scots. Please don't compare Sean Connery with a bad version of the North such as Brad Pitt's in "A Devil's Own"! i am from northern Ireland there for my accent is northern Irish and people in the south have a southern accent, either way everyone in the whole of Ireland north and south have an Irish accent! the only people who speak with a scottish accent r the scottish! Depends on what you mean by 'Northern-Irish'. I am originally from Belfast but often I have difficulty in distinguishing a Donegal accent from my own (Donegal is the northernmost county in the Republic of Ireland). Defining the 'Northern-Irish' as the whole northern part of the island, at least in terms of accent, is probably more accurate than confining it to the six counties of Northern Ireland. Having said that, as someone who has lived away from Ireland for over a decade, I have noticed that in several counties south of the 9 counties of Ulster, such as Louth, one can hear northern vowel sounds (.e.g. "eight" prounced 'ee-ut', or "you" prounced 'yoo', or "now" prounced 'now-eeh'. Such a phenomena is not unique to Ireland. People in the Danish island of Bornholm speak Danish in a Swedish accent, and Swedes who live in the southern part of Sweden 'Skona', speak Swedish in a Danish accent. Northen Irish people speak with a Nothern Irish accent. I can appreciate that for outsiders they may sound similar but if your from N.I or Scotland, you will realise that they are distinctely different. Within in Northern Ireland there are a variety of discernable accents. Some Northern Ireland people living in North Antrim and East Down have broad accents which are more similar to the Scots than to those from Derry and Armagh. Northern Irish accents and those of some of the West of Scotland have similarities in vowels and in intonation - the way the accent stresses important words and syllables. There are differences between the accents but to an untrained or a non-local ear it can be really hard to distinguish between them. Actors doing a West of Scotland accent or a Northern Irish one can easily slip from one to the other, sometimes within 2 sentences! It should also be noted that there is not one generic Northern Irish or Scottish accent. There can be a huge variety with subtle differences from one village to the next. I am Southern but having heard Scottish accents and Northern accents I can distinguish between them. The Northern accent (also found in Co.Donegal and Co.Monaghan in the Republic of Ireland) is more drawling, and slower. The Scottish accent is faster and not as drawling. I can say that the Northern Irish do not speak with a Scottish Accent. However there are many different dialects and versions of the accent through the 9 counties. I am from a town called Larne which is only 25 miles away from Scotland, therefore I speak with a very "broad" northern Irish accent, and have been told many times that I am scottish. I suggest checking out two radio stations: BBC Ulster and BBC Scotland (www.bbc.co.UK) to hear the difference! They don't. You just can't tell the difference. Accents all over the world change about every 30-40 miles or so. My wife and I were in Chicago a couple of years ago talking to someone from San Francisco and we couldn't tell the difference between Chicago or Frisco accents but I'm sure there is. However, I do know a New York accent when I hear one - 'Hey goil, go to woik'. I'm from the east of Scotland, and my accent is very different from that, spoken in the west of Scotland. I always thought the west of Scotland spoke with a similar accent to the northern Irish due to the large influx of Irish workers that have settled there ? It all depends on how you look at it,I suppose? Lets just put it to bed lads... People from Northern Ireland speak prodominatly with a Northern Irish accent. This may sound closer to a Scottish accent than a full blown Irish accent does. It is not a Scottish accent. I could tell the difference after two words! In the same way I could tell the difference between a Dublin/Cork/Limerick accent or a Glasgow/Edinburgh/Highland accent. Maybe I have the advantage of a Scotsman living in Ireland. But all these accents are different!!!! They Dont have a scottish accent.......simple as Northern Irish people do NOT have a Scottish accent. Or vice-versa. People from Northern Ireland have a Northern Ireland accent. People from Scotland have a Scottish accent. However a Glasgow-Scottish accent is different from an Edinburgh, Aberdeen, Inverness or Dundee accent. Just as New York is different from Chicago, New Orleons or San Francisco. There is no such thing as an American accent.
Asked in Accents and Dialects

How can you learn an American accent?

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If you want to learn an accent then you must listen to it a lot. Learn how they say their vowels, consanents, mouth formation, stress syllables, and other forms of speech. Try to imitate that, along with adjusting the speed r pitch at which you talk to assume a more "American" tone if at all possible. Learn some common terms or slang that fit in with American culture. If you surround yourself with others who talk with an American accent, soon you will begin to pick it up through constantly hearing it and learning new words or phrases. Listen to a lot of American English and practice using using it. That's the only way I know to get any accent: listen and practice. And make sure when you practice that you really pronounce your "R"s. Watch American TV Watch American films Listen to American radio Listen to American speaking on sites like Youtube Get a CD or DVD or something that helps you improve your American accent Go to America Have conversations with American people Practise speaking with an American accent a lot, at least once a day There is no such thing as a standard American accent if you're on the East Coast, but truly, move to the US and try to sound like the people are you. Failing that, watch movies made in the US and try to imitate the accents. To sound--to an American--as though you have little to no accent, try for something in the Midwestern states. One technique which has worked well for some people is to hire a speech coach (ask people who work in drama, radio, television, or cinema for recommendations), a professional therapist for speech and diction (through medical or educational contacts), or an American student who speaks English as a first language. If all else fails, you're a glutton for punishment, or you just like linguistics, learn to read IPA and check out "Accents of English" by J. C. Wells. It will tell you in excruciating detail exactly how to get each and every phoneme of every word you say to sound like any accent of American English that you want. Also, be specific. There are different versions of the accent. Americans from Texas might speak differently than Americans from New York. It depends on the region. i really dont know . i have financial problem .b'cause i have just joined on company. and salary is no that much.but my work is related to speaking with US clients.so i cant even do any course to improve accent from any institute, plz if you any information , kindly email me at sachbal123@gmail.com.
Asked in Accents and Dialects

What is The difference between dialect and register?

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A dialect is a variety of language used by different speech communities. A register is a variety of language associated with people's occupation. Register is to do with variation in language use connected with topic matter. "One's dialect shows who (or what) he/she is, while one's register shows what he/she is doing"
Asked in Accents and Dialects, Singing

Why don't people have an accent when they sing?

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Some people do have an accent while they sing, for example "Camille" ( a french singer) does have a slight accent when she sings in English. As a whole however, the act of singing is essentially talking and stretching out the vowel sounds. In most languages, vowel sounds are universal; so when they are stretched and modified with pitch, they often lack culturally induced inflections. Singing also relies heavily on consonant sounds, leaving less room for dips in tone or clipping of syllables giving music a more universal sound) Other songs commonly sung with accents include "Loch Lomen" - A Scottish folk song "Electricity" - Billy Elliot the Musical "Donkey Riding" - A Newfie Folk Song
Asked in Accents and Dialects, Definitions

Is doable English or American?

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This execrable word is a recent American fabrication, of no use whatsoever given there are perfectly proper English words available such as achievable, and as such is a "word" which should be avoided at all cost.
Asked in English Language, Accents and Dialects

Does English people speaks American English?

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People who are American speak American English and people who are British speak British English.
Asked in Accents and Dialects, The Difference Between, Similarities Between

What is the difference between the American and British accents?

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Originally, both the British and Americans spoke with a rhotic accent. Rhotic essentially means an accent where the letter 'r' is pronounced strongly after a vowel. Rhotic accents are strong in both the US and Scotland, but seem to have disappeared from British English and its derivatives, such as Australian and New Zealand English. The dominant American accent (the typical accent of the mid-western US) is rhotic, and British English is, as a rule, non-rhotic. Typically, US speakers pronounce every "r", wherever they appear in a word. Most British speakers (and you will note that there are some British Isle accents that are strongly rhotic, like US) do not pronounce every "r". Americans emphasise the "r" at the end of words such as "teacher" or "neighbour", but in many non-rhotic British accents it is more of a "schwa" (an unstressed, neutral, toneless vowel sound) so it comes out as "teacha" (unstressed) or "neighba". This main difference also varies across the country of origin. For example, the US has a clear distinction in the accents between inhabitants of the north and south, not to mention less clearly defined differences across the states. Similarly, British people have a different accent according to their locality. The "cockney" accent is vastly different to the middle and upper class accents. Another common difference appears to be that Americans pronounce words such as 'herbal' without the 'h'. Syllables may be stressed differently, too. "Oregano" in the US tends to be pronounced "o - reg - a - no" whereas in British English it is more likely to be "o - reg - AH - no".
Asked in Definitions, Accents and Dialects

What is the difference between American English and British English?

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The pronunciation is different and so is much of the vocabulary. For example, Americans pronounce words such as 'herbal' without the 'h'. One can easily notice that the accents are much different. Some words are slightly different. For example, in American English the undergarments of a person is called "underwear." However, in British English, it is simply called "pants." Those who speak British English would say 'jam' for what Americans call 'jelly', and 'jelly' what Americans call 'jell-o'. Thus, some words can be easily confused in the opposite cultures. There are also some reasonably consistent spelling differences. There are some common rules for American English. Where UK, Australian and NZ English often use the letter group of our, in American English the u is omitted. In the following examples, the first is UK English and the second is American English: favourite / favorite neighbour / neighbor colour / color UK English uses an s where American English often substitutes a z. In the following examples, the first is UK English and the second is American English: capitalisation / capitalization recognise / recognize In word building, UK English doubles the final consonant where it is preceded by a vowel, whereas American English does not. For example: traveller / traveler labelled / labeled Some words which are spelt with a 'c' in the noun form but an 's' in the verb form of some words are not spelt with the 'c' in American English - both noun and verb forms retain the 's'. practice/practise in U.K. and Australian English is always practise in American English. licence/license is always license in American English. Some words ending in 're' in U.K. and Australian English are spelt with 'er' in American English. centre/center kilometre/ kilometer U.K. English retains the old style of retaining 'oe' and 'ae' in the middle of some words, whilst American English uses just an 'e'. encyclopaedia/encyclopedia manoeuvre/maneuvre Some words in U.K. English retain the 'gue' at the end, as opposed to just the 'g' in American English. dialogue/dialog catalogue/catalog In essence, it could be said that the American English has opted for a simpler style, whilst the U.K./Australian/New Zealand English usually retains the older, more complex spelling rules. British English is more influenced by French/Latin and American English is more influenced by Germanic Languages. The basic difference is British English shows signs of influence from French and Latin in general, while American English shows signs of influence from Germanic Languages. The reason for the spelling differences is in large part due to the "reforms" of Noah Webster who felt some words looked better or had unnecessary letters as in the "colour" cited above. Words like theatre, spelled "theater" in the US, in no way reflect any difference in pronunciation, except for allowing for the more rhotic American pronunciation, and the British spelling reflects the origin of the word, which is from the French theatre from Latin theatrum, so the British spelling reflects the etymology of the word, one reason why archaic spellings are kept. See the Related Link below for examples of the different usage of words.
Asked in English Language, English to German, Accents and Dialects

What does a Chicago accent sound like?

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if you have seen the show the king of queens the mom (jamie gertz) or if you heard Jim belushi talk these are the best examples i can think of off the top of my head
Asked in Accents and Dialects, Idioms, Cliches, and Slang

What is the meaning of the American slang 'blew it'?

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the meaning of the American slang phrase "Blew it" means to really drop the ball, mess something up, or miss an opportunity. We would use it in a sentence like... "Mark you really blew that game." "Man, you blew it, she really liked you." "I totally blew that test."
Asked in Accents and Dialects, Philippines

What is the difference between a Filipino accent and an American accent?

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Some Filipinos say Philippines as Pilippines and Park as Fark; vacation as bacation. They sometimes interchange with those two vowels.