Australian Food

The food in Australia is a mix of international cuisines because of the British, Irish and Asian influences. Some of the most popular Australian foods include Anzac biscuits, Pavlova, and Soldier's Cake.

1,598 Questions
International Cuisine
Australian Food

What are some Australian foods?

Australia doesn't have a specific national food. Foods which may be considered traditionally Australian are those of its indigenous citizens, which vary widely throughout the country. Other Australians may have different views about what constitutes "traditional" foods.

The only food native to Australia that has become particularly popular world wide is the Macadamia nut.

What might be, or once have been, considered 'typical' Australian food is basically English in origin and could include roast meat and vegetables, meat pies, vegemite on toast, and lamingtons for morning tea. Having said that, very few families eat like that regularly.

The food that Australians eat is much the same as that in the rest of the world. Australia is a richly multicultural country and its citizens represent all parts of the globe. Barbeques are popular, whether at home, or at parks or beaches. Barbequed meats, seafood and poultry, vegetables and fruit are all enjoyed, and this is typical of many Australian families.

'Fast foods', or convenience foods, are popular, and the same major chains operate here as in the rest of the world, with many local outlets also operating. The traditional English-style fish 'n' chips shops are always popular, and still sell the Chinese-inspired Chiko Roll, now US-owned, but considered a local cultural icon.

Australia is known for its 'damper and billy tea'. Damper is a simple bush bread, rather like a large scone, cooked on an open fire and served with butter, honey, or syrup. Together with billy tea (tea boiled in a tin can on an open fire), it was popular among swagmen - itinerant 'bushies' - as well as stockmen and other outback workers in Australia's colonial years. These two items are still popular camping fare today.

See the links below for excellent information on Australian food, including a damper recipe.

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Ballet
Australian Food

Can pavlova be frozen?

No. Definitely not.

My family has been freezing Pavalova's since we started eating them. For Christmas, we cook too much and eat not enough and therefore freeze them. They are exactly the same once defrosted but it's not a good idea to freeze them and then deforst them and freeze them again. When freezing them, put them in 'meal sizes' so you're not getting the whole Pavalova out and having to worry about ruining it from defrosting it.

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Australian Food
Sushi

Do people in Australia eat sushi?

Yes.

Australia's Asian population established itself in the 1850's and has influenced Australian cuisine greatly.

Although sushi itself is not something most people in Australia eat every day, the majority have tried it and it is readily available and growing in popularity.

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Australian Food

Where did Dr Cyril Percy Callister live?

VICTORIA.

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Queensland
Australian Food

Where can you buy a large Pavlova in Brisbane?

Around Christmas time, any Woolworths store should offer decent sized pavlovas that will suit either 12 or 15 people. Coles also offers large pavlovas.

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Food & Cooking
International Cuisine
Australia
Australian Food

How are foods prepared or served in Australia?

Australia prepares foods the same ways as other wetsernised nations do. Food culture is a mixture of cultures from around the world. Cooking something on a barbeque or over a campfire would be sterotypical.

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International Cuisine
Australia
Australian Food

Has Korean cuisine influenced Australian cuisine?

Australia has no distinct cuisine OS it has a very cosmopolitan society, However the foods of Asia in general play a much larger part in Australia''sfood since our involvement in the Vietnam war then before then.

It is not strictly correct to say Australia has no distinct cuisine. For a very long time, Australia had a distinctive "cuisine" of simple fare, such as mutton/lamb and potatoes. Australians had simple tastes.

Korean food has had a similar influence on Australian cuisine as other Asian foods, in that Australians are far more willing to experiment with other flavours in their own cooking and when they eat out. The Korean influence can be seen in the spices and condiments which are available in the supermarket, as well as the new variety of menus in restaurants.

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Christmas
Australia
Australian Food

What do people in Australia eat at Christmas?

Christmas dinner in Australia varies, often according to which part of Australia one lives in, and one's personal cultural heritage.

Many Australians enjoy a traditional roast turkey, duck or chicken, and roast ham or honey-glazed ham is popular. This may be cooked in an oven, or on the "Weber" barbeque outside, along with roast potatoes, pumpkin and other trimmings.

Others may take to the nearest park or beach, and simply cook up a barbeque there, consisting of a variety of meats.

Prawns, crabs and salads are also very popular. Australians eat more seafood around Christmas time than at any other time of year, with many specialist seafood outlets taking orders for prawns to ensure supply meets demand. Australians do not eat "shrimp on the barbie"; Australians eat prawns, not shrimp, and very few people waste good prawns by throwing them on the barbeque.

For desserts, Christmas cakes based on the heavy fruit cakes and puddings as made in Britain (and usually served with custard, cream or ice cream) are also popular, as are fruit mince pies. The ever-popular pavlova with fresh cream and fruit is often consumed, as are flavoured ice creams and "Christmas logs", made with ice cream, chocolate, nuts and various other things. Trifle is also common, as is fruit salad.

Generally, because Australia is so multi-cultural, there is a wide range of foods available that conform with Christmas traditions the world over.

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International Cuisine
Australia
Anne Frank
Australian Food

What are some favorite foods of Australians?

Some foods considered uniquely Australian include:

  • Anzac biscuits (cookies)
  • Chiko Rolls (a sort of large spring roll)
  • dim sims (Chinese-style meat dumpling)
  • Jaffas (orange candy-coated chocolate balls)
  • Lamingtons (cubes or squares of sponge cake coated in chocolate icing and dessicated (dried) coconut flakes
  • macadamia nuts.
  • pavlova (fruit- and cream-topped meringue)
  • Tim-Tam (a brand of chocolate biscuit [cookie])
  • Vegemite

There are no true regional food styles in Australia, apart from those specific to areas where a high proportion of immigrants from one country settled and produced a particular food or range of foods, but these food types are no longer restricted to their areas of origin, so what might have once been a favourite food of one district is now available all over the country.

There aren't many seasonal favorite foods: regional differences might occur in some fresh produce, but Australia is fortunate to have great fresh produce - fruit, vegetables, meat, seafood - available year-round and affordable to most. All kinds of breads and pastries are baked daily, and popular foods include meat pies, burgers, kebabs, fish and chips, pasta, pizza, tacos, foods from all over Asia, the Mediterranean, Africa, the Middle East and practically every other region on Earth: you name it, we eat it provided it's stopped wriggling.

Seafood is very popular; the fish is outstanding, and prawns (shrimps), bugs (a kind of slipper lobster), oysters, scallops and other shellfish are especially loved.

Perhaps some of the most popular - favorite - meal types served at home on a daily basis are steak or other roast meat, frequently with chips and vegetables or salads; all the usual versions of spaghetti Bolognese; stir fries; and all types of casserole. Anything cooked on a barbecue is welcomed happily.

In cafes, all the different styles of coffee are served and favorite snacks include croissants, foccacia, panini and all the other varieties of sandwich, muffins, and so on.

International names such as McDonalds, KFC, Pizza Hut, and so on, are hugely popular in Australia. Pizza is the favorite home-delivered food; many Indian and other restaurants home-deliver.

Beer (popularly, lager) and wine are favorite drinks; Australia produces wonderful beers and wines, and also imports huge quantities of both. Spirits are also popular.

Australia has benefited immensely from a diverse culture, and foods either unknown to the original British immigrants or considered by them either inedible or outrageously exotic are now cooked at home all over Australia, served in busy restaurants, and ordered daily with enthusiasm, from takeaway businesses.

You truly wouldn't want to know what Australians considered their staple foods - and favorites - decades back. One example: grey, dried-out roasted meat, soggy potatoes, grey peas out of tins, all covered in artificial gravy, and very possibly with ketchup on the side, followed by stewed tinned fruit with supermarket custard...this was my first meal in this country, and it was enjoyed, sorry, served, on a farm! Somehow, the best of British cooking stayed back in Britain, while the worst examples were routinely served up by homesick immigrants and their descendants until as recently as the 1970s. Great eating-places and markets had always been around in areas with large populations of immigrants other than British, but weren't truly discovered by many Australians until the later years of the twentieth century.

Now, thanks to our wonderfully multicultural population we truly enjoy anything and everything that's been gifted to us by those who could see beyond grey meat and puddings.

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One food in Australia is the honey ant which has a delicious honey sack, or so I've heard.

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Vegemite is a very popular Australian spread, otherwise not much different to the rest of western civilization.

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Shopping
Australian Food

Where can you buy lamington cake?

You can buy lamington cakes (as whole cakes) or just lamingtons almost anywhere in Australia. They are readily available in supermarkets, as well as bakeries, and also often at fetes and fund-raising events.

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Australia
Indigenous Australians
Australian Food

What kind of food do Australians eat?

In general, Australians have the same diet as people in other Western nations such as the US. The culture is diverse, and this is reflected in the cuisine.

Barbecues and a relaxed style of entertaining, favoring an abundance of salads and fresh produce which are available year round in Australia's climate. The major fast food chains as found in other countries around the world are well patronised too, by both young and old.

There are a couple of dishes that Australians have on occasion that may not be familiar. One is Pavlova, a dessert of fruit and cream served on a meringue case. Another popular morning tea snack food is lamington, a sponge cake covered with melted chocolate and dipped in desiccated coconut. Lamingtons may be served as small square blocks, or in a large round cake, sometimes with a jam and cream layer.

A staple food from the past is damper, a simple bread made from flour, salt and water and baked in the coals of a fire. A traditional "bush" food, it is now usually reserved for fun when out camping or around a campfire on the beach or in a park.

Even the indigenous Australians on the whole do not eat their traditional foods as a staple diet. Bush foods, such as wattle (acacia) seeds and witchetty grubs, have become a delicacy available in top restaurants but are not in mainstream consumption.

Australians are very multicultural; they eat a lot of different foods. Australians are some of the largest consumers of meat in the world and the quality is extremely high. Meats consist mainly of beef, lamb, chicken and pork. There is a large variety of vegetables available, as well as potatoes and rice. Sea food is more expensive but nevertheless widely used by most Australians. Other foods include:pastas, pastries, fresh fruits & vegetables. Australians like other cultural foods such as Chinese, Thai, Italian, Mexican and so on. They also enjoy the good old British fish and chips, and meat pies.

Kangaroo meat has become readily available in supermarkets, but for most Australians, it is not part of their everyday fare. It is an acquired taste, and only a small percentage of Australians have acquired that taste ...

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Indigenous Australians
Australian Colonial Settlement
Australian Food

How did early settlers in Australia improve their diets?

by learning how to grow crops in the Australian atmosphere and many more reasons

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International Cuisine
Australia
Australian Food

What do Australians eat?

Australians eat a great variety of food, but some of the more traditional meals could include roast meat (e.g. lamb and beef, both of which are very popular) and vegetables. Other favourites are meat pies, sandwiches (including vegemite) and a variety of baked or fried foods.

Barbeques are popular, whether at home, or at parks or beaches. Barbequed meats, seafood and poultry, vegetables and fruit are all enjoyed, and this is typical of many Australian families.

'Fast foods', or convenience foods, are popular, and the same major chains operate here as in the rest of the world, with many local outlets also operating. The traditional English-style fish 'n' chips shops are always popular, and still sell the Chinese-inspired Chiko Roll, now US-owned, but considered a local cultural icon.

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Ballet
Australian Food

Where does the name pavlova come from?

Pavlova is a Russian name.

If the question is in reference to the meringue dessert claimed by both Australia and New Zealand, the dish is said to have been named after Anna Pavlova, a Russian ballet dancer, who was on tour in 1926 and 1929. Anna Pavlova was a famous ballerina and her dances are best described as light and airy, similar to the dessert.

Research indicates that the pavlova was originally from New Zealand. The Australian claim is that it was invented by a Perth chef in 1935; New Zealand claims are based on a recipes in a magazine and a cookery book from 1929 and 1933, with additional reports from a biographer stating that it was invented in 1926 after Anna Pavlova's visit.

Rivalry between the two countries regarding the origin of the pavlova has continued for decades - and will probably continue for many more. The article at the link below concedes that the dessert now known as the pavlova most likely originated in New Zealand, but that the actual name of Pavlova, after Russian ballerina Anna Pavlova, was bestowed upon it by a Perth chef.

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Australia in WW2
Australia
Australian Food

How does vegemite influence Australia's identity?

It doesn't, however many Australian people have a real taste for it.

555657
Australian Food

What do people in Australia eat for breakfast?

People in Australia eat variations on the theme of cereal, porridge, muesli and/or toast for breakfast. Popular toast spreads include vegemite, cheese, peanut paste, jams and marmalades. Some healthy Australians eat fruit and yoghurt for breakfast.

Cooked breakfasts are also popular at cafes on weekends. These might be bacon and eggs, Eggs Benedict, pancakes, hotcakes, sausages and eggs, etc. Takeaway bacon and egg rolls or muffins from McDonalds or Hungry Jacks are also very popular.

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Australia in WW2
Australian Food

How has France impacted on Australian food patterns?

shut up nat

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Australian Food

Who are the competitors of National Foods Limited in Australia?

Habib Foods

515253
Australia
Australian Food

What are the main crops grown in Australia?

The main crop grown in Australia is wheat.

Because of Australia's range of climates, the country is able to grow nearly any crop here as long as there is water available to do it and the soil is suitable. Greengrocers in Australia offer a fantastic array of fruit and vegetables, most of which are locally grown. There is a huge variety of fruits and vegetables - apples, oranges, melons, citrus, tropical, pears, potatoes, onions, salad vegetables, carrots, lettuce, cabbage, broccoli, tomatoes - anything you can imagine. Australia has a very strong stonefruit industry (cherries, peaches, apricots, nectarines, etc) while the tropical areas supply pineapples, mangoes, and bananas.

Sugar cane is a significant industry in the eastern and north-eastern regions.

Australia grows a lot of cereal crops - wheat, barley, oats for example and also leguminous crops - beans, lentils, chickpeas, as well as oilseed crops such as rapeseed (canola), safflower and sunflower.

Corn is an increasingly popular food crop, as is rice, although the latter requires large amounts of water to be diverted from the river system.

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International Cuisine
Australia
Australian Food

What are the most popular foods in Australia?

Australia's most popular foods are barbequed meats, particularly steak and lamb chops. Roast chicken and roast lamb are very popular, and roast beef and roast pork are increasing in populariry. Another answer in this section suggests that "Mahi mahi" is a popular dish, but this dish is not even known by most Australians. Lamingtons (not "lambingtons" as suggested by another contributor) are distinctly Australian, as are ANZAC biscuits, but they would not be counted as among the most popular foods. The prawn cocktails also mentioned by another contributor are not very poular, tasty though they are. Australians eat tonnes of prawns a year, but these are usually just eaten as a side dish, not as prawn cocktails. The other suggestion by another contributor of something called "Vovo" is quite off the track. Iced Vovos are a type of biscuit, but they are not at all what one would refer to as most popular foods.

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Home Improvement
Heating Ventilating and Air Conditioning
Fireplaces
Australian Food

What is a damper?

damper is a Australian bread.That is a type of food from Australia.

474849
International Cuisine
Australia
Australian Food

What are the main foods grown in Australia?

The main food crop grown in Australia is wheat.

Because of Australia's range of climates, the country is able to grow nearly any crop here as long as there is water available to do it and the soil is suitable. Greengrocers in Australia offer a fantastic array of fruit and vegetables, most of which are locally grown. There is a huge variety of fruits and vegetables - apples, oranges, melons, citrus, tropical, pears, potatoes, onions, salad vegetables, carrots, lettuce, cabbage, broccoli, tomatoes - anything you can imagine. Australia has a very strong stonefruit industry (cherries, peaches, apricots, nectarines, etc) while the tropical areas supply pineapples, mangoes, and bananas.

Sugar cane is a significant industry in the eastern and north-eastern regions.

Australia grows a lot of cereal crops - wheat, barley, oats for example and also leguminous crops - beans, lentils, chickpeas, as well as oilseed crops such as rapeseed (canola), safflower and sunflower.

Livestock are also "grown" and bred in Australia. Beef cattle is a thriving food industry, as are sheep for meat ("fat lambs"), pigs and poultry. Given that milk is a food, one should also include dairy cattle in the list.

Corn is an increasingly popular food crop, as is rice, although the latter requires large amounts of water to be diverted from the river system.

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Divorce and Marriage Law
International Government
Australian Food
Polygamy

Is Vegemite legal in the US?

== ==

No. It is legal. In October 2006, the Melbourne newspaper, the Herald Sun incorrectly reported that Vegemite had been banned in the United States, and that the United States Customs Service had gone so far as to search Australians entering the country for Vegemite. The story appears to have originated as an anecdote by a traveler who claimed to have been searched by US Customs. Also, a spokesperson for Kraft made a misinformed comment to reporters. The story led to some anti-American comments in blogs and newspapers. The Herald Sun blamed the US President for the ban, and encouraged readers to post comments on its website and send emails to the White House. The US Food and Drug Administration later stated that although it is technically illegal in the US to add folate to food products other than grains, there were no plans to investigate whether Vegemite contains folate, subject it to an import ban, or withdraw it from supermarket shelves. The United States Customs and Border Protection also tried to dispel the rumor, stating on its website that "there is no known prohibition on the importation of Vegemite" and "there is no official policy within CBP targeting Vegemite for interception".[5] The story of the "ban" later took on the status of urban legend.[6] While Vegemite has never been popular in the U.S., it can still be purchased at supermarkets that stock imported food items.[7] source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vegimite#United_States_ban_rumour

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Idioms, Cliches, and Slang
Australia
Australia Literature and Language
Australian Food

How do you say food in Australian slang?

Tucker

414243
Australian Food
Cakes

What is the Australian famous cake?

One famous Australian cake is the lamington, a small square of sponge, coated in melted chocolate and desiccated coconut. There are variations of this now, with lamingtons cakes available as a large, round sponge, usually with jam and fresh or mock cream separating two layers.

Another famous Australian and New Zealand "cake" is the pavlova. This is a meringue cake, served with whipped cream and sliced fresh fruit.

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